AGENDA

 

 

Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting

I hereby give notice that a Meeting of the Strategy and Operations Committee will be held on:

Date:

Thursday, 5 March 2020

Time:

9.30am

Location:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor, 175 Rimu Road

Paraparaumu

James Jefferson

Group Manager Place and Space

 


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

Kapiti Coast District Council

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Strategy and Operations Committee will be held in the Council Chamber, Ground Floor, 175 Rimu Road, Paraparaumu, on Thursday 5 March 2020, 9.30am.

Strategy and Operations Committee Members

Cr James Cootes

Chair

Cr Gwynn Compton

Deputy

Mayor K Gurunathan

Member

Deputy Mayor Janet Holborow

Member

Cr Angela Buswell

Member

Cr Jackie Elliott

Member

Cr Martin Halliday

Member

Cr Sophie Handford

Member

Cr Jocelyn Prvanov

Member

Cr Bernie Randall

Member

Cr Robert McCann

Member

 


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

Order Of Business

1          Welcome. 5

2          Council Blessing. 5

3          Apologies. 5

4          Declarations of Interest Relating to Items on the Agenda. 5

5          Public Speaking Time for Items Relating to the Agenda. 5

6          Members’ Business. 5

7          Updates. 5

Nil

8          Reports. 6

8.1            Kāpiti Coast Youth Council Update 2020. 6

8.2            Kapiti Coast Older Persons' Council update 2020. 16

8.3            Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group - Terms of Reference Review.. 38

8.4            Finance Report as at 31 December 2019. 52

8.5            QUARTERLY ACTIVITY REPORT. 72

8.6            Contracts Under Delegated Authority. 165

8.7            Food Stall Approvals at Markets, Events and other sites Policy. 168

8.8            Submission on Draft National Policy Statement on Indigenous Biodiversity. 176

8.9            Kāpiti Economic Development Strategy: 2020/21 Major Events Fund Process. 212

9          Public Speaking Time. 215

 

 

 

 


1            Welcome

2            Council Blessing

“As we deliberate on the issues before us, we trust that we will reflect positively on the  communities we serve. Let us all seek to be effective and just, so that with courage, vision and energy, we provide positive leadership in a spirit of harmony and compassion.”

I a mātou e whiriwhiri ana i ngā take kei mua i ō mātou aroaro, e pono ana mātou ka kaha tonu ki te whakapau mahara huapai mō ngā hapori e mahi nei mātou.  Me kaha hoki mātou katoa kia whaihua, kia tōtika tā mātou mahi, ā, mā te māia, te tiro whakamua me te hihiri ka taea te arahi i roto i te kotahitanga me te aroha.

3            Apologies

4            Declarations of Interest Relating to Items on the Agenda

Notification from Elected Members of:

4.1 – any interests that may create a conflict with their role as an elected member relating to the items of business for this meeting, and

4.2 – any interests in items in which they have a direct or indirect pecuniary interest as provided for in the Local Authorities (Members’ Interests) Act 1968

5            Public Speaking Time for Items Relating to the Agenda

6            Members’ Business

(a)       Public Speaking Time Responses

(b)       Leave of Absence

(c)       Matters of an Urgent Nature (advice to be provided to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting)

7            Updates

Nil


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

8            Reports

8.1         Kāpiti Coast Youth Council Update 2020

Author:                    Tania Parata, Manager Connected Communities

Authoriser:             Janice McDougall, Group Manager

 

Purpose of Report

1        This report provides the Committee with an update on the Kāpiti Coast Youth Council’s activities, projects and events for 2020/21.

Delegation

2        The Strategy and Operations Committee has the responsibility of receiving reports from any community or advisory group.

Background

3        The Kāpiti Coast Youth Council is a membership group of young people living in the Kāpiti district between the ages of 14 and 24 years.

4        Membership includes young people in secondary school, alternative education and employment from across the district. This year, four youth representatives from local youth service providers also make up the Youth Council.

5        Every year the Youth Council holds a recruitment process to ensure that membership is diverse and balanced across the district. Currently there are 18 members.

6        The Kāpiti Coast Youth Council has set a

-     Provide a way for young people to identify their needs and have their needs met.

-     Have representation within the Kāpiti Coast community.

-     Have a legitimate voice in the community.

-     Facilitate participation in the democratic framework and decision-making process.

-     Advocate for young people’s needs and deliver their commitment under the Youth Action Plan.

Youth Action Plan

7        In February 2017, the Strategy and Planning Committee endorsed the Kāpiti Youth Action Plan 2016-2018. A response to key findings raised in a Youth-wide survey undertaken in 2015 and 2016.

8        The Action Plan provides a joined- up approach for the council and the Youth Council to deliver on agreed commitments within the Youth Action Plan. The overall goals are outlined below:

 

GOAL ONE: Communities which are safe for and supportive of our diverse youth   communities.

GOAL TWO: A Council which values and listens to its young people.

GOAL THREE: A district which has youth friendly spaces and places.

GOAL FOUR: A district where there is lots for young people to do.

GOAL FIVE: A district which supports strong positive youth development.

 

 

9        To ensure the Youth Council is supported to fulfil its role and achieve tasks under the Action Plan, the council continues to:

-        Appoint Councillor representative to champion for the Youth Council

-        Provide staff support and administration resource

-        Keep the Youth Council up-to-date with information about council priorities and initiatives of relevance to young people.

10      Overall the Action Plan seeks to improve the quality of life for young people living in the district. It also seeks benefits through increasing youth participation in decision making through youth development.

Update

11      The Youth Council propose to extend the 2016-2018 Action Plan to cover the current period as the Youth Council feel that the goals and actions outlined in the Action Plan are relevant to young people today.

12      It is intended that the Youth Action Plan will be reviewed in 2020/21 in line with the upcoming Long Term Plan.

2020 priorities for action:

13      To achieve the goals within the Action Plan the Youth Council have focussed on the following projects:

Te Anamata – An Ōtaki community based project that aims to engage rangatahi to better understand their needs. This project will inform and provide a platform for youth-led initiatives for rangatahi of Ōtaki.

-        Secrets of Kāpiti– A campaign to raise awareness of things for young people to do in Kāpiti. The social media campaign features the district attractions. The project is near completion.

Youth Week project – a collaboration with Zeal Kāpiti and Kāpiti Youth Support. This project supports the national Youth week campaign and aims to celebrate the voice of young people and the power of listening to young people. Youth week is in May 2020.

ThinkBIG – grants for Youth-led project - ThinkBIG begins with a forum for young people with inspirational speakers to get youth to act on ideas that support youth and community wellbeing. The programme is then followed by a contestable grants process with support from technical experts, workshops and peer youth mentoring. $1,800 is available per project. Think BIG will be up and running later in 2020.

-        Youth Enviro Summit  - The Youth Council will partner with student enviro groups from Kāpiti College, Paraparaumu College and Ōtaki College  to deliver the second youth enviro summit in June 2020.

-        Youth-wide engagement project will get underway later in the year. The project will provide an opportunity for young people to share their experiences, opinions and concerns and will provide the foundation for a refreshed Youth Action. Information captured will also help inform Council’s Long Term Plan.

Considerations

Policy considerations

14      The revised Youth Action Plan will replace the Youth Action Plan 2016-2018 adopted in 2017.

Legal considerations

15      There are no legal considerations to implement this decision

Financial considerations

16      Projects under the Youth Action Plan will be funded from the existing Youth Support/Development budgets. Approximately $70,000 per annum is available.

17      Administrative support for the Youth Council is funded from existing budgets.

18      The 2020/21 budget allocation will include a Youth-wide engagement project to better understand the needs of young people living in the district and inform a revised Youth Action Plan.

Tāngata whenua considerations

19      The Kāpiti Coast Youth Council regularly report to Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti and will update Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti once the action plan has been endorsed by the Committee.

20      Projects within the Action Pan focus on greater use of te reo Māori and enabling better connections with kura kaupapa to enable positive youth development opportunities.

Strategic considerations

The Action Plan contributes to Council’s vision of a vibrant, diverse and thriving Kāpiti. It contributes specifically to the council’s outcomes of a community better supported to lead initiatives and able to respond to agreed community priorities.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

21      This matter has a low level of significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Consultation already undertaken

22      The Youth Acton Plan is a response to key findings of the Youth Survey. Although the survey was undertaken in 2015 and 2016. The Youth Council feel that the findings are relevant to youth people in Kāpiti today.

23      The initial youth survey captured a significant section (15%) of the young people aged 14 – 24 years and is a youth-led project. Consultation and engagement will be revisited in 2020/21 to align with the council’s upcoming Long Term Plan process.

Engagement planning

24      Engagement is focused on young people in Kāpiti and informing the wider community about the Action Plan.

Publicity

25      A youth friendly version of the Action Plan will be promoted to young people through digital platforms and social media. It will also be available on the council website.

Other Considerations

26      Advisory groups like the Youth Council are an important feature in aiding a participatory approach to understanding the effects and impacts of policy and programmes which also allows the council to advocate on behalf of our youth communities to improve public policies.

27      It is important to note that the Action Plan focuses on actions to be undertaken by the council and the Youth Council. It does not involve or consider direct action by central government or non-government organisations on youth development, youth health or other youth related outcomes in the District.

 

 

Recommendations

28      That the Strategy and Policy Committee endorses the Kāpiti Coast Youth Action Plan 2020/21.

29      That the Committee take the opportunity to  thank the Kāpiti Coast Youth Council for their contribution and ongoing work within the District.

 

Appendices

1.       Appendix A: Youth Action Plan 2020/21  

 


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

Appendix 1

Youth Action Plan 2020-2021

The Action Plan outlines the joint commitments the Council and the Youth Council make to young people in the District aged 12 – 24 years of age. The Action Plan seeks to improve the quality of life for young people living in the District.  It also seeks benefits for the District through increased youth participation in decision-making in core Council business. 

 

The goals for 2016 – 2019 are:

 

GOAL 1: Communities which are safe for and supportive of our diverse youth communities

GOAL 2: A Council which values and listens to its young people

GOAL 3: A District which has youth friendly spaces and places

GOAL 4: A District where there is lots for young people to do

GOAL 5: A District which supports strong positive youth development

 

The Youth Council manages the content, advancement and structure of the Action Plan in partnership with the Council. Each year the Youth Council direct their programme of work to progress towards the overall outcomes and goals of the Action Plan. 

 

The Kāpiti Coast Youth Survey 2015/16 and other information sourced by the Youth Council informs the goals and aims of the Action Plan. The Youth Survey captured the views of over 15% of our youth population. A majority of survey respondents were secondary school aged and additional information was sourced from young people aged 19 – 24 through other research projects and focus groups.

 

The key findings of the Kāpiti Coast Youth Survey 2015/16

 

·    young people feel connected to whanau, family and their community

·  those in secondary school feel engaged and successful at school

·  young people feel happy at home and positive about their future.

·    young people are working or want to work

·    young people’s financial support defines what opportunities they can access

·    some young people are unsupported, face many barriers and are unsure about their future.

·    young people continue to struggle with transport options.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

GOAL 1: Communities which are safe for and supportive of our diverse youth communities

 

Young people want safe and healthy communities which respect and include young people. Communities where adults and young people respect each other, where cultural diversity is celebrated.  

 

The Youth Council aims to:

· Encourage initiatives that provide opportunities for young people to volunteer

· Support community initiatives which strengthen young people’s cultural identities

· Increase options for young people to access safe lifestyles

· Increase young people’s feeling of safety in the District

 

Council aims are to:

· Make sure the spaces, places and routes young people use are safe and accessible

· Advocate for good and safe public transport which meets the needs of young people

· Encourage organisations working with young people to work together

· Promote positive youth development stories in the District

 

 

 

 

GOAL 2: A Council which values and listens to its young people

 

Local government decisions have a significant impact on young people and their lives and young people want to contribute to decision-making.  Good youth participation in Council decision-making processes can improve the quality of services received by young people now and in the future.

 

The Youth Council aims to:

· Keep young people informed about our work through a range of methods

· Ensure consultation is inclusive of the wide diversity of young people in the District

· Connect with community organisations and schools to stay in touch with young people’s needs and interests

· Advocate for young people’s needs through formal and informal Council processes

 

Council aims to:

· Ensure good communication is maintained between the youth council and Council

· Continue to resource and support the Youth Council to ensure its sustainability and effectiveness

· Provide opportunities for young people to have their say on key council projects and decision-making which affects young people’s lives

 

 

 

GOAL 3: A District which has youth friendly spaces and places

 

Community places and spaces such parks, pools and beaches are important for young people. The development of the youth centre and its mobile services will provide youth development opportunities for young people across the District. The youth centre will provide a second ‘home’ for young people and activities held in community places will strengthen young people’s connection to them.

 

The Youth Council aims to:

· Continue to actively prioritise the establishment of the Youth Development and mobile services

· Ensure young people are able to have a say on changes to community spaces 

· Identify places where young people are seen as an issue and develop projects to build community 

 

Council aims to:

· Support mobile activities of the Youth Development Centre delivered in our parks and open spaces

· Improve the accessibility of public spaces to young people

·  Strengthen young people’s interest in our indoor and outdoor community spaces

 

 

 

 

GOAL 4: A District where there is lots for young people to do

 

Young people want meaningful activities to engage in. They want paid employment and need help to find work at times. They want to get creative and try new things. Cost is a barrier for many young people and low cost and free opportunities are needed.

 

The Youth Council aims to:

· Support community activities for young people which are free and accessible to all young people

· Facilitate activities to celebrate National Youth Week on an annual basis

· Provide and support community projects which engage young people in learning and expressing themselves through creative means

 

Council aims to:

· Support Youth Council initiatives which showcase young people’s skills and talents

· Ensure young people are involved in consultation on recreational, art and cultural facilities in the District

· Increase the number of free and low cost activities for young people to do in Council places and spaces

 

 

 

 

GOAL 5: A District which supports strong positive youth development

 

Young people need lots of help as they face the issues, challenges and opportunities of growing up. Positive youth development is a process which we can contribute to, helping young people reach their full potential.

 

The Youth Council aims to:

· Support the youth development activities delivered through the Youth Development Centre

· Advocate for the Council to contribute more to young people’s employment journey

· Partner with other youth organisations to pursue youth development goals for young people

 

Council aims to:

· Advocate to central government for appropriate resourcing for youth needs in the District

· Work with government and non-government organisations to ensure good provision of services for young people across the district

· Support the development of skilled people to work with young people

 

 

 


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

8.2         Kapiti Coast Older Persons' Council update 2020

Author:                    Tania Parata, Manager Programme Design & Delivery

Authoriser:             Janice McDougall, Group Manager

 

Purpose of Report

1        This report provides the Committee with a brief summary on the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council activities, projects and events for 2020.

Delegation

2        The Strategy and Operations Committee has the responsibility of receiving reports from any community or advisory group.

Background

3        The Kāpiti Coast Older Persons Council formally known as the ‘Kāpiti Coast Council of Elders’ was established in 2008 as part of a districtwide campaign to achieve community outcomes and support collaborative action through working together.

4        The Older Persons’ Council is an advisory group of individuals and service providers who bring an older persons’ and service provision perspective to policy, strategies and work programmes within Council.

5        In addition to an advisory role the Older Persons’ Council, with support from the council, develops and implements activities that aim to promote the wellbeing of older adults in Kāpiti. Initiatives and activities in recent years have included:

·    A biennial expo event.

·    A biennial community forum.

·    A celebratory event for Elder Person of the Year awards.

·    A driving force for the development of Council’s first Positive Ageing Strategy, He Tira Kaumātua (2011).

·    The Older Persons’ Council representation on a wide range of community and council work groups and advisory groups.

·    Advocating on behalf for positive change.

 

6        The Older Persons’ Council has established itself with regular monthly meetings featuring guest speakers on relevant topics. The group also shares relevant community information through an ‘updates segment’ at each meeting, this enables members to share information about important issues and events.

7        The Older Persons’ Council has open membership for, people living and providers servicing, the Kāpiti Coast district.  Each triennium, Council appoints one elected member to the Older Persons’ Council.  Cr Halliday is the Council representative for this triennium.

8        To support the functionality of the Older Persons’ Council, members have adopted a shared facilitation group structure with active work groups to carry out core activities as outlined in the following figure.

 

          

 

9        A terms of reference outlines the role and responsibilities of the group and its unique relationship with council. The 2017 terms of reference are attached at Appendix A of this report.

10      Today, the Older Persons’ Council has over 30 members and in September 2019, partnered with the Kāpiti Accessibility Advisory Group and the council to host an ‘All Age on the Go’ Expo at Waikanae Memorial hall. Over 600 people participated in the event which brings together a variety of information, community groups and services in the form of exhibition stalls and displays.

update

Proposed Work plan for 2020/21

11      Late last year, the Older Persons’ Council reviewed their work plan and projects to better reflect their priorities for action.

12      Additional to their advisory role, the Older Persons’ Council have a number of key initiatives underway that aim to address the differing needs and challenges of diverse ageing communities in the District through;

·    developing an approach to increase the group’s profile in the community to enhance membership;

·    adopting a structure with workgroups dedicated to strength-based and solutions-focused projects.

·    hosting an annual event that celebrates and acknowledges older people that are trail-blazers and community leaders;

·    enhancing and leading Age Friendly work in Kāpiti; and

·    being across emergent community issues to advocate on behalf of older people in the district.

13      The Older Persons Council will continue to meet monthly with administrative support from the council.

14      A detailed work plan is attached at Appendix B of this report.

Considerations

Policy considerations

15      The Older Persons’ Council will have significant input into an age friendly approach for council to finalise in the coming months.

The Positive Ageing on the Kāpiti Coast, He Tira Kaumātua strategy adopted in 2011 will be superseded by the Age Friendly Kāpiti initiative.

Legal considerations

16      There are no legal considerations as a result of this report.

Financial considerations

17      Support for the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council is provided by the Council’s Community Support Activity. Every year approximately $11,000 is available for projects allocated to Older Persons’ and $5,000 to support administration and secretariat resourcing.

Tāngata whenua considerations

18      Although the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council has open membership it recognises the diverse communities that make up the Kāpiti district and strives to recruit from local iwi.

Strategic considerations

19      The work of the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council contributes to Council’s Long term goals of building resilient communities that has support for basic needs and feels safe and connected.

20      The advisory role of the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council provides a lived experience perspective that provides significant insights to help shape Council’s advocacy to support resilient communities

21      The Kāpiti Older Persons’ Council’s work programme models a community development approach which promotes and supports communities to lead initiatives in response to agreed community priorities.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

22      This matter has a low level of significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Consultation already undertaken

23      The work programme and activities outlined in this report are community-led, developed by the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council members and aimed at strengthening the wellbeing of local communities.

Engagement planning

24      An engagement plan is not needed to implement this decision.

Publicity

25      No publicity is required in relation to this paper.

26      It is important to note that council promotes and publicises events and activities through its existing promotional channels as part of developing programmes of work with the Older Persons’ council. Publicity is developed on a project by project basis.

Other Considerations

27      Many factors influence how policy and work programmes are developed and finalised in the Council environment. The Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council are available to provide input from a range of lived experiences to help identify inequalities or impacts for older adults in the development of Council projects, programmes and activities.

28      Advisory groups like the Older Persons’ Council are an important feature in aiding a participatory approach to understanding the effects and impacts of policy and programmes which also allows Council to advocate on behalf of our communities to improve public policies.

 

 

Recommendations

29      That the Strategy and Policy Committee endorses the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council’s work programme for 2020. Attached as Appendix 2 of this report.

30      That the Committee takes this opportunity to thank the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council for their valuable and ongoing work within the District.

 

 

 

Appendices

1.       Appendix A: Terms of Reference

2.       Appendix B:Work Plan 2020/21

3.       Appendix C:Positive Ageing Strategy, He Tira Kamātua  

 


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

·       

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE 2018

Objective

To be an independent ‘voice’ for older people in the community and to advise Council and community on issues that concern and affect older people.

Functions

The Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council has been established to work with the Council and Community, working to shape ideas and to influence and initiate policy.


Responsibilities

·    To advise Council and Community on issues within the Kāpiti Coast District which affect older people;

·    To act as an information conduit to and from Council for older people;

·    To make submissions on draft policies and plans of Council;

·    To advocate to regional and central government; and

·    To formally report back to Council.

Procedures

Frequency

The Group will meet regularly every month from January to November.

Delegation

The Programme Advisor (Social), Programme Design and Delivery or other nominee will be the point of contact at the Kāpiti Coast District Council.

Membership

Membership from the community is open, on an individual basis or as representatives of groups.


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

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5 March 2020

 

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Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

8.3         Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group - Terms of Reference Review

Author:                    Stuart Kilmister, Programme Manager CWB

Authoriser:             James Jefferson, Group Manager Place and Space 

 

Purpose of Report

1        This report presents for adoption the revised Terms of Reference for Council’s Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group for the 2019-2022 Triennium.

Delegation

2        The Strategy and Operations Committee has the authority to consider this matter under section b1 of the Governance Structure, delegations 2019-2022.

Background

3        The Kāpiti Cycleway, Walkway and Bridleway (CWB) Advisory Group is a voluntary group which seeks to extend the CWB network and to improve the cycling, walking and equestrian experience in the Kāpiti Coast. Our district is becoming renowned for walking cycling and horse riding and as the network is completed, it contributes to a vibrant Kāpiti economy.

4        The purpose of the CWB Advisory Group (The Group) is to advise Council on issues and opportunities within the district that will enhance the CWB network. Membership is comprised of community volunteers who have a passionate interest in CWB matters and tends to be long standing. The formation of the Group was approved by Council six trienniums ago to address the loss (and lack of) public access and connections between communities as the Kapiti Coast has developed over the last 20+ years. The Group has been instrumental in developing a CWB strategy, network plan and dedicated full time position on staff.

5        The Group is made up of two Elected Members and one community representative from each of the following interest groups (including a deputy), representing walking, on-road cycling, equestrian, off-road cycling, recreational open space, accessibility, environmental care groups, youth and older persons.

6        The Group also consists of one representative from each of the following iwi with whom Council works under a Memorandum of Partnership; Ngā Hapu o Ōtaki, Te Ātiawa Charitable Trust and Ngāti Toa Rangatira.

7        The Terms of Reference (ToR) outlines the Cycleways, Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group’s objectives, structure and scope and guides how the Group functions. The Terms of Reference of the Group is required to be reviewed at the start of each triennium.

8        The Group reviewed the Terms of Reference at the 9 October and 11 December 2019 meetings and requested the changes proposed below. The Group has asked that these now be presented to the Strategy and Operations Committee for adoption.

Issues and Options

Issues

9        The review has resulted in minor changes as follows.

Proposed change 1

Under the current ToR the two Elected Members appointed to the advisory group could be a primary or deputy representative of the listed interest groups.

It is proposed that the ToR is changed to state that ‘Elected Members cannot be the primary or deputy representative of the listed interest groups’. This is to avoid any potential conflict of interest due to being an elected member and a specific interest group representative at one time. One of the strengths of the Group is that while each member provides robust representation for their specific interest, it is not at the expense of the other roles and representatives within the Group. Their concern is that this mutually supporting relationship could be compromised by the elevation of a representative into a governance role in Council.

This was requested by the Group to ensure there are no implications for governance if a primary or deputy member of the Group were elected onto a Community Board or Council.

Proposed change 2

The current ToR Clause 3.4 names the following Council officers as attending meetings:

·    Group Manager Community Services

·    Parks and Recreation CWB officer

·    Infrastructure CWB Officer

 

It is proposed that the ToR is changed to better reflect what is current practice to include the following Council officers:

·    Parks and Recreation Manager

·    Senior Parks Officer

·    CWB Programme Manager

·    Executive Secretary Place and Space

 

It is requested that the Parks and Recreation Manager be removed from the list of supporting staff to the Group and replaced with the Group Manager Place and Space. The Role of Executive Secretary Place and Space will be included with Council staff attending Group meetings

This has been requested by officers to reflect staff changes in title and role since the previous triennium’s ToR. There will be no changes in Governance evident.

Proposed change 3

Clause 12 Council Staff Supporting the Advisory Group has been amended to state:

Council staff who manage or deliver specific projects in Council may be requested to attend Advisory Group meetings to share their knowledge and experience on matters of interest to the Group. Council staff supporting the Advisory Group when required include Group Manager Place and Space

This has been requested by officers to reflect what is current practice and no change in governance will be evident.

Proposed change 4

Currently only the primary representative from each of the interest groups has a speaking role at the meeting. 

It is proposed in Clause 7 that if a deputy representative may have more technical knowledge on a specific issue than the primary representative, the primary representative may defer their speaking time to the deputy with the express permission of the Chair, and in such cases the primary would relinquish their speaking rights on that issue.

This was requested by the Chair of the Group to ensure Group meetings keep to time.

Proposed change 5

Clause 18.4 has been amended to state:

Make recommendations to the Group Manager Place and Space and Council on new opportunities and CWB matters.

This has been requested by officers to ensure full Council support for a recommendation, not a nominated portion of Council.

Proposed change 6

Clause 19.4 has been amended to state:

Advise on projects and recommend funding allocation to the Kāpiti Coast District Council through the delegated Council Committee and corporate planning processes.

This has been requested by officers to clarify Council processes in the ToR so improvements to governance will be evident.

Proposed change 7

Clause 19.5 currently states “if required” at the end of the clause.

It is proposed that “if required’ is removed and clause 18.5 would read as:

A)  Consider and make recommendations to the delegated Council Committee and/or the Chief Executive on involvement in relation to events, issues, reports, plans and subdivisions in relation to encouraging cycling, walking and horse riding on the Kāpiti Coast.

This was requested by the Group so that the Group may always make recommendations to the delegated Council Committee and /or the Chief Executive. This will have little impact on governance as the mechanism to do so, via reports to Council (such as this report) has a non-negotiable time delay between the writing of the report and the receipt of the decision. By far and away the most frequently used and effective advocacy method for the Group is to work at officer level with staff attending Group meetings, leaving any unresolved matters the opportunity to be escalated to the Group Manager, Place and Space when requested.  

Considerations

Policy considerations

10      There are no policy considerations.

Legal considerations

11      There are no legal considerations.

Financial considerations

12      There are no financial considerations

Tāngata whenua considerations

13      To ensure that we are working within our Partnership Agreement, Iwi representation remains included on the list of representatives. Invitation to appoint to these positions shall be made via Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

14      This matter has a low level of significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Consultation already undertaken

15      The Chair and members of the Group provided feedback to staff at the last meeting of the last triennium on October 9 2019. In response to this draft feedback, the draft terms of reference were prepared and presented to the Group at the subsequent meeting on 11 December. At this meeting the Group accepted the Terms of Reference and asked they be presented to Council for adoption.

Engagement planning

16      An engagement plan is not needed to implement this decision.

Publicity

17      There are no publicity considerations.

 

Recommendations

18      That the Kāpiti Coast District Council adopts the Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group Draft Terms of Reference, 2019-2022 as attached in Appendix One of this report.

 

 

Appendices

1.       Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group Draft Terms of Reference 2019-2022

2.       Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways Advisory Group Terms of Reference 2016-2019   


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

 

Cycleway, Walkway, Bridleway Advisory Group

Terms of Reference, 2019-2022

 

BACKGROUND

1.   The Kāpiti Cycleway, Walkway and Bridleway (CWB) Advisory Group is a voluntary group which seeks to extend the CWB network and to improve the cycling, walking, and equestrian experience on the Kāpiti Coast.

PURPOSE

2.   The purpose of the Advisory Group is to advise Council on issues and opportunities within the CWB network

CONSTITUTION & MEMBERSHIP

3.   The membership of the Kāpiti Cycleway, Walkway and Bridleway Advisory Group is:

3.1.       Two elected members

3.2.       One community representative from each of the following interest groups, with a Deputy from each also able to attend:

3.2.1.     Walking

3.2.2.     On Road Cycling

3.2.3.     Equestrian

3.2.4.     Off Road Cycling

3.2.5.     Recreational Open Space

3.2.6.     Accessibility

3.2.7.     Environmental Care Groups

3.2.8.     Youth

3.2.9.     Older Persons

3.2.10.   Elected Council members cannot be representative of the listed interest groups

3.3.       One representative from each of the following iwi with whom Council works under a Memorandum of Partnership:

3.3.1.     Ngā Hapu o Ōtaki

3.3.2.     Te Ātiawa Charitable Trust

3.3.3.     Ngāti Toa Rangatira

3.4.       Council officers

3.4.1.     Parks and Recreation Manager

3.4.2.     Parks Officer CWB

3.4.3.     Senior Parks Officer

3.4.4.     Executive Secretary Place and Space

4.   Community representatives will be confirmed at the first meeting of each triennium.  The terms of reference will also be reviewed at this time.

5.   The Chairperson will be one of the community representatives listed in paragraphs 3.2 & 3.3 The Chairperson will be determined by the members listed in paragraphs 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 at the first meeting of each triennium.

6.   When an Advisory Group member stands down or a replacement is needed recommendations will be sought from the incumbent or the group they represent with the new representative approved by members listed in 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3.

7.   When a Deputy has more technical knowledge on a specific issue than the Primary the Primary may defer their speaking time to the Deputy with the express permission of the chair, and in such cases the primary would relinquish their speaking rights on that issue.

8.   Invitation to appoint iwi representation shall be made through Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti.

9.   Voting rights during meetings are limited to members listed in paragraphs 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 provided that each group or each iwi is entitled to one vote.

10. Recommendations from the group shall be formed by way of majority vote.

11. Agendas and minutes of the meetings will be circulated to all Members listed in paragraph 3.

12. Council staff who manage or deliver specific projects in Council may be requested to attend Advisory Group meetings to share their knowledge and experience on matters of interest to the Group. Council Staff supporting the Advisory Group when required include:

12.1.     Group Manager, Place and Space

13. The Advisory Group may also co-opt or invite members as agreed from other relevant groups, including but not limited to specialist community groups, environmental groups and Care Groups.

MEETING FREQUENCY

14. Meetings will be held on a bimonthly basis (every two months) unless determined otherwise by the Group.

15. The Council will provide secretarial support for the Group.

16. Minutes, including Matters Under Action, will be distributed within four weeks of meetings.

QUORUM

17. A quorum is: one elected member, plus three community representatives, plus one council officer.


OBJECTIVES

18. The objectives of the Advisory Group are to:

18.1.     Proactively identify opportunities, issues and advise on cycling, walking, and equestrian matters on the Kāpiti Coast in general

18.2.     Advise on priorities for implementing the Cycleway, Walkway and Bridleway (CWB) Strategy, Network Plan and Activity Management Plan in the Kāpiti Coast District

18.3.     Facilitate communication between the council and the community on cycling, walking, and equestrian matters on the Kāpiti Coast, and

18.4.     Make recommendations to the Group Manager Place and Space and to Council on new opportunities and CWB matters.

SCOPE OF ACTIVITY

19. The Advisory Group will:

19.1.     Establish relationships with key community organisations with which this Advisory Group must work

19.2.     Provide focus and advise of priorities for CWB in the Kāpiti Coast District

19.3.     Advise Council officers in the implementation of priorities and projects particularly with respect to community perspective and input

19.4.     Advise on projects and recommend funding allocation to the Kāpiti Coast District Council through the delegated Council Committee and corporate planning processes

19.5.     Consider and make recommendations to the delegated Council Committee and/or the Chief Executive on involvement in relation to events, issues, reports, plans and subdivisions in relation to encouraging cycling, walking and horse riding on the Kāpiti Coast as required

19.6.     Participate in Council-led public consultation processes

19.7.     Work with officers to report to the delegated Council Committee on activities at the end of each financial year and/or as required during the financial year to scheduled meetings of that Committee, and

19.8.     Through the Chairperson, advise the Group Manager Place and Space of any other issues of concern that need to be addressed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Advisory Group

PROCESS

20. The process for raising and addressing matters through the Group is outlined in Appendix A.

 

 

 

 

SIGNATORIES

 

 

 

………………………………………………………

Bruce Henderson
Chair, Cycleways, Walkways and Bridleways Group

 

 

 

………………………………………………………

James Jefferson
Group Manager Place and Space


APPENDIX A


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

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Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

8.4         Finance Report as at 31 December 2019

Author:                    Jacinta Straker, Chief Financial Officer

Authoriser:             Mark de Haast, Group Manager

 

Purpose of Report

1        This report sets out Kāpiti Coast District Council’s (Council) financial performance and financial position for the quarter ended 31 December 2019 – the second quarter of the 2019/20 year - with explanations of key results and variances.

Delegation

2        The Strategy and Operations Committee (Committee) has delegated authority to consider this report under the 2019-2022 Triennium Governance Structure and Delegations in Section B.2. - Monitoring and decision-making on all broader financial management matters.  Key responsibilities will include financial management, including risk mitigation.

Background

3        The Committee is provided with information on nine broad areas of financial performance each quarter. 

Part A:        Statement of Comprehensive Revenue and Expense

Part B:        Statement of Financial Position

Part C:       Statement of Cash Flows

Part D:       Summary of Rates Funding

Part E:        Water Account Statement

Part F:        Capital Spending Programme

Part G:       Outstanding Rates Debt

Part H:       Treasury Management

Part I:         Asset Revaluation


 

 

Executive Summary

 

4        Operational spending: While our operational spending was lower than projected for the first two quarters, there is still considerable pressure on the Council’s budget. 

5        Ongoing prioritisation: We will continue to prioritise the work programme and funding that is needed across different activities to move the organisation forward, and will provide the Committee with updates and more detailed plans over the next two quarters.

6        Decisions regarding reprioritisation of existing funding for both capital and operational spending will be required in the coming two quarters for a number of areas. We are currently forecasting that the Council may need to spend up to an additional $1 million to meet our rates funded operating requirements for the year.

7        These include additional depreciation costs to reflect increasing asset replacement costs and additional spending for: our property asset management improvement programme, including condition assessments for our buildings; increased remuneration for elected members in line with recommendations from the Remuneration Authority; work to understand the housing issues in the district and meeting the cost of resourcing across many areas of Council.

8        Capital spending: During 2018/19, we committed to reviewing our 2019/20 capital spending programme and we are now currently forecasting to spend $6.9 million less in 2019/20 than originally planned. The majority of this is due to the intention to carry forward $6.4 million of the funding for the drinking water safety and resilience project to future years. Delays in the establishment of the Water Professional Services Panel in 2018/19 to enable a strategic procurement review delayed the awarding of the contract for the project and although the design work is progressing well, construction is now planned to start in 2020/21.

 

 


Part A: Statement of Comprehensive Revenue and Expense

 

9        The statement of comprehensive revenue and expense covers all of the Council's revenue and expenditure for the reporting period.

10      The net position of revenue less expenditure provides the operating surplus or deficit for the reporting period.

11      Table 1 below outlines the Council’s actual revenue and expenses for the second quarter ended 31 December 2019, including our full year budget and forecast for 2019/20.

 

 

Financial performance summary

12      The Council’s December year to date net operating surplus is $811,000 favourable to budget. This is mainly due to Council spending less in the first half of the year in areas such as personnel, maintenance and general expenses. 

13      While our spending was lower for the first half of the year, we expect the full budget to have been spent by the end of the financial year. Decisions regarding reprioritisation of existing funding for both capital and operational spending will be required in the coming two quarters for a number of areas. We are currently forecasting that the Council may need to spend up to an additional $1 million to meet our rates funded operating requirements for the year.

14      The unrealised loss on revaluation of financial derivatives of $1.85 million reflects continued softening of market interest rates since 30 June 2019, compared to Council’s committed financial derivatives.  This revaluation needs to be shown in our financial statements but it is not a real loss as there is no intention to prematurely terminate these commitments.

15      Council’s across New Zealand use financial derivatives to “fix” their interest rates rather than relying on floating interest rates, so as to provide more certainty over cash flows and protection against adverse movements in market rates.

Revenue performance - commentary

16      Rates

Description

Rates include all rates earned by the Council, including water rates. Rates remissions and rates billed to Council-owned properties are excluded.

Variance Analysis

Minor variance, additional revenue forecast for the year.

 

Rates revenue for the second quarter is on track. We expect the full year result to be $75,000 higher due to additional property developments finalised in June 2019 after the rates were set.

 

17      Fees and charges

Description

Fees and charges includes all non-rates revenue earned by the Council for providing services to the community. This also includes fines and penalties charged.

Variance Analysis

Minor variance, additional revenue forecast for the year.

 

18      Grants and subsidies

Description

Includes grants received by the Council for operating and capital spending. The majority of grants revenue is received from NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) for their share of our roading maintenance and capital investment.

Variance Analysis

Moderate variance, additional revenue forecast for the year.

 

The additional income received so far is due to NZTA funded projects such as Kāpiti Road & reseal starting early than planned.

 

The additional income forecast for the year is due to advanced NZTA projects such as Ratanui roundabout and Kāpiti Road widening, attracting additional subsidy from NZTA of $831,000.

 

NZTA also agreed to pay the Council $100,000 in lieu of undertaking lining works on several stormwater pipes they installed as part of the overall project. This was not included in the 2019/20 Annual Plan.

 

In the previous triennium, the Council authorised the Chief Executive to reassign this unbudgeted revenue of $100,000 to help fund the costs of the unbudgeted independent organisational review.

 

19      Development and financial contributions

Description

Development contributions are levied under the Local Government Act 2002 and cover all key activities except reserves and are also levied on developers at the time of subdivision. Developers’ contributions to Council works are treated as revenue. 

 

Financial contributions are levied under the Resource Management Act and cover reserves contributions levied on developers at the time of subdivision.

Variance Analysis

Significant variance for this quarter, on track for year end.

The lower revenue of $570,000 in this quarter is mostly due to a decision by the Council to accept the proposal for the Ngarara Waimeha Development in Waikanae to develop and provide a pocket park as part of their development, instead of paying the reserve contributions as originally planned.

Two significant developments have applied for their subdivision certification in February which has increased the total development and financial contributions to $1.9 million.

 

20      Other operating revenue

Description

Includes assets vested to the Council, local government petrol tax, donations and/or sponsorship and realised gains on asset disposals. Note also, that the value of land vested to the Council as part of subdivision activity in any year is recorded as revenue in that year.

Variance Analysis

Moderate variance, additional revenue forecast for the year.

 

The additional $197,000 of income received is mainly due to the Council successfully securing unbudgeted funding of $90,000 from MBIE to assist the Council in continuing to encourage responsible camping in the district, $40,000 from the provincial growth fund, $18,000 from Greater Wellington Regional Council towards the costs of our population forecast online platform, and $20,000 funding from the contractor as part of the Otaki Beach Pump Station project.

 

21      Interest income

Description

Interest income represents the Council’s earnings on its term deposits, overnight cash deposits and borrower notes held by the Local Government Funding Agency.

Variance Analysis

Minor variance, lower income forecast for the year.

 

The lower income primarily relates to lower deposit rates and this is offset by lower interest expense.

 

Expenditure performance - commentary

22      Personnel, maintenance and operations

Description

Includes personnel expenses, maintenance, business-as-usual Council operating expenses, internal recoveries, grants and other sundry expenses.

Variance Analysis

Significant variance for this quarter, additional spending planned for the year.

 

Although Council spending in this category is tracking below budget by

$842,000 for the first half of the year, the expectation is that we will spend an additional $1.3 million by year end due primarily to additional spending for:

·    our property asset management improvement programme, including condition assessments for our buildings;

·    increased remuneration for elected members in line with recommendations from the remuneration authority;

·    work to understand the housing issues in the district;

·    unbudgeted independent organisational review. This is partially offset by additional unbudgeted revenue from the M2PP projects of $100,000 as discussed above; and

·    meeting current resourcing needs across many areas of Council.

 

23      Depreciation and amortisation

Description

Depreciation reflects the use of our property, plant and equipment and intangible assets currently owned by the Council.

Variance Analysis

Moderate variance for this quarter, additional depreciation is forecast for the year.

Additional depreciation for the full year mainly due to:

·    NZTA connector roads such as Hadfield Road planned for 2021/22 were vested from NZTA during 2018/19.

·    The final revaluation of roading assets as at 30 June 2019 was higher than planned, resulting in  higher depreciation.

 

24      Finance expense

Description

Interest is incurred on borrowings.

Variance Analysis

The lower finance expense is due to the Council finishing the year last year with lower net borrowings and due our lower average cost of borrowings.

 

Items reported below the line - commentary

25      Unrealised gain / (loss) on revaluation of derivatives

Description:

1.   The Council recognises its interest rate swaps at fair value on a monthly basis.

2.   The change in fair value between 30 June 2019 and 31 December 2019 is treated as either an unrealised gain (fair value has decreased) or an unrealised loss (fair value has increased).

Variance Analysis

Major variance but no impact on rates funding required.

The unrealised loss on revaluation of financial derivatives of $1.85 million reflects the softening of market interest rates compared to Council’s committed financial derivatives.  This revaluation needs to be shown in our financial statements but it is not a real loss as there is no intention to prematurely terminate these commitments.

 

(See Part H: Treasury Management for further information).

 


 




Part B: Statement of Financial Position

 

26      The Council’s financial position as at 31 December 2019 and full year forecast and budget are set out in Table 2, followed by a summary of the key variances.

 

Year to date summary

27      The Council’s only material changes to its financial position since 30 June 2019 were in respect to other financial assets and gross borrowings.

28      During the quarter, Council has issued $25 million of new debt towards prefunding the April 2020, October 2020 and May 2021 debt maturities. The funds were placed on term deposit, at the most favourable rates available in the market, as part of Council’s prefunding programme. (see part H: Treasury management).

29      $20 million of long term debt matured during September 2019 that was fully funded through the prefunding programme and repaid from term deposits maturing on the day.

 

 

Full year forecast summary

30      We have reviewed our capital works programme and we now plan to spend $6.9 million less on renewing and upgrading our assets (See part F: Capital Spending Programme for further information). Net borrowings are forecast to be lower than budget at year end at $153.8 million.

31      Derivative financial instruments are currently forecast to be $6.6 million higher than budget. This is mainly due to the fall in fixed interest rate swap rates since the Annual Plan budget was set in March 2019.





Part C: Statement of Cash Flows

 

32      The Council’s cash flow for the quarter ended 31 December 2019 and full year forecast and budget are set out in Table 3, followed by a summary of key variances.

 

Year to Date Summary

33      The Council’s material changes to its cash flow management for the quarter ended 31 December 2019 were:

·        $20 million of long term debt matured during September 2019.

·        $25 million of new debt was issued towards prefunding the April 2020, October 2020 and May 2021 debt maturities. The full amount was placed on term deposit, as part of Council’s prefunding programme.

·        $25 million of term deposits matured ($20 million was prefunded for the repayment of the September 2019 debt maturity and $5 million of surplus cash that was placed on fixed deposit for final payment of the 2018/19 capital works programme).

·        $10.88 million was paid towards the Council’s capital expenditure programme.






Part D: Summary of Rates Funding

 

34      The summary of rates funding covers the Council’s revenue and expenses that are funded by rates. It is a sub-set of the statement of comprehensive revenue and expense on page 2 which covers all of the Council’s operating revenue and expenses. 

35      Table 4 below details the actual rates funding surplus/(deficit) for the quarter ending 31 December 2019.

 

 

36      Operational spending: While our operational spending was lower than projected for the first two quarters, there is still considerable pressure on the Council’s budget. 

37      Ongoing prioritisation: We will continue to prioritise the work programme and funding that is needed across different activities to move the organisation forward, and will provide the committee with updates and more detailed plans over the next two quarters.

38      Decisions regarding reprioritisation of existing funding will be required in the coming quarters for a number of areas as we are currently forecasting that the council may need to spend up to an additional $1 million to meet our rates funded operating requirements for the year.

39      These include additional depreciation costs to reflect increasing asset replacement costs and additional spending for: our property asset management improvement programme, including condition assessments for our buildings; increased remuneration for elected members in line with recommendations from the Remuneration Authority; work to understand the housing issues in the district and meeting the cost of resourcing across many areas of Council.



Part E: Water Account Statement

 

40      Since water meters were introduced in 2014, the total operational cost of supplying potable water, which includes reticulation and treatment, and the rates we have received, has been tracked as part of the water account.  The water account is a closed account. This means that any surpluses will be held within the account to fund future costs of providing water. Conversely, any deficits need to be recovered from future water charges.

41      Water usage has taken a number of years to normalise since districtwide water meter charging for all residential properties commenced from July 2014. Therefore, the Council has carefully monitored usage trends to best determine what charges are necessary to fully recover the total costs of providing a treated water supply over a rolling 5-year period.

42      The Council’s water revenue year to date is tracking to budget.

 

43      The table below outlines the water account position. As shown, we are planning to reduce the overall water account deficit from $0.5 million to $0.3 million by the end of the financial year. Further work will be done during the development of the 2021/21 Annual Plan and the following 2021-41 LTP to assess when the water account is likely to be fully funded.

 

 

 




Part F: Capital Spending Programme

 

44      A summary of our capital spending programme for 2019/20 is shown by activity against the full year forecast and full year budget in Table 6 below.


45      We have completed $11.6 million of work renewing and upgrading the Council’s assets so far this year.

46      During 2018/19 we committed to reviewing the capital programme to ensure it was deliverable and we are now currently forecasting to spend $28.4 million for the year, which is $7 million less than originally planned.

47      The majority of this reduction is due to the intention to move $6.4 million of the funding for the drinking water safety and resilience project (DWSRP) to future years. This was due to delays in the establishment of the Water Professional Services Panel in 2018/19 to allow for a strategic procurement review. Those delays held back the awarding of the contract for the DWSRP and although the design work is progressing well the construction work is now planned to start in 2020/21.


 

48      Draft carry forwards are:

2020/21

$

Coastlands Aquatic centre

48,000

Escarpment

201,000

Otaki Beach development

333,000

Self-Insurance fund

510,000

Districtwide access system

120,000

2021/22

$

Drinking water Safety and resilience

6,410,000

 

49      In the economic development activity, the majority of the additional spending relates to work on Kāpiti Road for the completion of the shared path and widening of the road which has received additional funding from NZTA.

50      Detailed information about spending variations at the activity level are included in the Activity Reports 1 July – 31 December 2019 that is also part of the agenda for the Strategy and Operations Committee meeting on 5 March 2020.

 






Part G:  Outstanding Rates Debt as at 31 December 2019

 

51      As part of the wider strategy of continuing to reduce the Council’s debt, we need to ensure that everyone is paying their property and water rates.

52      Like a number of other councils around the country, we are now using the services of a local government shared services agency, Debt Management Central (DMC), to assist our team with collecting outstanding rates debts.

53      This framework for recovery of unpaid rates is set out in the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002. DMC is working within the provisions of our rating policy and following our internal debt collection processes.

Improved collection of outstanding property rates

54      The total property rates outstanding as at 31 December 2019 was $2.38 million, which was a slight increase of 2.2% from this time last year (30 September 2019: $2.12 million).

55      DMC and Council’s debt collection staff have worked with ratepayers to set up workable payment arrangements.  Where a payment arrangement has not been agreed, and provided the property is subject to a mortgage, Council has issued mortgagee notifications where appropriate.

56      DMC will continue to work with our debt collection team during the 2019/20 year to collect outstanding rates, enabling the Council to reduce its borrowing levels.

57      The graph below shows a comparison of the $851,000 of rate arrears outstanding as at 31 December 2019 and for the previous three years.

 

58      The graph below details the rates arrears of $851,000 by property use/type. The majority of the total rate arrears are from residential and lifestyle properties.

 

59      The rates arrears from Māori freehold land are rates owed to the Greater Wellington Regional Council.

60      There are a small number of properties with significant outstanding arrears over a number of years. We will follow the process prescribed in the legislation for collection of this long outstanding debt.  Updates will be provided to the Committee over the coming months.

Improved collection of outstanding water rates

61      A total of $417,000 of water rates is overdue as at 31 December 2019, which is a 24% reduction from the same time last year ($548,000 as at 31 December 2018). This significant reduction is due to the focus on collection by Council over the last year in partnership with DMC.

 

62      Water rates payments received are first applied to water rate arrears. The chart below reflects the overdue and not-yet-due water rates as at 31 December 2019, 30 September 2019 and 31 December 2018.

63      The graph below details the total water rates outstanding by property use/type. The majority of the outstanding water rates are from residential properties.

64      $252,000 or 60% of outstanding water rates relate to individual debtor balances of less than $500.

65      Table 7 below details the total rate remissions approved to 31 December 2019 against the year to date budget. Applications for rates assistance were posted to eligible property owners in December 2019, and we processed first batch of applications in February 2020.

66      Rates assistance grants are funded by rates and are a unique level of additional support provided by our Council to assist households in need. Further detail on the eligibility criteria can be found in the Council’s rates remission policy.

67      Year to date, central government rates rebates have been granted for 1,758 Kāpiti properties totalling $1.07 million. The Council provides the approved rates rebate (up to $640 per rateable property) to the successful applicants and recovers the costs directly from the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA).

68      The Council actively promotes the Government rates rebate and remissions on radio, Facebook and through advertisements in the local papers and has worked with Grey Power and the Older Persons’ Council to promote remissions and rebates more widely.

69      Kāpiti was one of three councils invited to take part in an online rates rebate trial during June 2019 with the DIA.  The other councils involved in the trial were Tauranga and Hutt City.  The online application was being trialled as an alternative to the current paper form, allowing customers to complete and submit an application at home without the need to provide supporting income information.  Customers were still required to come into Council to have their application and declaration witnessed. There is a Bill currently before Parliament, the Rates Rebate (Statutory Declarations) Amendment Bill, which proposes to remove the requirement to sign a statutory declaration and have it witnessed.  Council have submitted in support generally noting that there would need to be an alternative way to verify information provided if the statutory declaration was removed.

 


Part H: Treasury Management

 

Summary

70      We talk about our borrowings as gross and net. Gross is the total and net is what we owe less our financial assets – essentially the cash and term deposits we hold to repay borrowings. To make sure we can always cover repayments when they are due, we start to build up funds in advance of the due date and put those funds into term deposits. Our net borrowings therefore reflect the true position of what we owe.

71      The graph below shows how our total borrowings break down into gross and net. It also shows our strategy to keep below 200% of operating income – represented by the green line. Currently our borrowings are forecast to be 185.9% of our operating income at the end of June. Looking at borrowing against income shows how well an organisation (or even an individual) is placed to handle and repay borrowings in the future.

72      It is one of the key measures used by Standard & Poor’s when they assess our credit rating. While we could borrow more (up to 240% as outlined in our treasury management policy and shown by the orange dotted line), we chose to limit our borrowings to 200% of operating income and that becomes our ‘green line’. This approach is so we can afford to replace significant water and wastewater infrastructure in the future.

73      The table below shows the Council’s net borrowings as at 31 December 2019 against full year budget and the prior year.

 

74      $20 million of long term borrowings matured during September 2019. This was repaid using a term deposit that had been built up over the last 18 months in advance of the maturity.  This ensures there is adequate funding available when borrowings mature. We call this prefunding and it is a key tool used by the Council to manage our liquidity risk or risk that we may not have access to funding when we need it.

75      During the past quarter Council has issued $25 million of new debt towards prefunding the April 2020, October 2020 and May 2021 debt maturities.

76      The table below shows the movement in the Council’s debt balance for the past six months.

 


 

 

77      As at 31 December 2019, the Council had $61.08 million of cash, term deposits and borrower notes on hand. This is broken down as follows:

78      The Reserve Bank of New Zealand cut the official cash rate (OCR) by 0.25% to 1.0% in August 2019, with no change to the rate in the following announcements.

79      The Council’s weighted average cost of borrowing for the quarter ended 31 December 2019 was 4.29% compared to the budget of 4.8%.

Treasury policy limits

80      The treasury management policy (Policy) contains three financial ratios with either a maximum or minimum policy limit.

81      The Policy sets the maximum limit for the ratio of net interest expense to total operating revenue of 20%. The following chart shows actual limits achieved for each quarter.


82      The Policy sets the minimum limit for the liquidity ratio of 110%. This is a measure of the Council's available financial facilities compared to its current debt levels. The chart below shows actual limits achieved for each quarter.

83      The policy sets the maximum limit for net debt to operating income of 240%. This is a measure of the Council’s ability to repay its debt from the operating revenue it receives during a given financial year.

 

 

 

 


 


Part I: Asset Revaluation

 

84      The Council’s asset valuations are performed with sufficient regularity to ensure the carrying amounts are maintained at fair value. All valuations are performed by independent qualified valuers.

85      By maintaining asset values at fair value, the Council ensures that it best achieves intergenerational equity whereby ratepayers pay their fair share, and only their fair share, of the assets they use and benefit from.

86      From 1 July 2015, Council transitioned to an annual rolling asset revaluation programme as set out below. We have previously completed asset revaluations as at 30 June each year. Officers have reviewed this process and asset revaluations will now be completed as at 31 March each year, to ensure that there is more certainty about the impact of the revaluation on future years’ depreciation charges and rates revenue requirements.

Asset classification

Revaluation date

 

Subsequent revaluation

Land and buildings (including land under roads revaluations)

31 Mar 2020

Every three years thereafter

Parks and reserves structures

31 Mar 2020

Every three years thereafter

Water, wastewater and stormwater (including seawalls and river control)

31 Mar 2020

Every two years thereafter

Roading and bridges, (excluding land under roads)

31 Mar 2021

Every two years thereafter

 

87      For the 2019/20 revaluation programme we have engaged WSP New Zealand Ltd (formerly Opus) to complete the 3 waters revaluation.  Aon NZ Ltd have also been engaged for the revaluation of Council’s land, buildings, parks and land under road assets.

88      Both valuers provided Council with a draft revaluation in November 2019 to start the due diligence on the changes in unit rates and asset data analysis and to inform the initial draft of the 2020/21 Annual Plan.  The final revaluation will be completed for the third quarter finance update to the Committee.

Considerations

Policy considerations

89      There are no policy implications arising from this report.

Legal considerations

90      There are no legal considerations arising from this report. 

Financial considerations

91      The financial information as detailed in Parts A to I of this report is unaudited. Best endeavours have been made by all Council officers to ensure the accuracy, completeness and robustness of the financial information contained herein as at the time of issuance of this report.

Tāngata whenua considerations

92      There are no tāngata whenua considerations arising from this report.

 

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

93      This matter has a low level of significance under the Council Policy.

Publicity

94      There are no publicity considerations arising from this report.

Recommendations

95      That the Strategy and Operations Committee notes the actual financial performance and position of the Council for the quarter ended 31 December 2019.

 

 

Appendices

Nil

 

Approved for submission

 

 

Jacinta Straker

Chief Financial Officer


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

8.5         QUARTERLY ACTIVITY REPORT

Author:                    Marece Wenhold, Senior Advisor

Authoriser:             Mark de Haast, Group Manager

 

Purpose of Report

1        This report provides the Strategy and Operations Committee with a quarterly performance overview for the second quarter of the 2019/20 financial year for each activity published in the 2018-38 Long Term Plan.

Delegation

2        This The Strategy and Operations Committee has delegated authority to consider this report under the responsibilities delegated in Section B.1 of Governance Structure and Delegations.  In particular, the Committee’s key responsibilities include:

·    Overviewing strategic programmes;

·    Financial management, including risk mitigation.

 

Background

3        This report is a summary of work programme and activity reports. Further and more detailed information is included in Appendix A:

·    Appendix A contains detailed activity chapters which present an overview of performance across a range of projects and work programmes, recent developments in those activities and performance against key performance measures published in the 2018–38 long term plan.

4        Section 1 of this report gives an overview of progress on projects and results for key performance indicators (KPIs) across the Council as a whole.

5        Section 2 reports on the ‘Across Council Work Programmes’.

6        Sections 3 to 6 reports on the activity cluster groupings. These sections report on the status of projects (with a brief explanation where projects are not on target), present other key development highlights and provide more detail on KPI performance.

7        The dashboard graphic on the following page gives a snapshot of performance across all Council activities and is intended to highlight at a glance where there might be issues that need attention.


 

Activity overview dashboard for the second quarter 2019/20


Considerations

Section 1: Overview of KPIs and Projects

Summary of significant projects

8        There are 19 significant projects being undertaken by Council in the activities reported below (compared to 29 last year). Of these, 17 are capital expenditure projects with a value of $250,000 and above and two are additional significant projects.[1]

Figure 1: Status summary of significant projects

                as at 31 December 2019

9        Thirteen projects were on target as at 31 December 2019.

10      Six projects were not on target for a range of reasons. These are reported on in the activity chapters in Appendix A.

Summary of key performance indicators

11      There are 93 KPIs which have targets this year. Figure 2 below reports on KPI results against their targets.

Figure 2: Key Performance Indicators

               as at 31 December 2019

12      Two KPIs were achieved and fifty-one were on target at the end of the first quarter. Of the remainder, 33 were not yet due and seven were not on target. These are reported in more detail in the activity chapters in Appendix A.

 

Section 2: Across Council Work Programmes

13      There are several programmes of work that carry across a number of activities. These are outlined below, and their progress is discussed in more detail in the ‘Across Council Work Programmes’ chapter in Appendix A.

 

·    Provincial Growth Fund.  Supporting the development and implementation of Provincial Growth Fund applications for the Council and the Kāpiti community.

·    Housing work programme.  Defining an implementation strategy for Council to progress housing supply across the District including physical assets and advocacy work streams on behalf of the local community.

·    Coastal adaptation work programme.  Developing a regional approach to community-led coastal adaptation under the umbrella of the Wellington Region Climate Change Working Group’s coastal adaptation sub-group.

·    Corporate IT projects.  The hardware programme includes servers, desktops, laptops, mobile phones, internal network, digital radio network across the district and the CCTV network.

·    Carbon and energy management.  Adopted in 2012, the Council’s Carbon and Energy Management Plan sets a target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the organisation by 2021/22 compared to 2009/10, through energy conservation, renewable energy, reducing fossil fuel use and changing how waste is disposed of. The Council has its annual emissions inventory (carbon footprint) independently audited to gain ‘CEMARS’ accreditation to the ISO-14064 standard.


 

 

icon-communitySection 3: Place & Space

Significant projects

14      There are four Place and Space projects, all of which are capital expenditure over $250,000 projects.

Figure 3: Place & Space – significant projects

               as at 31 December 2019

 

15      Three projects were on target as at 31 December 2019.

16      The Districtwide Parks and Playgrounds work programme is a capex (over $250k) project and is on target.

17      The Housing for Older Person’s renewals project is forecast to overspend the initial budget, largely as a result of urgent remediation needed to the Wipata Flats in Paekākāriki and as a consequence of the previous Council giving direction to renew units when they became vacant.

18      There are two economic development projects reported in this activity report (the Strategic Land Purchase Fund and the Town Centres project).  We have reported on the Elevate Ōtaki project developments. This is not included as a Council project as Council is providing resource and funding support for the project but is not managing it.

Other projects & key developments

19      There are 12 minor projects for Recreation and Leisure for 2019/20.

20      Parks and Open Space has three minor projects for 2019/20: districtwide beams and seating, Paraparaumu/Raumati Escarpment and Ōtaki Beach development.

21      Community facilities and support has 9 minor projects for 2019/20.

22      Key developments in Economic Development include the Economic Development Strategy Refresh, filming requests, major events fund, Kāpiti Destination Story update and the Kāpiti Youth Employment Foundation (Work Ready Kāpiti).

 


 

Key performance indicators

23      In this cluster there are 38 KPIs.

Figure 4: Place & Space KPIs

                

·        Two KPIs were achieved at the end of the first quarter of 2019/20.

·        Thirteen KPIs were on target.

·        Three KPIs were not on target.

·        Twenty KPIs were not yet due, largely because their results are determined by surveys not undertaken until the third and fourth quarters of the year. One KPI is for monitoring only.


 

icon-infrastructureSection 4: Infrastructure

 

Significant projects

24      There are 13 Infrastructure projects, 12 of which are capital expenditure over $250,000 projects.

Figure 5: Infrastructure Projects

                

         

25      Nine projects were on target as at 31 December 2019.

26      There are four significant projects in the Access & Transport activity. Three are on target. The SH1 Revocation project is behind time and forecast to underspend its budget.

27      For Stormwater, both projects (Major and Minor stormwater programmes) are broadly on target despite some consenting delays with individual projects within those programmes. This has been addressed by bringing forward other works that don’t require consents.

28      For Wastewater, The Paraparaumu Wastewater Treatment Plant renewals: Additional works required above originally planned works following the clarifier failure. The Ōtaki Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade projects is forecasting an overspend.

29      There are two water management projects. Both are over $250,000 capex projects. The Drinking Water Safety and Resilience Programme is not on target – design work will be completed this year but construction works are now planned for next year.


 

Key performance indicators

30      In this cluster there are 40 KPIs with assigned targets to report against this year.

Figure 6: Infrastructure KPIs

                  

·        Twenty-nine KPIs were on target at the end of the first quarter.

·        Nine KPIs have results which are not yet due, typically because they’re only measured at the end of the year.

·        Two KPIs were not on target:

i).    One Access and transport KPI was not on target:

’Residents (%) who are satisfied with street lighting’ reported a provisional result from the first and second quarter’s Resident Opinion Survey of 83.5% satisfied against a target of 85% (the result for 2018/19 year was 85%).

ii).   One Solid Waste KPI was not on target:

‘Residents who are satisfied with the waste minimisation education, information and advice available’ reported a provisional satisfaction result of 65% in the first and second quarter’s Resident Opinion Survey, against a target of 75% for the year.


 

icon-planning-regulatorySection 5: Planning & Regulatory

Significant projects

31      There is one significant Regulatory Services project, the Animal Management Centre renewal. It is forecast to cost more than initially budgeted as investigation found some hidden issues with the building.

32      The District Plan Review is the only significant Districtwide Planning project and is on track for year end.

Key performance indicators

33      In this cluster there are nine KPIs.

Figure 7: Regulatory Services KPIs

 

·        Six KPIs were on target at the end of the second quarter and two were not yet due.

·        One KPI was not on target: 2,2375 of 2,528 service requests received in the second quarter were responded to within time. In the year to date 4,756 of 5,040 service requests received were responded to within time.

 

 

 


 

icon-governance-tangatawhenuaSection 6: Governance and Tāngata Whenua

Significant projects

34      There are no significant projects in this activity in 2019/20.

Key performance indicators

35      There are six KPIs in this stand-alone activity.

Figure 8: Governance & Tāngata Whenua KPIs

·        Three KPIs were on target at the end of the second quarter.

·        Three KPIs were not yet due.

Policy considerations

36      There are no policy issues to consider.

Legal considerations

37      Under the Local Government Act 2002, the Council has a legislative responsibility to monitor and report on the Council’s organisational performance.

Financial considerations

38      A summary of budget details for each activity (as at 31 December 2019) is provided in the activity chapters attached as Appendix A to this report.

Tāngata whenua considerations

39      There are no tāngata whenua issues to consider in regard to this report.

40      There is reporting on issues of interest to iwi and tāngata whenua throughout this report, not limited to the Governance and tāngata whenua section of this report or the activity chapter contained in Appendix A. However, this report is for information about recent developments only and is not calling for any decision.

Strategic considerations

41      There are no specific strategic considerations in this report. The developments outlined in this report and the attached Appendix A contribute in various ways to Council’s ten-year outcomes. However, it is not the aim of this report to explore those contributions.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

42      This matter has a low level of significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Consultation already undertaken

43      This is a report for information only – no consultation is required.

Publicity

44      Many of the developments referred to in this report have already been communicated through the Council’s regular communications channels.

45      Performance outcomes for the year will be published in the Annual Report 2019/20.

 

Recommendations

46      That the Strategy and Operations Committee notes the content of this Activity Report for the second quarter of 2019/20 and the further work programme and project performance, other key developments and KPI results contained in the activity chapters attached as Appendix A to this report.

 

 

Appendices

1.       Appendix A  

 


Strategy and Operations Committee Meeting Agenda

5 March 2020

 

 

•	Across Council Work Programmes
•	Place and Space cluster
•	Infrastructure cluster
•	Regulatory Services cluster
•	Governance and Tāngata Whenua

Appendix A – Across Council Work Programmes Chapter (1 October to 31 December 2019)

 

Across Council Work Programmes

 


There are several programmes of work that extend across two or more activity areas.  To present the reporting on these programmes of work more cohesively, they will be reported on in this ‘Across Council Work Programmes’ section rather than in separate activity reports.

 

These programmes of work are:

 

·    Provincial Growth Fund

·    Housing Work Programme

·    Coastal Adaptation Work Programme

·    Council-wide Corporate Information Technology Projects

·    Carbon and Energy Management.


 

Appendix A – Across Council Work Programmes Chapter (1 October to 31 December 2019)

Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) Work Programme

Description

This work programme supports the development and implementation of Provincial Growth Fund applications for the Council and the Kāpiti community. 

Lead

Senior Leadership Team

Key developments for 1 October to 31 December 2019

1.    Economic Development Strategy update provided to the District Leaders Group and the Regional Advisory Group on 1 October 2019.

2.    Worked closely with the Provincial Development Unit Senior Regional Official and Senior Regional Advisor to identify priority areas in Kāpiti for the Provincial Growth Fund.

3.    Provided continuous support and advice to organisations developing applications to the Provincial Growth Fund.

4.    Progressed concept development for Council-led opportunities identified as a priority, including:

·   TRC Tourism engaged to update and strengthen the 2013 Gateway Centre feasibility study, working alongside partners and stakeholders, with draft report presented for feedback.

·   Jacobs engaged to review the Programme Business Case for the East-West Connection.

·   Grant application submitted to the One Billion Trees fund.

5.    Commenced process of recruiting for the Principal Advisor Growth and Development role, and signed PGF agreement for the funding of this.

Risks (to programme, cost, quality, other)

National PGF landscape – as the PGF progresses through its final year, significant levels of funding have already been allocated and the overall portfolio of required priority investment is becoming more refined, creating a higher bar for success.

Issues (for elected member attention)

None to report.

 


 

Appendix A – Across Council Work Programmes Chapter (1 October to 31 December 2019)

Housing Work Programme

Description

This work programme defines the implementation strategy for Council to progress housing supply across the District including physical assets and advocacy work streams on behalf of the local community

Lead

People and Partnerships Group

Key developments for 1 October to 31 December 2019

1.   The Property Group Limited (TPG) completed a draft Housing Programme Assessment Report for the Kāpiti Coast district, which investigates the options Council has to influence housing issues in the district including:

·   Confirmation of the district’s housing continuum opportunities and constraints,

·   Proposed actions to enable the opportunities and mitigate the constraints,

·   Measurable outcomes to support Council and stakeholders reach consensus on supporting areas of housing in need in the district,

·   The findings of this work will inform the next steps for Council to consider establishing a housing programme.

2.   This report was informed by engagement with over 80 stakeholders from the Kāpiti district who are part of the sector. 

3.   A draft report outlining the current state and options to consider for the work programme was consulted with SLT, Councillors and stakeholders in August and September 2019.

4.   Following feedback, a final draft report was completed in late 2019 including a prioritisation schedule for the work to establish a housing programme.

Forthcoming milestones:

The report will then be finalised and presented back to Council in March 2020.

Risks (to programme, cost, quality, other)

1.      Council’s role in the housing sector is not consistently understood.

2.      The Council’s reputation is eroded by the perceived lack action on addressing housing issues in the district.

3.      The proposed options are not supported by Council and there are delays to establish the work programme.

Issues (for elected member attention)

None to report.

 

 


 

Appendix A – Across Council Work Programmes Chapter (1 October to 31 December 2019)

Coastal Adaptation Work Programme

Description

This work programme comprises the development of a regional approach to community-led coastal adaptation under the umbrella of the Wellington Region Climate Change Working Group’s coastal adaptation sub-group.

Lead

Regulatory Services Group

Key developments for 1 October to 31 December 2019

1.    First of a series of co-design workshop for the community assessment panel approach took place on 6 December 2019.

2.    Planning communication and engagement for Phase One of the programme developed. This includes planning for a one-day Coastal Summit to launch the project.

3.    Engagement with iwi-partners on the project established.

4.    Advisors appointed to the Coastal Team to support delivery.

Upcoming milestones

5.    Further co-design workshops with key stakeholders planned for Q3 and 4.

6.    Commission work to understand what additional technical and science information may be needed to inform the work of the community assessment panel(s).

7.    Finalise scope of iwi-partnership and co-design of the community-led coastal adaptation process.

8.    Coastal Summit on 8 March to launch the project.

9.    Finalise programme of wider community engagement opportunities to support community awareness and understanding of issues, challenges and opportunities for community-led discussions relating to the impacts of sea level rise.

Risks (to programme, cost, quality, other)

1.      Due to the high degree of importance and significance to iwi, interested parties, and the wider community. It is important that iwi and the community has ample opportunity to provide input into the coastal adaptation process. If effective consultation, engagement and collaboration is not achieved; the aim of the project to be community-led and meet best practice recommendations from Ministry for the Environment will not be achieved. In addition, it may result in breach of undertakings made to involve the community in the coastal hazard work.

2.      If the community-led process and wider community engagement expands significantly (e.g. to meet community expectations) and Greater Wellington Regional Council is unable to contribute financially, there is likely to not be sufficient budget to complete the community-assessment panel process in 2020/21 financial year.

Issues (for elected member attention)

Upcoming opportunities for elected members to support this work, e.g. attendance at the Coastal Summit in March.


 

Appendix A – Across Council Work Programmes Chapter (1 October to 31 December 2019)


Information Technology (Hardware Renewals)

Description

The hardware programme includes servers, desktops, laptops, mobile phones, internal network, digital radio network across the district and the CCTV network.

Lead

Corporate Services

Key developments for 1 October to 31 December 2019

1.    Purchase of 10 new desktops, 18 laptops and 5 tablets to replace old equipment and complete the Windows 7 upgrade programme.

2.    Purchase of 20 new mobile phones to replace old equipment.

3.    Implemented a service level agreement for an ongoing maintenance programme to maintain and upgrade old CCTV cameras where necessary. There are currently 115 cameras across the district.

4.    Implemented new fibre circuits at both Civic and EOC buildings to support the relocation of our production server environment (see 5).

5.    We are moving our production server environment to a data centre located in Auckland as part of our Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) project. Three servers have been migrated initially for testing purposes with the production servers scheduled to begin moving in February 2020. This project will increase Councils resiliency and reduce risk by Council no longer maintaining our own production server hardware.

Upcoming milestones:

6.    Implementation of new fibre circuits to key Council sites across the district to support the IaaS project, these include Ōtaki  Library and Service Centre, Waikanae Library and Service Centre, Waikanae Water Treatment Plant and Coastlands Aquatic Centre.

7.    As per 5 above, migration of the production servers to the data centre located in Auckland is scheduled to commence in February 2020.

8.    The Councils phone system is now out of support and the project to replace it is scheduled to commence in February 2020. A registration of interest (ROI) was carried out last year for this project with Mitel being selected as the successful solution.

9.    CCTV cameras and Wi-Fi radio network equipment to be relocated from the Ōtaki  clock tower and the clock tower repaired by March 2020.

Risks (to programme, cost, quality, other)

1.    There are no risks to the current programme.

Issues (for elected member attention)

1.    Sourcing the pole for relocating the CCTV cameras and Wi-Fi network equipment from the Ōtaki  clock tower took a lot longer than anticipated unfortunately. Consideration was given to completing the move just prior to Christmas, however, it was decided to postpone until the new year so there would be no disruption to Christmas trade for retailers.

Current year project costs to 31 December 2019

Financial year

Year

Project
budget

$

Project costs
to date

$

Forecast project costs

$

Carry over

$

This year

2019/20

362,792

194,258

332,609

 

Information Technology (Software Upgrades)

Description

The software programme includes upgrading existing software applications where required along with projects that require new modules or new software applications.

Group

Corporate Services

Key developments for the 3 months to 31 December 2019

1.    In December two staff from Magiq Software were onsite at Council to provide training in using aspects of the Magiq software to both Environmental Standards and Resource Consents staff.

2.    Completed the implementation of Envibe software to manage the pools across the district. This project replaced the previous software (Class) which was no longer supported by the vendor.

Upcoming milestones:

3.    Upgrade of Magiq software to v4.26.

4.    Magiq training for finance staff scheduled for February.

5.    Release of a Request for Proposal (RFP) on GETS in January 2020 for Accounts Payable automation solution to streamline the accounts payable function within Finance. This will increase efficiency by reducing the manual steps required to processing monthly invoices.

Risks (to programme, cost, quality, other)

There are no risks to the current programme.

Issues (for elected member attention)

1.    The planned Magiq v4.26 software upgrade in December was postponed due to issues found with testing of the new version of software. The rescheduled date for the upgrade is 24th January subject to final testing being signed off by the project team.

2.    The minor forecast overspend in software is mainly due to the higher project cost than anticipated for the upgrade project to the Council chambers technology. This is however, offset by the forecasted underspend in the hardware renewal programme.

Current year project costs to 30 December 2019

Financial year

Year

Project
budget

$

Project costs
to date

$

Forecast project costs

$

Carry over

$

This year

2019/20

322,258

196,368

331,449

 

 


 

Appendix A – Across Council Work Programmes Chapter (1 October to 31 December 2019)

Carbon and Energy Management

Description

Adopted in 2012, the Council’s Carbon and Energy Management Plan sets a target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the organisation by 2021/22 compared to 2009/10, through energy conservation, renewable energy, reducing fossil fuel use and changing how waste is disposed of. The Council has its annual emissions inventory (carbon footprint) independently audited to gain ‘CEMARS’  accreditation to the ISO-14064 standard.

Lead

Infrastructure

Key developments for 1 October to 31 December 2019

The new sustainability and resilience team

1.    The previous Carbon and Energy management report (presented to the Strategy and Operations Committee on 5 December 2019) noted that additional resources were required to support Council’s decision of 23 May 2019 to pursue the goal of carbon neutrality by 2025.

2.    To that end, a new team, the Sustainability and Resilience team, was established in October 2019 within the Infrastructure Services Group. This team incorporates solid waste services and waste minimisation, carbon and energy management and the wider overview of climate change adaptation and mitigation in Infrastructure Services and across Council.

3.    The new manager started on 21 October 2019. This new role also covers some Civil Defence Emergency leadership functions, which will be reported on elsewhere in Across-Council work programmes. An exisiting staff member transferred to the new team into the role of Sustainability and Resilience Advisor in December 2019 to manage the carbon & energy management work stream. Two further staff, an additional waste minimisation officer and a projects support officer, were recruited in December 2019 and were due to start in January 2020. When they are on board the team will be at its full complement.

Electric vehicles

4.    Council now has an Electric Vehicle (EV) ‘fleet’. We purchased our second Nissan Leaf in early December 2019 and now have two EVs in the Civic building car pool. The new Leaf is a second-hand 2017 model, with only 4,500 km on the clock, and has a range of 180km (compared to the 120km range of our 2013 Leaf).

5.    Also in December 2019, the Mayor went for test drives in a Prius Prime (plug-in hybrid) and our new Nissan leaf. He has decided on the 2019/20 Nissan Leaf as his new Council vehicle.

The provisional 2018/19 GHG emissions result

6.    Due to the new team being set up in December the CEMARS audit for the 2018/19 year was postponed to 29-30 January. Note that with the renaming of the organisation earlier in 2019, the scheme itself has been renamed the ‘Carbon reduce’ scheme to align with their ‘Carbon zero’ scheme. Please also note that, at the time of writing this report, only a provisional result is available as although the on-site audit has been completed the final result remains to be verified by the external audit team. 

7.    These provisional findings are expected to be verified by late February 2020. A verbal report of the final verified findings will be made at the Strategy and Operations Committee meeting on 5 March 2020. In our experience, if the final result varies from the provisional result, it is typically by less than +/- 0.5%.

8.    The provisional result for 2018/19 shows that the Council’s greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) were 2,869 tonnes on a CO2 equivalent basis (tCO2e), down from 3,017 tCO2e the previous year (see Chart 1). This is a 148 tCO2e reduction on the previous year. It doesn’t look significant in the chart below due to the scale effect of the substantial reductions achieved from 2009/10 through to 2016/17, however the reductions in emissions on a year-on-year basis were 3.0% in 2017/18 and are provisionally estimated to be 4.9% in 2018/19.

9.    On a longer view, this result translates into a reduction of 77% compared to the 2009/10 baseline year, edging closer to our target of an 80% reduction in emissions by 2021/22 (see also Chart 1). That target has, of course, recently been surpassed by the Council’s decision to pursue carbon neutrality (net zero carbon emissions) by 2025.

Chart 1

The impact of the grid-emissions-factor

10.  The main contributor to this reduction in emissions was an external impact, not related to any direct actions by the Council. Every year the national electricity grid is assessed by the Ministry for the Environment to determine the emissions factor to apply to electricity generated from the national grid. In 2018/19, there was an increase in the proportion of energy generated from zero and low carbon sources compared to the previous year. This resulted in an 18.2% reduction in the ‘grid-emissions-factor’ that is applied when calculating the carbon impact of using electricity supplied by the national grid (from 0.1195 to 0.0977 kg CO2e/unit).

11.  As a stand-alone effect this would have reduced our emissions by a provisional 254 tCO2e. This contribution was partially offset by other countervailing factors to result in a provisional net reduction of 148 tCO2e, as reported in para 8 above (these factors are outlined briefly below).

The improvement in the grid-emissions factor had a large impact on our emissions result because i) it was a significant reduction in the grid factor and, ii) it applied to a large proportion of our emissions base. In 2017/18 electricity consumption accounted for 46% of our total emissions, whereas in 2018/19 this had dropped to 39% largely due to the grid factor effect.

 

LED streetlight impact

12.  The next most significant contributor was the further impact of the two-year LED streetlight conversion programme (completed in 2018/19). This saw a reduction in electricity use by our streetlight network of 32.3% for 2018/19 on the previous year. This translates into a reduction of  39 tCO2e. Taken together with the grid-emissions impact for streetlights (-59 tCO2e) this resulted in a reduction in Access and Transport emissions of 97 tCO2e (see Chart 2).

Other sources of emissions reduction

13.  The Operations division reported a a small provisional reduction in emissions of just under 8 tCO2e to 886.9 tonnes in 2018/19.  This was largely due to a reduction in diesel consumption
(-24 tCO2e), fertiliser use (-10 tCO2e) and the emissions impact of electricity consumption
(-8 tCO2e)[2], offset by a large increase in Solid Waste to Landfill (33 tCO2e).

14.  The General-Council (a catch-all operational category), reported a small provisional reduction of 7.5 tonnes of CO2e in 2018/19.

Countervailing effects

15.  The Aquatic Facilities division was a major countervailing influence. It reported a provisional increase in emissions of 91 tonnes of CO2e[3]. This was comprised of the following two factors:

i).     An increase in emissions of 119 tCO2e due to a 42% increase in the consumption of natural gas on the prior year.

ii).    A reduction in the emissions impact of electricity use of 29 tCO2e. This was due to the improvement in the grid emissions factor being sufficient to swamp the effects of a 7% increase in the consumption of electricity.

16.  Water and Wastewater reported a provisional reduction in emissions of 96 tonnes of CO2e to 972 tCO2e (it remains one of our largest emission sources). This is the result of a 121 tCO2e[4] reduction in the the emissions impact of electricity consumption, offset to a small extent by increases of 15 tCo2e, 5tCO2e and 4 tCO2e, respectively, in sludge to landfill, freight to landfill, and screenings to landfill.

Where to from here – next steps

17.  A fleet assessment is planned and work is currently being done to get that underway as soon as possible. A progress report on the results of that assessment and any consequent recommendations for new BEV, PHEV or conventional hybrid purchases should be reported back to Councillors in April/May 2020.

18.  Once that fleet assessment is underway, investigations will begin into the more promising options for emissions reduction discussed in last year’s ‘Towards Carbon Neutrality by 2025’ report to Council (27 June 2019).  We will aim to report back on at least some of those options later this financial year.

 

 

 

Chart 2

 

 

 

Risks (to programme, cost, quality, other)

Full briefing on the ‘carbon reduce’ audit results in quarter 3.

Issues (for elected member attention)

Full briefing on the ‘carbon reduce’ audit results in quarter 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place and Space 
•	Parks and open space
•	Recreation and leisure
•	Community facilities and community support
•	Economic development

 


 


Parks and open space

Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019 Ngā papa rēhia me ngā waahi māhorahora

 

Purpose

To manage a wide range of parks, reserves and open space to benefit the whole of our community. To facilitate barrier-free access to our network of cycleways, walkways and bridleways.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $2.19m (ytd)  $2.21m budget (ytd)

$4.47m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates)

 

 $0.10m (ytd)

 $ 0.61m budget (ytd)

$1.29m budget (full year)

®     Major variance, on track for year end

®     The lower income is mostly due to a decision by the Council to accept the proposal for the Ngarara Waimeha Development in Waikanae to develop and provide a pocket park as part of their development instead of paying cash for reserve.

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

  $0.12m (ytd)

      $0.24 m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $0.49m underspend

$1.43m budget (full year)

®     Major variance year to date, lower spending planned for year end. The lower spending relates to two projects –  Ōtaki  Beach Development and Paraparaumu/Raumati Escarpment planned to be completed in 2020/21  There is some reprioritisation planned within the activity to meet community commitments described below. 5 playground upgrades due to commence in quarter 3.

Projects

®     There is only one parks and open space ‘project’ this year, the Districtwide Parks and Playgrounds work programme. It is a capex over $250k project and is on target.

 

Performance measures (KPI)

®     Of the 11 KPIs two were achieved at the end of the first quarter 2019/20, two were on target and the other seven were not yet due.

Summary of projects

The parks and open space significant project is on target and summarised below.

1.     Districtwide Parks and Playgrounds

The playgrounds scheduled for upgrade this year are Campbell Park, Paekākāriki; Mazengarb Park, Paraparaumu; Marere Avenue, Paraparaumu; Waimeha Domain, Waikanae; Pharazyn Avenue, Waikanae; and Tasman Road Reserve, Ōtaki.

Contracts for the playgrounds (except for Marere Avenue) were negotiated and confirmed in the second quarter.  The installation of the new playgrounds is planned over the next few months, commencing from early February and completed by April.

Key risks/issues:

§ Marere Avenue playground is part of the upgrade programme but the park as a whole needs improvement. Officers have worked with the local community to understand their priorities for the park and a draft plan is in place for this year that includes some new equipment for the playground and improved access and footpath.  The overall plan allows for improved community use and this will be implemented in stages as budget allows.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

41

749

722

$Þ

Forecasting very slight underspend.

 

2.     Other projects

Project

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Comment

Districtwide beams and seating

5

55

55

 

On track for year end.

Paraparaumu/Raumati Escarpment

-

201

-

 

Will be carried over to 20/21 while under discussion with Kiwi rail.

Ōtaki  Beach development

-

333

-

 

Will be carried over the 20/21 while road stopping issue resolved.

 

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

Other key developments

·    The official opening event at Maclean Park was held in November with over 1,000 people attending throughout the day.  Feedback received was very positive.

·    Parks officers have been working with Councils Arts, Museums & Heritage Advisor to arrange for the “Tohorā” artwork to be installed in Maclean Park.

·    The ‘Stay and Play’ video series was released through social media channels to showcase different activities to do in our open spaces over summer.

·    The boardwalk through Waimeha Domain has been replaced.

·    Approximately 15km of the Waikanae River track on the northern bank has been renewed.

 

Waikanae ki Uta ki Ta

·    Council officers continued working with the Department of Conservation, Greater Wellington Regional Council, iwi and community representatives on the establishment of a Waikanae River Mountains to the Sea catchment restoration programme, provisionally named ‘Waikanae ki Uta ki Tai’. This programme aims to foster a collaborative, coordinated approach to protecting and restoring the Waikanae River catchment from the headwaters to the sea.

·    The early focus has been on iwi partnership and developing a governance structure and values framework. The Department of Conservation (DoC) is fulfilling its commitment to lead, assigning a staff member to work on the programme 20 hours per week, and allocating a long-term budget. Kāpiti Coast District Council and Greater Wellington Regional Council have shared the programme costs to date.

·      The governance structure has been agreed.  The next step is to appoint community members to the steering committee.  This process will start in early 2020.

Performance measures

There are 11 key performance indicators (KPI) in the parks and open space activity.

Performance measures

Target

Result

Comment

Achieved

 

Residential dwellings in urban areas are within 400 metres of a publicly owned open space

85%

Achieved

(99.4%)

103ha out of 18,452ha (0.6%) of the total District Plan residential area are not within 400m of a publicly owned open space.

At least a 10 year burial capacity is maintained across the district

Achieve

Achieved
(56 years)

There is a total of 56 years capacity across the three cemeteries (based on 2013 Census data and growth analysis).

On target

 

Sports grounds are open when scheduled

85%

On target

 

Sports grounds were open 97% of the time in the second quarter.

(2018/19 result was 97%)

All available records will be on council’s website within four weeks of interment

100%

On target

 

 

 

Not yet due

 

Residents(%) who are satisfied with the current availability of facilities

85%

Not yet due

 

The annual Park Users’ survey will be done in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the quality of Council parks and open space

85%

Not yet due

 

The annual Park Users’ survey will be done in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the quality and range of recreation and sporting facilities in the district

85%

Not yet due

 

The annual Park Users’ survey will be done in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Residents (%) that are satisfied with Council playgrounds

85%

Not yet due

 

The annual Park Users’ survey will be done in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Users who are satisfied with the cemeteries appearance and accessibility

85%

Not yet due

 

The annual Park Users’ survey will be done in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Users who are satisfied with Council walkways, cycleways and bridleways

85%

On target

(93%)

This is the provisional result from the resident opinion survey.  The final result will be available after the fourth quarter.

(2018/19 result was 94%)

Residents (%) who are satisfied with access points to beaches

85%

On target (91%)

This is the provisional result from the resident opinion survey.  The final result will be available after the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 92%)

 

 

 Recreation and leisure

· Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019 Hākinakina

 

Purpose

To provide affordable and safe aquatic facilities, services and programmes for the health and wellbeing of our community.  This activity also provides a districtwide library service.  and arts and museums services for the Kāpiti community.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $4.21m (ytd)

       $4.34m budget (ytd)

$8.48m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates) 

 

  $0.88m (ytd)

         $0.91m budget (ytd)

$1.85m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

 

  $0.39m (ytd)

       $0.49m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $0.06m underspend              

$1.24m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, lower spending forecast for the year.

®     The lower spending forecast relates to plans to move swimming pool routine asset maintenance and renewal to 2020/21 to reduce the inconvenience to the public and minimise the  loss of income.

Projects

There are no significant council projects in this activity for 2019/20.

®     There are a number of minor projects summarised in the table on the next page.

Performance measures (KPI)

®     Of the ten KPIs from the Recreation and Leisure acitivity three were on target and four were not due yet .

®     The three KPIs not on target are all in the library area and are attributable to the closure of the Waikane Library in late 2018 and its subsequent replacement by a smaller medium term option.

Summary of projects

There are a number of minor projects underway this year, they are summarised in the table below.

Minor projects

Project

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Comment

Coastlands Aquatic Centre

15

112

64

$Þ

Carryover of $50k to be requested.

Ōtaki  Theatre

10

147

148

$Ý

On track for year end.

Public Art

1

154

145

$Þ

Currently forecasting slight underspend.

Pool - Waikanae

122

204

204

 

On track for year end.

Library - Books

94

211

211

 

On track for year end.

Mahara Gallery

24

270

204

$Þ

Project slowed due to funding application being declined

Other minor projects

120

178

244

$Ý

Forecast increase relates to medium term Waikanae Library fit out and Paraparaumu Library Basement renewal.

 

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

Other key developments

Libraries

·    Planning has commenced for a review of the library’s strategic direction. The project is called Te Ara Hāpai meaning a pathway that uplifts and supports people. This conveys our commitment to a new strategic pathway, one that leads to a more responsive and inclusive library service that works with the community to create positive and empowering opportunities for all.

·    The library ran another successful reading challenge for our adult customers. This year we had just over 100 people participating who collectively submitted 387 entries to the challenge.

·    Work continues on relocating Waikanae library stock currently in storage to other libraries where possible and options are being explored for smaller local storage options that will enable easier access for library customers.

·    This quarter the library re-established our popular Introductory Te Reo Māori classes at Paraparaumu. Given the level of interest we will be expanding our offering in 2020.

Arts and Museums

·    Another successful Kāpiti Arts Trail was held over the first two weekends in November, attracting an estimated 10,000* or more visitors. In 2019 there were 108 participant galleries, hubs, and artists’ studios, and visitor feedback indicated a high level of satisfaction. Visitors from outside the district increased in number from about 20% to 40% of total visitors, indicating a successful promotions campaign targeted to areas outside of Kāpiti District.

·    In October, the Public Art Panel accepted the Detailed Designs for the Maclean Park/Te Uruhi art commission, Tohorā by Kereama Taepa. The fabrication and installation project is currently underway with final installation expected in the next quarter.

Aquatics

·    There were 83,281 pool visits in the second quarter, continuing the trend of being the highest attendance since the opening of the Coastlands Aquatic Centre. This is due to higher programme numbers including learn to swim, an updated marketing approach and seven major events which were held during this time.

·    A total of 668 people were registered for swimming lessons during the school term in the second quarter – 486 at Coastlands Aquatic Centre, 117 at the Ōtaki Pool and 65 at Waikanae Pool. 127 children completed the holiday swimming programme during the second quarter.

·    There were 469 school children who participated in schools swimming lessons delivered by council instructors in the second quarter.

·    Seven events were held during the second quarter. Coastlands Aquatic Centre hosted another sold out Soundsplash; a Masters invitation meet; GZR race meet and Raptors Swim Club Champs. Waikanae Pool held a Family Fun Day for the opening plus a Christmas Party and Ōtaki Pool hosted a Pool Party.  Over 1,000 people attended the events in total.

 

Performance measures  

There are ten key performance indicators (KPI) in the recreation and leisure activity. The three KPIs not on target  are discussed below:

i)       Total visits to libraries is below target with 138,191 visits in the two quarters to date.   To achieve the annual target of 300,000 visits we need to average around 75,000 visits per quarter.  The Waikanae Library, with 27,016 visits in the two quarters is 10,000 visits down on the corresponding 2018/18 quarters leading up to the library closure. 

ii)      2,767 new items were added to the library’s collection in the second quarter, which equates to 101 new items per 1,000 of population in the year to date. With the reduction in collections budget for 2019/20 the expected level of new items added to the collection for the year will be approximately 200 items per 1000 of population, well below the annual target of 350.

iii)     Number of items borrowed is also below target with 133,798 in the second quarter.  This is also a reflection of the impact of the Waikanae Library closure. To achieve the annual target of 650,000 items borrowed we need to average around 162,500 items borrowed per quarter.

Performance measures

Target

Result

Comment

On target

 

Visits to swimming pools in the district

At or above 290,000 annual admissions

On target

83,281 combined swims in the second quarter (compared to 76,867 last year).

(2018/19 result was 293,638)

Learn to swim registrations

At or above 3,200 annual registrations

On target

668 registrations for the second quarter (634 last year).

(2018/19 result was 3,344)

Total value of applications received relative to the total amount of funding in each allocation round

Ratio is > 1

On target

 

In the first round of the Creative Communities Scheme 2019/20 (July/Aug 2019), a total amount of $23,797 was applied for: $22,904 was available – a ratio of 1.04 to 1.

Next funding round commences Feb/March 2020

(2018/19 result was 1.58:1)

Not on target

 

Total visits to libraries

At or above 300,000 annually

Not on target

There were 72,360 visits to the district’s four libraries in the second quarter (20,120 for Ōtaki, 918 for Paekākāriki, 13,137 for Waikanae and 38,186 for Paraparaumu).

(2018/19 total visits were 253,978)

Collections are refreshed in accordance with New Zealand public library standards

Maintain 350 new items (incl renewals) per 1,000  (where population is 52,762)

Not on target

There were 2,767 items added to the library collections in the first quarter. That equates to 101 items per 1,000 for year to date. This is a reflection of the reduction in the Library Collection budget for 2019/20.

(2018/19 result was 331 per 1,000)

Not on target

 

Number of items borrowed per annum (including renewals)

650,000

Not on target 

There were 133,798 items borrowed in the second quarter for a year to date total of 280,331.

(2018/19 result was 613,190)

Not yet due

 

Council will maintain PoolSafe accreditation

Achieve

Not yet due

PoolSafe accreditation will be assessed in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was ‘Achieved’)

Users who are satisfied with the pools services and facilities

85%

Not yet due

Provisional results for this measure are not due until the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 96%)

Users who are satisfied with the library services

85%

Not yet due

Survey results are not yet available.

(2018/19 result was 95% satisfied).

Users who are satisfied with library spaces and physical environments

85%

Not yet due

The annual Library Users Survey will be undertaken in May 2020.

(2019/20 result was 90% satisfied)

 

 

 

Community facilities and support

· Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019Whakaurunga hapori me ngā hāpai hapori

·                

Purpose

To manage and maintain Council’s building and property assets and provide resources to the community for capacity building and service provision.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate this activity
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $2.16m (ytd)

       $2.36m budget (ytd)

$4.36m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc.
(Excluding Rates)

 

  $0.88m (ytd)

       $0.78m budget (ytd)

$1.57m budget (full year)

®     Moderate variance, on track for year end.

®     Interment fees are higher than expected.

 

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

 


  $0.75m (ytd)

       $0.81m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $0.63m underspend

$3.89m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, lower spending planned for the year.

®     The renewal project for the Paraparaumu Memorial Hall is on hold pending a strategic review of Community Facilities.

Projects

®     There is one significant Community Facilities and Community Support projects.

®     The Housing for Older Person’s renewals project is forecast to overspend the initial budget, largely as a result of urgent remediation needed to the Wipata Flats in Paekākāriki and as a consequence of the previous Council giving direction to renew units when they became vacant.

Performance measures (KPI)

®     Of the 15 KPIs only 14 of these have targets as one is for recording and monitoring purposes.

®     Seven KPIs were on target at the end of the first quarter 2019/20 and the results for the other seven KPIs are not yet due.

Summary of projects

 

1.     Older person’s housing renewals

Council completed full interior renewal on six Housing for Older Persons units during the second quarter.  The Older person’s housing renewals project is currently on target.

As at 31 December 2019, the Applicant Register number is 52. 

Key risks/issues:

§ Contractor/component availability may affect completion. 

§ Three units became vacant in the second quarter.

§ Renewals works are generally undertaken when they become vacant. This means there is no certainty with forecasting but on average Council expects an average tenant churn of 15 tenants per year.  This year thirteen units have either been renewed or in the process of being renewed.

§ Prioritisation for managing renewals is part of the Asset Management Improvement Plan currently being developed across the Community Facilities Portfolio. In the mean time staff will continue to assess units for renewal as and when they become vacant. This will be in addition to ad hoc replacement bathrooms, kitchens or other building elements staff believe necessary.    

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

512

587

781

 

Given spending to date we’re forecasting an overspend of this year’s budget. The projected overspend is in large part due to the $150,000 spent on the urgent remediation of the Wipata Flats.

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

 

 

2.     Other projects

Project

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Comment

EQP

61

123

122

$Þ

Detailed Seismic Assessment in process at Ōtaki  Museum, including architectural brief and Quantity Surveyor Estimate.  Reports expected in January 2020.

Halls - Paraparaumu/ Raumati

1

144

73

$Þ

Budget is for the external management costs expected to be incurred for the Te Newhanga Kāpiti Community Centre project.

Paraparaumu College Gymnasium

-

255

255

Contribution anticipated paid in last quarter.

Paraparaumu Memorial Hall renewals

16

327

16

 

The renewal project is on hold for reassessment of community needs across ward level. Work around Accessibility and Fire to be considered by SLT early in New Year, no budget allocated for this yet.  

Waterfront building

83

505

140

$Þ

A reduced scope of works was agreed with the tenants. Replacement of the roof and windows has now been completed. 

Performing Arts Centre

-

1,600

1,600

 

Contribution will be paid in January 2020.

Other minor projects

74

349

408

$Ý

The forecast overspend is the result of possible unbudgeted spends on public toilet renewals in Ōtaki and proposed work at Takiri House.

 

Other key developments

Mahara Gallery

·    The Mahara Gallery Trust submitted a funding applications to the Lotteries Environment and Heritage Fund and also to the Lottery Community Facilities Fund.  Both applications were declined due to substantial pressure on funds from other applicants and in the case of the LCF fund other applications aligning better.  We understand that there are two other Central Government funding opportunities the Trust is targetting.  The Trust is arranging a meeting of board members in the new year to consider next steps. 

 

Te Newhanga Kāpiti Community Centre

·    Moisture testing was undertaken in November 2019 at the Community Centre.  The results did not identify elevated mould readings and noted that the levels of mould found would be unlikely to result in health issues.  Alternative temporary accommodation options are currently being sought given the condition of the building.  

Waikanae Library replacement

·    Project Governance and work streams have been established.  A scope of service is now being prepared to obtain a fee proposal from Boffa Miskel with the intention to workshop Library Site Investigations alongside the Future Community Services.

Animal Management Renewal

·    A contract has been awarded to Focus Projects Ltd to undertake renewal of the Animal Management Centre in Paraparaumu.  The project is due to start at the end of January with completion estimated at four months.  The scope not only includes renewal of the existing assets but also inclusion of a vetinary area and a secure drive in kennel space. 

Asset Management Maturity Improvement Program

·    As at the end of the Second Quarter, a project team has been established to implement the Morrison Low report outcomes and new staff recruited to the Property Services team.  Condition surveys for the Housing for Older Persons Units and residential properties have been completed.  Staff are now developing plans for implementation over the next three years which may include recommendations for full or partial interior renewals, increased management of tenant behaviour to assist minimising asset deterioration, as well as undertaking identifed routine and planned maintenance requirements.  Substantial progress has been made on completing the Condition Surveys for the non-residential and Community Facilities Portfolio. 

Kāpiti Performing Arts Centre

·    Kāpiti College satisifed the funding requirements for Council to release its $1.6million plus GST contribution.  The funds are due to be paid in early January 2020. 

Community support initiatives

·    Council supported the annual International Day of the Older Person with an awards event. The event is an initiative of the Kāpiti Coast Older Persons’ Council supported by Age Concern Kāpiti and the Council.   Louella Jensen, Olive Mihailov, Beverly Chappell, Rakauoteora Te Maipi were all seniors recognised for their outstanding contribution to the Kāpiti community.

·    The Tuia programme is a Mayors TaskForce for Jobs (MTFJ) initiative that provides development and support for rangatahi leaders through a mentoring  programme with participating Mayors around New Zealand.   Mayor Gurunathan has selected a rangatahi particpant for 2020 with the programme commencing in January.

·    Council continues to support the Kāpiti Settlement Support Network, Kāpiti Health Advocacy Group, Kāpiti Accessibilty Advisory Group, Kāpiti Youth Council, Kāpiti Older Persons’ Council, Kāpiti Multi-cultural Council and the Kāpiti Social Services network to encourage community particpation and support advocacy for unmet needs. Support was extended to a seniors buisness network.

·    Council has been working with Wellington City Mission to collaborate on two new initiatives: The establishment of a community sports bank aimed at supplying repurposed sports equipment to give local children and young people the opportunity to particpate in sports. The initiative is region wide and has support from the Police, national and regional sports clubs and local organisations. The Kāpiti sports bank will be coordinated by a local community organisation and is set to start in the new year.The second project with Wellington City Mission looks to support families and individuals with housing needs. The initiative will look at a solution based approach to providing essential services through the Orange Sky bus- a mobile multi facilities service for individuals and families with complex needs.  This intiative will be piloted in locations around the Kāpiti district and is aimed at the homeless community.

·    Council continues to support the local not-for-profit sector by facilitating funding clinics in Ōtaki and Paraparaumu. The clinics give local services the opportunity to meet with the Department of Internal Affairs funding advisor and access information about lotteries funding.

·    Kāpiti Grey Power was successful in securing Government funding for the initial engagement to get Kāpiti on its way to becoming Age Friendly.  A Memorandum of Collaboration with Council has been established. Council staff attended and supported the four workshops which were held across the district, in Ōtaki , Waikanae, Raumati and Paraparaumu. Information from these local workshops will help inform the overall approach to Kāpiti becoming Age Friendly. The next phase of engagement is due to commence in the new year.

·    Neighbourhood Support (national office) and Council are working collaboratively to deliver a programme for Kāpiti.  An interim approach is underway, focusing on supporting exisiting Neighbourhood support groups, utalising a digital platform, rolling out new national branding and promoting the initiative to Kāpiti households.  The service coordinator will be located at Te Newhanga Kāpiti Community Centre on a weekly basis.

·    The Kāpiti Youth Council and Zeal Kāpiti collaborated to host a Youthoween event with 100 young people attending. The event provides an opportunity for young people to come together in a safe environment and learn about Zeal services while celebrating differences.

·    Over 60 people representing the local not-for-profit sector joined Council to celebrate the festive season. Guest speakers were Mayor Gurunathan and Ray Tuffin from Wellington City Mission. The event was a networking opportunity and gave council the opportunity to acknowledge the sector’s contribution to community wellbeing.

·    Council continues to support the Te Newhanga Kāpiti Community Centre service to the wider community. This quarter 431 bookings were held a the Centre.


 

Performance measures summary

1.         There are 15 KPIs in the Community facilities and community support activity. Only 14 of these have targets as one is for recording and monitoring purposes.

Performance measures

Target

Result
(ytd)

Comment

Community facilities

 

On target

On target

On target

On target

Occupancy rate of available1 housing for older persons units

97%

On target

(99.6%)

Four of five available units re-let in second quarter.  Three units vacated in November are being assessed for renewal or will be re-let

Percentage of council-owned buildings that have a current building warrant of fitness (where required)

100%

On target

(100%)

All Warrant of Fitness have been issued on time

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Residents (%) who are satisfied that public toilets are clean, well-maintained and safe

75%

On target
(88%)

The provisional result from the first quarterly Resident Opinion Survey was 88% (note that this is from 147 of 208 respondents).

(2018/19 result was 82%)

Urgent requests in regard to public toilet facilities that are responded to within four hours

98%

On target

(100%)

There were 32 urgent service requests received in the 2nd quarter, with all meeting the four-hour target

(2018/19 result was 97.8%)

Not yet due

 

Users (%) who are satisfied with the standard of the library building facilities

85%

Not yet due

The Library users survey is not conducted until the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 90%)

Users who are satisfied with halls

80%

Not yet due

The annual Hall Hirers Survey is conducted in the third quarter. 

(2018/19 result was 92%)

Housing for older persons tenants (%) who rate services and facilities as good value for money

85%

Not yet due

The annual tenant survey is conducted in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Housing for older persons tenants (%) who are satisfied with services and facilities

85%

Not yet due

The annual tenant survey is conducted in the third quarter.

(2018/19 result was 97.4%)

1.      Where ‘available’ units excludes those flats that are unavailable due to renewals or maintenance work being carried out.

Performance measures

Target

Result

Comment

Community support

 

 

On target

On target

On target

On target

 

Council’s social investment programme enables services to deliver on community priorities

Achieve

On target

Year One report backs have been delivered to Council. A formal report will follow in 2020.

Contract deliverables have been agreed for Year 2 and will be monitored to assess performance.

 

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the Council’s community support services

85%

On target
(87%)

The result from the second quarterly Resident Opinion Survey was 87%.

 

 

Community connectedness and diversity projects and initiatives planned for year are progressed or completed

Achieve

On target

Support provided for the Kāpiti Multi-Cultural Council events.

 

Support for Kāpiti Settlement Network meeting and ongoing bimonthly meetings aimed at services to support migrants.

 

Not yet due

 

 

Youth Development Centre opens and Youth development programme deliverables are achieve

Achieve

Not yet due

Year Four report back has been received by council with a formal report back to Strategy and Operations Committee in the new year.

 

Participants from the social and community sector are satisfied with the learning opportunities and workshops provided by Council

85%

Not yet due

Survey due in fourth quarter.

 

(2018/19 result was 85%)

The youth council, older person’s council and accessibility advisory group are satisfied or very satisfied with opportunities provided to influence the content of council strategies, policies and project planning

Satisfied

Not yet due

Survey due in fourth quarter

(2018/19 result was ‘Achieved’)

Monitor only

 

Estimated attendance at council-supported events

There is no target as we will use this for monitoring.

Monitor only

The No.8 Wire week had over 300 participants with some sessions in Te reo Māori for the first time. Over 500 people attended the Kāpiti Age on the Go expo in Waikanae.

80 people representing the not-for-profit sector attended two funders’ forums.

 

60 people attended the end of year social sector activity.

100 young people attending the Youth event hosted by the Youth Council and Zeal.

 

Economic development

· Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019Whakawhanake umanga

 

Purpose

This activity  is aimed at generating greater growth, employment and prosperity in the Kāpiti region

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $0.92m (ytd)

        $0.97m budget (ytd) $2.01m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance.

®     Additional spending to budget on Kāpiti Gateway feasibility.

 

Operating income

 What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates)

 

  $0.07m (ytd)

         $0.00m budget (ytd)

$0.03m budget (full year)

®     Moderate variance, on track for year end.

®     The additional income this quarter is from NZTA for the Peka Peka to Ōtaki  Expressway Project and Provincial growth funding.

 

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

  $3.06m (ytd)

       $1.05m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $1.28m overspend $2.56m budget (full year)

®     Major variance, additional capital spending planned for year end.

®     The additional capital spending relates to the Kāpiti Road project which will receive additional NZTA funding and strategic property purchases which are likely to be funded by proceeds from the sale of council land.

Projects

®     The Strategic Land Purchase Fund and the Town Centres project are the two main projects in this area.  Both are capex over $250,000 projects.

®     Both projects are regarded as on target from a Council perspective.

Performance measures (KPI)

®     Of the 3 KPIs one was on target as at the end of the first quarter 2019/20 and the results of the other two KPIs are not yet due .

Summary of projects

There are two economic development projects reported in this activity report (the Strategic Land Purchase Fund and the Town Centres project).  We have reported on the Elevate Ōtaki project developments on the next page. This is not included as a Council project in the chart on the previous page as Council is providing resource and funding support for the project but is not managing it.

1.     Town Centres project

®     W3 Mahara Place upgrade project construction is now complete.

®     Kāpiti Road shared path and road widening between Arawhata Road and Brett Ambler Way major construction works are complete. 

®     Continued coordinated SH1 Revocation works aligned with Town Centres master plan priority projects with a focus on Paraparaumu and Waikanae.

Key risks/issues:

§ SH1 Revocation works do not align with Town Centres projects leading to re-prioritisation and re-scheduling.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

1,460

1,135

1,978

$Ý

This budget is largely for the planned Kāpiti road project with additional scope of works to undertake the road widening. The resultant additional costs are to be funded by the NZTA ‘Low Cost Low Risk’ budget. Works due to be completed by January 2020.

 

2.     Strategic Land Purchase Fund

®     26 – 29 Marine Parade, Paraparaumu Beach was acquired by Council during this quarter.

(there is no timeline set for this fund as it is dependent on when strategic parcels of land come up for sale).

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

1,604

1,428

1,863

$Ý

Mainly Marine Parade acquisitions and other strategic land/property acquisitions as outlined in the paper to Council on 26 September 2019.

 

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý


 

3.     Elevate Ōtaki

®     James Cootes has been confirmed as the Chair of Elevate Ōtaki .

®     Ōtaki identity work by Flightdec is complete and the official outcomes will be released as part of the Identity Rollout Programme.

®     Talk Creative have been appointed as the lead consultant for the Identity Rollout Programme.  This programme will be in progress for the first six months of 2020

®     Elevate Ōtaki  are providing a business promotion social media opportunity that is available to all Ōtaki  businesses that will run from prior to Christmas through to after Maorilands Film Festival. 

®     Business Preparedness Survey of SH1 Ōtaki  businesses is complete with the final report delivered on time by Kāpiti Business Projects. Elevate Ōtaki  has completed an initial assessment of the recommendations from the report and whilst having undertaken some immediate action (networking event), are assessing the other recommendations..

®     Elevate Ōtaki  hosted a networking event in Ōtaki  on 10 December.  The primary purpose of the event was to feedback the highlevel information from the Business Preparedness Survey.  In addition, Bayleys presented on business happenings in Ōtaki  and the Elevate Ōtaki  Social Media campaign was introduced.  The Talk Creative team was introduced.  The event was well attended. 

®     A progress meeting was held on 19 December between representatives of Elevate Ōtaki  and Economic Development.  Topics included the Economic Development Strategy.

®     Elevate Ōtaki  attended the Community Expo held by Ōtaki  Promotions Group (OPG).

Key risks/issues:

§ Ōtaki  Identity iwi engagement – following an initial meeting with Ngā Hapū early in the project, a further meeting has not been secured.  There is a risk Ngā Hapū may not support the project however the risk is reduced as the identity aligns with Ngā Hapū’s “Maanakitaanga”, therefore the risk is considered low.  Engagement between the two groups continue.

§ Ōtaki Identity project perception by the community. High potential for varied views on the topic by old and new residents and various sectors or groups. Works do not align with Town Centres projects leading to re-prioritisation and re-scheduling. (carried forward).

§ Administration and ED Support – there is a discrepancy in the expectations of the Council governance of the group and Elevate Ōtaki. From previous discussions with Council, Elevate Ōtaki believe the support was committed to until the end of the term of the funding support i.e. 2021/22.  Whereas the Council governance of the group have committed only to 30 June 2020.  This is an outstanding point within the Terms of Reference.  The current support structure is confirmed until the 30 June 2020. (carried forward)

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

41

63

63

 

Activities planned for the current year are expected to utilise some of the unused budget from previous years.

 


 

Other key developments

Economic Development Strategy Refresh

·    The Economic Development team continues to progress the refresh of the Economic Development Strategy with meetings with the Drafting Group occurring on a monthly basis, in addition stakeholder workshops are held regularly with the wider business community. Progress continues as follows with next steps outlined below:

·    Council briefing (January 2020)

·    Incorporate feedback into development of strategy document (Dec – Jan 2020)

·    Circulate draft strategy and implementation plan for final feedback (Feb 2020)

·    Finalise strategy (Mar 2020)

·    Adopt and implement strategy (Mar 2020)

Filming requests

·    Council has been advised that a feature file will be filmed on the Kāpiti Coast during Feb / Mar 2020. The film, “Poppy” is written by local resident, Linda Nicoll and tells the story of a young girl with down syndrome who wants to be a mechanic. The film has received funding from the NZ Film Commission, as part of their 125 years of Women’s Suffrage fund.

·    Council is supporting the film with finding office space and accommodation as well as facilitating filming permits and locations.

·    Discussions are to take place with the production company about hosting the film premier in Kāpiti in late 2020. This will be dependent on distribution rights for the film.  

Major Events Fund

·    In October 2019, Council received advice that the organiser of Flair had made the decision to postpone the event for 12 months until Feb / Mar 2021. As a result, the approved funding of $50,000 was not drawn down.

·    A paper was presented to Council in December 2019 recommending the reallocation of the funds and the allocation of the feasibility funding. Council approved the following funding allocation:

Event

Amount

Type

Toot Suite Boutique Festival

$20,000

Major Event

2020 Takutai Kāpiti

$19,000

Major Event

Coasters Musical Theatre

$0

Ineligible

Te Tapoi Kāpiti

$11,000

Major Event

Dirt Farm – Mountain Biking Event

$15,000

Feasibility

 

·    The funding process for the 2020/21 Major Event Fund will commence in March 2020.

·    The Kāpiti Food Fair was held on 30 November 2019. Organisers were very pleased with the turnout which is expected to have increased on previous years. A survey is underway with results expected shortly.

Kāpiti Destination Story update

·    The redevelopment of the Kāpiticoastnz.com website continues to make good progress, with the refreshed website now live. There will be additional development of the site which will include improved functionality, more stories and additional sections for Business, Meetings and Residents.   A sample of the new site is shown below:

 

·    The following information is held on visits to the website for the 3-month period and how users accessed the website:

Website Visitors - 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019

Total Users                                                                      5,369

New users                                                                       5,290

Page views                                                                    12,770

 


 

·    Audience Acquisition - 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019

Organic Search (Search for keyword)

3,302

Direct (Typed url)

1,473

Referral (link from other website)

353

Social media (Facebook / Instagram)

289

§ 

·    In addition to the website, Facebook and Instagram pages have been established under Kāpiti Coast NZ, which will be supporting the distribution of stories and information about the district. Sample pages are shown below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kāpiti Youth Employment Foundation (Work Ready Kāpiti)

·    The Foundation continues to work with the three local colleges - Kāpiti, Paraparaumu and Ōtaki, who run the Kāpiti Work Ready Passport Programme with their students and also host an #EmployerMeet event each, along with helping to advertise for the WEX work experience placements.

·    The Foundation is now working in partnership with Te Kura to promote each other’s offerings to suitable students.

·    Funding for the foundation has been extended for a further 12-month period commencing 1 April 2020.

Performance measures

There are three key performance indicators (KPI) in the economic activity.

Performance measures

Target

Result

Comment

On target

 

The economic development strategy implementation plan deliverables are achieved

Achieve

On target

In addition to the continued delivery of actions from the 2015 Economic Development Strategy work is well advanced on the refresh of the strategy.

The refresh of the strategy is scheduled for presentation to Council in March 2020 and is on track for delivery.

Not yet due

 

Representatives of the business leadership forum that are satisfied that the economic development strategy implementation plan deliverables are being achieved

85%

Not yet due

The business leadership forum was dissolved in the previous triennium. Work on the governance structure for the new ED strategy is being undertaken alongside the drafting of the refreshed strategy. An external  drafting group is assisting with this process, along with an external stakeholder group.

The Māori Economic Development Strategy implementation plan deliverables are achieved

Achieve

Not yet due

The Economic Development team are working with TWoK and Iwi representatives on the Economic Development Strategy Refresh and the Maori Economic Development and Well-being Plan.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Infrastructure
•	Access and transport
•	Coastal management
•	Solid waste
•	Stormwater 
•	Wastewater 
•	Water management

 


 


Access and Transport

·  Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019Putanga me to ikiiki

 

Purpose

To maintain, protect and improve our roading network and strongly encourage and support sustainable transport options.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 


  $6.38m (ytd)

       $6.42m budget (ytd)

$13.37m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates)

  $2.51m (ytd)

       $2.22m budget (ytd)

    $5.25m budget (full year)

®     Moderate variance, additional income forecast for year end.

®     The Council has received approved NZTA funding for the Ratanui roundabout and Kāpiti Road ahead of plan.

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

  $2.85m (ytd)

       $2.51m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $0.42m underspend

$8.00m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

®     Major variance ytd is due to Tasman & Mazengarb shared path and the road resealing program  being delivered ahead of plan.  Full year underspend is due to funds being spent on Kāpiti road in the Economic development activity (Town centres)

Projects

®     There are four significant projects in this activity. Three are on target.

®     The SH1 Revocation project is behind time and forecast to underspend its budget.

Performance measures (KPI)

®     One of ten KPIs was not on target - ’Residents who are satisfied with street lighting’ reported a provisional result from the first two quarters Resident Opinion Survey of 83.5% satisfied against a target of 85% (the result for 2018/19 year was 85%). 

Summary of projects

The four significant Access and Transport projects are summarised below.

1.     Sealed road resurfacing

Resurfacing of chipseal and asphalt sites has commenced, with completion by the end of April 2020.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

229

1,271

1,271

 

Work programmed to be complete by April 2020.

 

2.     Footpath renewals and upgrades

Footpath work (renewals and new footpaths) has commenced. A total of 3 km of renewals and new paths are programmed. This is an area of 6,286 m2 (note that with the first year of increased budget in 2018/19 we completed 6,586 m2, after 3,147 m2 in the previous year).

Work is progressing well and is on track for completion by 30 June 2020.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

579

930

1070

$Ý

Forecast overspend is due to additional funding from NZTA.  There will be no overspend of the Council share of the budget.

 

3.     SH1 revocation

The M2PP SH1 Revocation project is awarded to Higgins and programmed to start in Q3-early 2020.

Council and the revocation team from NZTA are reviewing NZTA’s asset data and working through the agreement on the future take-over of these assets, including Council’s requirements for these assets.

PP2O revocation process is contiuning with working on management plan and scheme design and further consultantion through out 2020.

Key risks/issues:

Poor condition of the existing culverts along M2PP revocation corridor. Meeting is arranged to discuss the resolution in early 2020.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

375

1,848

1,308

$Þ

Project is late starting.

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

4.     Minor Improvements programme

®     The Mazengarb Road/Ratanui Road roundabout completed in October 2019.

®     Safety audit and road marking upgrade Rangiuru Rd/Marine Pde completed December 2019.

®     Designs prepared for future minor safety upgrade works – Tasman Rd, Kāpiti Rd, Arawhata Rd.

®     Work programmed for Ōtaki  RSA car park.

®     Raumati Town Centre safety design report in progress, additional traffic study required in Q3.

®     Preparing preliminary work for potential 21-24 NZTA funded Safety Improvement Programme: Gray Ave, Donovan Rd, Te Moana Rd, Renown Rd.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

950

1,492

1,599

$Ý

Additional NZTA funding has been allocated and will be reinvested into these minor improvement projects.

 

Other projects

Project

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Comment

Cycleways Walkways and Bridleways

18

160

169

$Ý

Kotuku bridge and Waimea boardwalk to be delivered in Q3/Q4.

Annual Reseal – including carparks

46

187

187

 

Programme scheduled to be delivered by April 2020.

Street Lighting

59

240

240

 

On track for year end.

Drainage renewals – including curb and channel replacements

122

297

297

 

Major curb and channel replacements forecast for Jan-March 2020. Aligned with the footpath programme.

Bridge repairs

16

327

377

$Ý

Programme scheduled to be delivered by June 2020.

Traffic services renewals

94

423

423

 

Programmed to be delivered by June 2020.

Targeted roading projects – including East-West connectors

14

650

216

$Þ

Forecast for Updating Programme Business case of East-West Connectors only.

 

Other key developments

Network Planning

·    In addition to providing advice on resource consents received in the previous quarter 24 new resource consents were received this quarter. Advice has been provided at a number of pre-application, business start-up meetings and in response to temporary events.

·    Activity Management Plan (AMP) progress is on track. A draft AMP will be completed in Q4.

·    Sealed Road Condition surveying, SCRIM and HSD survery is programmed and committed for Q3 and Q4.


 

Expressways

·    Physical works continue on PP2O and Fletcher Construction is liaising with Council and residents to enable the works.

Travel planning and safety initiatives

·    There have been a range of safety initiatives this quarter, including:

·    Our first Mobility Scooter Safety Course.

·    The annual Orange Day School Patrols Parade was held with 276 School Patrollers taking part in the Parade with the Road Safety banner competition entries, presentations and speeches. Waitohu School won the School Patrol of the year. The School Patrol Road Safety banner competition was won by Raumati South School.

 

Performance measures

·    There are ten key performance indicators (KPI) in the Access and Transport activity.

·    One KPI was not on target - ’Residents (%) who are satisfied with street lighting’ reported a provisional result from the second quarter Resident Opinion Survey of 84% satisfied (83.5% cumulative over first two quarters) against a full year target of 85% (the result for 2018/19 year was 85%).  This result has improved slightly from the first quarter but satisfaction will need to improve further in the next two quarters if the KPI is to be achieved. The results for the past two years can be seen below and show considerable volatility in the quarterly results.

 

2.             Satisfaction with Street lighting – trend over the past two years

3.               

4.              Sep ‘17

5.              Dec ‘17

6.              Mar ‘18

7.              Jun ‘18

8.              Sep ‘18

9.              Dec ‘18

10.           Mar ‘19

11.           Jun ‘19

12.           Sep ‘19

13.           Dec 19

14.           Quarterly result

15.           83%

16.           91%

17.           86%

18.           83%

19.           77%

20.           86%

21.           91%

22.           87%

23.           83%

24.           84%

25.           Annual result

26.           -

27.           -

28.           -

29.           86%

30.           -

31.           -

32.           -

33.           85%

34.            

35.            

 

Performance measures

Target

Result

Comment

On target

 

Residents (%) who agree that the existing transport system allows easy movement around the district

80%

On target (80.5%)

The provisional result from the Resident Opinion Survey (ROS) over the first two quarters was a score of 80.5%.

(2018/19 result was 74%)

Number of serious and fatal crashes on district roads is falling

(DIA mandatory measure)

5-year rolling average reduces each year (it was 10.2 crashes for the 2015-19 FY period)

On target

There was 4 serious injury or fatal crash in the second quarter.

 

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the condition of roads

70%

On target (75%)

The provisional result from the second quarter ROS was 75%

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the condition of footpaths

65%

On target (65%)

The provisional result from the second quarter ROS was a score of 65%.

Not on target

 

Residents (%) who are satisfied with street lighting

85%

Not on target
(83.5%)

The provisional result for the first two quarters ROS was a score of 83.5%. (2018/19 result was 85%)

Not due yet

 

Percentage of the sealed local road network that is resurfaced

(DIA mandatory measure)

5% (expressed as kilometres)

 

Not yet due

This is reported on at the end of the year

Roads that meet smooth roads standards.

(DIA mandatory measure)

Overall Smooth Travel Exposure  is above 85%

Not yet due

This is reported on at the end of the year

(2018/19 result was 87%)

Percentage of footpaths that fall within the service standard for the condition of footpaths as set out in the activity management plan.

(DIA mandatory measure)

50% for 2019/20
(increases to 60% for 2020/21)

Not yet due

This is reported on at the end of the year.

(2018/19 result was that, of the 20% of the network surveyed, 94% was in good or better condition.)

Average cost of local roading per kilometre is comparable with similar councils in New Zealand

Achieve

Not yet due

This is reported on at the end of the year.

(2018/19 result was ‘Achieved’)

Percentage of service requests relating to roads and footpaths responded to within 3-5 hrs (urgent), 15 days (non-urgent.

(DIA mandatory measure)

Roads 85%
Footpaths 85%

Not yet due

This is reported on at the end of the year.

 

(2018/19 result was ‘Not achieved’)    

 

 

 


 

Coastal management

·              Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019Whakahaere takutai

 

Purpose

To assist in achieving the sustainable management of the coastal environment and to protect publicly-owned assets.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $0.54m (ytd)

       $0.58m budget (ytd)

$1.17m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

 

  $0.26m (ytd)

       $0.37m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $0.06m overspend

$0.67m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Projects

The coastal renewals project is on target.

Performance measures (KPI)

 

®     Both KPIs were on target at the end of the second quarter 2019/20. 

Summary of projects

Significant coastal management projects this year are summarised below.

1.     Coastal renewals

®       Coastal assets renewals and replacements at Raumati Beach launching ramp, Willow Grove, and Rosetta Road – Materials purchased in 2018/19 financial year. Physical works to commence on site in early January 2020 and completed by June 2020.

®       Replacement of the retaining wall situated on the left bank at the mouth of Wharemauku Stream – Designs completed and the plan is to lodge the Resource Consent in March 2020.

®       The Wharemauku blockwall Long Term Solution  – Option report completed and the plan is to present the options to affected residents in February- March 2020.

®       Raumati Seawall – Gathering information on  Council responsibilities/liabilities related to the Raumati Seawall is in progress.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

48

494

494

 

Remaining budget will be fully spent to complete the projects listed above. 

 

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

 

Other key developments

·    Paekākāriki seawall Building Consent application granted . (Note: The Paekākāriki seawall upgrade project had detailed designs completed on schedule in 2018/19 but the build is not due to start until 2021/22.)

·    Resolving the Old Coach Route ownership issue is in progress.

·    Work is underway to identify the critical assets needing renewal/ replacement based on the condition assessments undertaken in 2016/17.

Performance measures

There are two key performance indicators (KPIs) in the coastal management activity.

Performance measures

Target

Result
(ytd)

Comment

On target

 

Respond within 48 hours to urgent requests to repair seawalls or rock revetments

90%

On target (100%)

 

There were 13 requests to-date. (9 in Q1 and 4 in Q2). One of these was urgent and was responded to within 24 hours.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Stormwater beach outlets are kept clear

80%

On target (100%)

All beach outlets cleaned and kept clear.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

 

 

 

 

 


Solid waste

·              Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019

Para ūtonga

 

Purpose

To provide accessible, effective and efficient waste management options, encourage waste minimisation, and provide landfill management.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $0.50m (ytd)

       $0.55m budget (ytd)

$1.21m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates)

 

  $0.28m (ytd)

      $ 0.29m budget (ytd)

$0.58m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

 


  $0.02m (ytd)

       $0.08m budget (ytd)

      FY forecast $0.00 variance

$0.18m budget (full year)

 

®     On budget , on track for year end.

®     Moderate variance, materials purchased if and when available.

 

Projects

 

  

®     The Otaihanga Landfill Capping project is a multi-year capex over $250,000 project (although it is coming to the end of its life and will be under $250,000 capex in the current year spend). It is on target.

Performance measures (KPI)

®     One of five KPI is not on target. The KPI regarding resident satisfaction with the waste minimisation education, information and advice available reported a satisfaction result of 63%, against a target of 75% for the year. Council is currently recruiting for additional waste minimisation resources to improve our services in this area.

Summary of projects

There is one solid waste significant project, the Otaihanga Landfill Capping project.

1.    Landfill Capping

There remains 1.25 Ha of landfill to be formally capped as part of the landfill closure project.  Capping is progressing as appropriate fill material becomes available.

14,000 m3 of capping material were accepted at the landfill site during the quarter and stockpiled for capping works.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

22

168

168

 

Full expenditure anticipated this financial year for further cap installation, re-contouring and stormwater control works.

 

2.    Other projects

Project

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Comment

Minor projects

.6

13

13

 

Planned to use for upgrading recycling drop off stations in Q3 and renewals work in Ōtaki  and Otaihanga.

 

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

Other key developments

·    The Waste Minimisation Taskforce presented their final report to Council on 12 December 2019. The Taskforce recommended four main action towards towards Council’s 30% reduction target as listed in the 2017 WMMP. Officers will report to Council on the recommended actions in March.

·    A Council submission was made to the Ministry for the Environment on the proposed priority products and priority product stewardship scheme guidelines.

·    The Ministry for the Environment released the proposal “Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy’ for public consultation on 27 November 2019. Council will be making a submission.

·    Waste minimisation activities included:

·    Recommendations for 2019/20 Waste Levy Grants were presented to Council on 12 December, resulting in $20,909.14 of waste levy funding being allocated to 14 community projects. Five of the ten applicants for New Technology and Seed Funding grants were invited to submit full applications.

·    Work on a guide for minimsing waste at events with the regional group of Waste Minimsation Officers was completed. Two workshops for event organisiers introducing the guide as well as the earlier completed event packaging guidelines were held in November.

·    We hosted the Wellington Region Waste Forum.

·    Progressing the Maclean Park recycling bin project – bins are to be installed in January.

·    Delivering Waste Free parenting workshop, visits to recycling stations to inform customers on waste diversion options (e.g. recycling, home composting) and assisting foodbanks with plastic free food donation drives.

Performance measures

There are five key performance indicators (KPIs) in the solid waste activity.

Performance measures

Target

Result
(ytd)

Comment

On target

 

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the standard of kerbside collections

85%

On target (91%)

The average result for the first and second quarter Resident Opinion Survey was 91% satisfied.

 

Number of days disposal facilities are open

357 days per year

On target

Facilities met opening targets for the first quarter.

Licensed collectors are compliant with licence requirements

Achieve

On target

No official warnings issued.

Illegally dumped waste is removed within two working days

85%

On target

(90%)

There were 87 service requests, of which 78 were resolved within two days.

Not on target

 

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the waste minimisation education, information and advice available

75%

Not on target (65%)

The average result for the first and second quarter Resident Opinion Survey was 65% satisfied.

 

 

 


 

Stormwater

·     Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019Whakahaere wai araha

 

Purpose

To provide a stormwater system to manage surface-water run-off from urban catchments while protecting the receiving environment, ensuring water quality and reducing risks to human life and health from flooding.

Financial key:

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $1.70m (ytd)

       $1.84m budget (ytd)

$3.83m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates)

 

  $0.19m (ytd)

      $ 0.09m budget (ytd)

$0.17m budget (full year)

®     Moderate variance, additional income forecast for year end.

®     M2PP have agreed to pay Council $100,000 in lieu of undertaking lining works on several stormwater pipes they installed as part of the overall project.

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

 

  $2.34m (ytd)

       $1.48m budget (ytd)

      FY forecast $0.0m variance

$3.66m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

®     Projects brought forward such as William street & Margret road upgrades and on track for year end.

 

 

Projects

®     Both projects (Major and Minor stormwater programmes) are broadly on target despite some consenting delays with individual projects within those programmes. This has been addressed by bringing forward other works that don’t require consents.

Performance measures (KPI)

  

®     All seven KPIs were on target at the end of the second quarter 2019/20.

 

Summary of projects

Stormwater projects have been organised into major and minor stormwater programmes, with each group treated for reporting purposes as a single project. Both programmes are capital expenditure $250,000 and above and are summarised below.

1.     Major stormwater projects

The major stormwater projects cover the design and construction of major drainage systems to accommodate run off from less frequent storms (1 in 50 year or 1 in 100 year events). These projects include upgrading under capacity networks, stream works, pumping systems etc. and the main purpose of major stormwater projects is to eliminate the risk of loss of life and property damage due to flooding. The projects covered under this in 2019/20 are mainly focused on alleviating habitable floor flooding and include: stormwater upgrades for Kena Kena, Moa Road, Karaka Grove, Alexander Bridge, Titoki, Riwai, Amohia Stage 1, Kākāriki, Raumati Road Area 1, Sunshine Avenue, Amohia diversion, Charnwood Grove, Richmond Avenue, Ōtaki  Beach Stage 2, William Street and Asset renewals in areas not affected by under capacity pipes in Paraparaumu Catchments 8 and 1.

Designs and Consents Completed in 2019/20

·      Kena Kena Asset Renewals 

·      Moa Road flood Wall

·      Raumati Road Area 1

·      Asset Renewals in Paraparaumu Catchment 8

·     

Designs and Consents In Progress in 2019/20

·      Kena Kena Asset Upgrades

·      Karaka Grove Flood Wall

·      Alexander Bridge upgrade

·      Kakariki stream works

·      Riwai Stormwater Upgrades

·      Sunshine Avenue

·      Titoki Street

·      Amohia Catchment diversion

·      Charnwood Grove

·      Richmond Avenue

·      Ōtaki  Beach Stage 2

·      Asset Renewals in Paraparaumu Catchment 1

 

Physical works completed  in 2019/20

Kena Kena Asset Renewals 

Physical works in progress in 2019/20

Raumati Road Area 1 (Procurement phase)

Wiliam Street SW Upgrades (Construction 95% completed)

Moa Road flood wall (Procurement phase)

Asset Renewals in Paraparaumu Catchment 8 (Procurement phase)

 

Physical works planned for 2020/21

Kena Kena Asset Upgrades

Moa Road flood Wall

Kena Kena Asset Upgrades

Kakariki stream works

Riwai Stormwater Upgrades

 Sunshine Avenue Stormwater Upgrades

Titoki Street Stormwater Upgrades

Amohia Street Stage 1 Stream works

Amohia Catchment diversion Phase 1

Ōtaki  Beach Stage 2

Asset Renewals in Paraparaumu Catchment 1

Asset Renewals in Paraparaumu Catchment 1

Physical works Planned for 2021/22

Karaka Grove flood Wall

Alexander Bridge upgrade

Charnwood Grove

Richmond Avenue

 

Key risks/issues: difficulties in gaining GWRC consents and iwi inputs may cause delays to most of the stormwater major projects. 

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

1,984

3,133

3,133

 

There are delays/difficulties with projects associated with resource consents. Advancing projects with no consents required to the physical works phase to deliver the programme.

Project status key		
Complete			On target 			Not on target			On hold			High risk	
				
Ahead            	º▲		Lagging	º▼		Underspend	$Þ		Overspend	$Ý

 

 

2.     Minor stormwater projects

The minor stormwater project includes the design and construction of minor drainage systems to accommodate run off from more frequent storms (1 in 5 year or 1 in 10 year events). These projects include renewal of existing assets, construction of overland flow paths, minor stormwater upgrades and extensions including upgrading inlet control devices such as stormwater sumps (cost of each project is in the order of $10,000 to $100,000).

®     Completed the final two locations of 2018/19, 14 location minor improvement Contract.

®     Completed physical works at Margaret Road Stage 2 Stormwater Upgrades.

®     2019/20 minor improvements work contract awarded. Out of 7 locations covered under this contract , work completed in 2 locations. Work associated with other 5 locations will be commenced in January 2020.

®     Awanui Drive, Kauri Crescent and Matene Place – Procurement of physical works to commence in February 2020, once the designs are finalised.

®     Margaret Road Stage 1 – Designs completed. Construction on site to commence once the land owner approvals are completed.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Budget
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

329

523

523

 

Progressing well.

 

Other key developments

·    To-date in 2019/20, there were 213 complaints , compared to 180 in the same period last year.

·    Districtwide Water Quality monitoring tender ( for a period of 4 years) was awarded in December 2019. Work will commence in January 2020. 

·    “Districtwide Flood Hazard model update” tender is compiled and the plan is to advertise the tender in January 2020.

·    To date: completed cleaning (including hand cleaning and gravel extraction) 6.2 km of open drains. 

·    In 2019/20 , completed stormwater asset condition Investigations in 3 Paraparaumu Catchments (3 catchments completed in 2018/19) making the total Catchments completed 6 out of 34 catchments in the districts. Currently, asset condition asesments are in progress in 11 other catchments in Paraparaumu. 


 

Performance measures

There are seven key performance indicators in the stormwater management activity.   

Performance measures

Target

Result

Comment

On target

 

Median response time to attend a flooding event from notification to attendance on site

 

(DIA mandatory measure)

Urgent = less than or equal to 24 hours

On target

(median response time was less than 24 hours)

Year to-date, there were 280 service requests 213 were flooding related complaints.

Of those 213, 53 were urgent and the median response time was 0 days (less than 24 hours).

(2018/19 result was less than 24 hrs)

Non-urgent = less than or equal to 5 days

On target

(median response time was 3 days)

The median response time was 3 days for the 227 non-urgent flooding related complaints.

(2018/19 result was 3 days)

Percentage of all buildings that have been inundated due to minor flooding are visited within four weeks

90%

On target (100%)

Year to-date, there was 1 building (garages) related minor flooding requests. Visited within less than 1 day.

(2018/19 result was 100%)

Number of complaints received about the performance of the district's stormwater system

(DIA mandatory measure)

Less than 30 per 1000 properties connected to the council’s stormwater system

On target
(8.2 per 1000)

On a pro-rata basis: the year-to date target is 15 per 1000. 

The 213 flooding related complaints in the year to date translate to 9.5 per 1,000 connections (estimate of 22,390 connections – from 2018/19).

(2018/19 result was 8.2 per 1,000)

Number of buildings (habitable floors) reported to be flooded as a result of a less than 1-in-50 year rain event

(DIA mandatory measure)

Less than 3 per 1000 properties connected to the council’s stormwater system

On target

 

No habitable floors were affected by flooding events.

(2018/19 result was ‘Achieved’)

Measure compliance with council’s resource consents for discharge from its stormwater system, by the number of:

a) abatement notices;

b) infringement notices;

c) enforcement orders; and

d) successful prosecutions, received by the council in relation those resource consents.

(DIA mandatory measure)

None

On target

(None)

There has been no non-compliance with Council’s resource consents for discharge from its stormwater system in the first quarter.

Major flood protection and control works are maintained, repaired and renewed to the key standards as defined in the council’s activity management plan

(DIA mandatory measure)

Achieve

Achieve

Stormwater projects completed to date in this year are:

-       Kena Kena asset renewals

-       Margaret Road SW Upgrade Stage 2  

(2018/19 result was ‘Achieved’)

 Wastewater management

·               Whakahaere wai para 

Second quarter activity report – 1 October to 31 December 2019

Purpose

To provide wastewater (sewerage) infrastructure that protects public health and the natural environment and provides continuity of service for the Kāpiti community.

 

Financial key: 

 

Operating expenditure

The costs to operate council’s activities
(Excluding Overhead Allocation)

 

  $3.96m (ytd)

       $3.92m budget (ytd)

$7.97m budget (full year)

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

 

Operating income

What we earn – fees, charges, grants etc
(Excluding Rates)

 

  $0.02m (ytd)

      $ 0.15m budget (ytd)

$0.30m budget (full year)

 

®     Minor variance, on track for year end.

®     The lower income this quarter is due to lower development contributions.

Capital expenditure

Costs for our capital projects

 

  $0.42m (ytd)

       $0.68m budget (ytd)

FY forecast $0.00 underspend

$1.70m budget (full year)

 

®     Moderate variance, on track for year end.

 

Projects

®     There are three significant projects.

The Paraparaumu WWTP renewals: Additional works required above originally planned works following the clarifier failure.

 

Ōtaki WWTP upgrade projects is forecasting an overspend. 

Performance measures (KPI)

 

 

 

 

 

 

®     All five KPIs were on target at the end of at the end of the first quarter 2019/20.

 

Summary of projects

There are three significant wastewater management projects, all of which are capex projects of $250,000 and above, these are summarised in the first three tables below.  There are a further three under $250,000 capex summarised briefly in table 4 below.

1.     Paraparaumu wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) renewals

Drone and remote scanning technology was used to develop detailed 3D drawings for Clarifier 1 during recent an unplanned outage while the Ops team made some temporary repairs. The consultant will develop a design and procurement plan for the required mechanical upgrades in quarter 3.

The procurement of sludge centrifuge renewal long-lead components has been actioned following the earlier detailed condition assessment. Delivery of equipment for this stage is expcted later in quarter 3.

Design and procurement of renewal of the Return Activated Sludge Pumping Station #2 (RAS PS2) is underway to replace this aging equipment and improve the future maintainability of this pumping station. Significant challenges with flow isolation (for construction and future maintenance) are also being resolved during this work.

The critical renewal works programmed for this year is currently forecast to exceed the allocated budget. Options to defer, or offset, this expenditure are being investigated; initial approaches include spreading the cost of the RAS PS2 design and renewal work and the Clarifier 1 renewal works across FY19/20 and FY20/21.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Estimate
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

158

284

584

$Ý

Forecast over budget due to urgent renewal work for the No1 clarifier.

 

2.     Paraparaumu WWTP – resource consent renewals

The project is now on a critical path to develop an application and the next phase of development of the full list of future treatment options, fatal flaw considerations and the resulting long list is being worked through. Initial indications from a review of plant performance and of the new national baselines for discharges to surface water also question the suitability of the current stream discharge point.

Meaningful engagement with mana whenua in the re-consenting process is still sought. All our iwi have been invited to participate and to identify how this could be best achieved. The draft project governance arrangements, vision and objectives, and engagement and communications strategy have been provided and continuing progress updates will be given as the work develops.

The consent appllication sampling programme is progressing to plan. Improvements identified in the first year of sampling are being made to this programme including the use of a new influent composite sampler and automating downstream environmental sampling points.

Key risks/issues

Delays in consulation may create significant additional work for the project. The extent of consultation delay and likelihood of unsuitability of current discharge facilities indicates that Council will also apply for an extension to the existing consent, to allow for the development of options under the main application.

Costs ytd
( $000)

Estimate
($000)

Forecast
($000)

Status

Financial Commentary

133

695

462

$Þ

Currently forecasting an underspend.

3.     Ōtaki WWTP upgrades

The approved discharge consent reapplication of 2016/17 directed improvements to the land treatment discharge area (LTDA) at the Ōtaki WWTP. The design is complete for upgrades, and procurement planned for Quarter 3. The planting for grounds maintenance is planned to be undertaken in the winter 2020 planting season, and thus costs wil spread across FY2019/20 and FY2020/21 budgets.

A site-wide condition and capacity study nearing completion which will provide asset condition information and cost/ programming detail to inform the development of the 2021 LTP. A specialised pond depth/sludge study is being carried out in Quarter 3, using new remote scanning technology.

Costs ytd
( $000)

estimate
($000)