AGENDA

 

 

Council Meeting

I hereby give notice that a Meeting of the Kapiti Coast District Council will be held on:

Date:

Thursday, 30 July 2020

Time:

9.30am

Location:

Council Chamber

Ground Floor, 175 Rimu Road

Paraparaumu

Wayne Maxwell

Chief Executive

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

Kapiti Coast District Council

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Kapiti Coast District Council will be held in the Council Chamber, Ground Floor, 175 Rimu Road, Paraparaumu, on Thursday 30 July 2020, 9.30am.

Council Members

Mayor K Gurunathan

Chair

Deputy Mayor Janet Holborow

Deputy

Cr Angela Buswell

Member

Cr James Cootes

Member

Cr Jackie Elliott

Member

Cr Gwynn Compton

Member

Cr Jocelyn Prvanov

Member

Cr Martin Halliday

Member

Cr Sophie Handford

Member

Cr Robert McCann

Member

Cr Bernie Randall

Member

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

Order Of Business

1          Welcome. 5

2          Council Blessing. 5

3          Apologies. 5

4          Declarations of Interest Relating to Items on the Agenda. 5

5          Public Speaking Time for Items Relating to the Agenda. 5

6          Members’ Business. 5

7          Mayor's Report 5

Nil

8          Reports. 6

8.1            Appointment of Chair of District Licensing Committee (DLC) 6

8.2            Draft Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 - approval for public consultation. 58

8.3            Report on the Independent Organisational Review.. 111

8.4            Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23. 117

9          Confirmation of Minutes. 252

9.1            Confirmation of minutes. 252

10       Public Speaking Time. 262

11       Confirmation of Public Excluded Minutes. 262

Nil

12       Public Excluded Reports. 262

Nil

 

 


1            Welcome

2            Council Blessing

“As we deliberate on the issues before us, we trust that we will reflect positively on the  communities we serve. Let us all seek to be effective and just, so that with courage, vision and energy, we provide positive leadership in a spirit of harmony and compassion.”

I a mātou e whiriwhiri ana i ngā take kei mua i ō mātou aroaro, e pono ana mātou ka kaha tonu ki te whakapau mahara huapai mō ngā hapori e mahi nei mātou.  Me kaha hoki mātou katoa kia whaihua, kia tōtika tā mātou mahi, ā, mā te māia, te tiro whakamua me te hihiri ka taea te arahi i roto i te kotahitanga me te aroha.

3            Apologies

4            Declarations of Interest Relating to Items on the Agenda

Notification from Elected Members of:

4.1 – any interests that may create a conflict with their role as an elected member relating to the items of business for this meeting, and

4.2 – any interests in items in which they have a direct or indirect pecuniary interest as provided for in the Local Authorities (Members’ Interests) Act 1968

5            Public Speaking Time for Items Relating to the Agenda

6            Members’ Business

(a)       Public Speaking Time Responses

(b)       Leave of Absence

(c)       Matters of an Urgent Nature (advice to be provided to the Chair prior to the commencement of the meeting)

7            Mayor's Report

Nil


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

8            Reports

8.1         Appointment of Chair of District Licensing Committee (DLC)

Author:                    Leyanne Belcher, Democracy Services Manager

Authoriser:             Janice McDougall, Group Manager People and Partnerhips

 

Purpose of Report

1        This report asks Council to confirm the appointment of a named Councillor as Chair of the District Licensing Committee or authorise the Chief Executive to commence a recruitment process to appoint a commissioner as Chair of the District Licensing Committee(DLC).

Delegation

2        The Council is required to consider this matter under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (‘the Act’).

Background

3        Every territorial authority is required to appoint a DLC, which includes a Chair, Deputy Chair and ‘pool’ of list members drawn on to deal with matters.

4        At the Council Meeting of 12 December 2019 Cr Janet Holborow was appointed Deputy Chair of the DLC for 2019-2022 Triennium.

5        The other members of the DLC are, Trevor Knowles, Fraser McInnes, Susie Mills and Philip Parkinson.

6        Michael Dodson recently resigned as a member of the DLC after six and a half years dedicated service and significant contribution to the work of the DLC.

7        A change to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 in October 2019 empowered the chairperson alone to make a decision on an uncontested application for a temporary authority(s.136(4A)). This dramatically reduced the call on committee members across the country. The remaining four DLC members should provide ample coverage for the handful of hearings each year.

8        Cr Fiona Vining was the Chair of the DLC for the previous triennium but did not stand for office in the 2019 elections. In order to ensure that alcohol licensing matters could continue to be covered off, Cr Vining was appointed as commissioner from 21 October 2019 (the date she legally left office as an Elected Member) and continues in that role until such time as another commissioner is appointed.

9        At the Council Meeting of 12 December 2019 Members discussed a motion ‘That the Council instructs the Chief Executive to commence a recruitment process to identify a suitable candidate for appointment as a commissioner to act as Chair of the District Licensing Committee for a period of five years’. The motion was lost.

10      Staff were asked to bring a report back to a future Council meeting on the appointment of the DLC Chair. In particular members were interested in considering the appointment of a Councillor to the position.

Issues and Options

Issues

11      Under the provisions of the Act the chair of the DLC may be an elected member or a commissioner.

12      In relation to appointing a commissioner, section 193 (1) of the Act says:

The chief executive of a territorial authority may, on the recommendation of the territorial authority, appoint a commissioner or commissioners to any of the territorial authority’s licensing committees and any person so appointed has all the functions, powers, and duties of the chairperson of the licensing committee

13      A commissioner may hold this office up to five years, and may be reappointed for one or more further periods of up to five years. This allows for continuity across triennia which is more administratively efficient.

14      A commissioner must also be suitably qualified. The Act sets out the criteria at s.193(1) the Commissioner must meet in order to be appointed:

The chief executive may only appoint a person as a commissioner if that person is of good standing in the community and has the necessary knowledge, skill, and experience relating to matters that are likely to come before the committee

15      If Council approves the chief executive commencing a recruitment process the role will be advertised. The ‘Selecting and Appointing District Licensing Committees – a Guide for Councils ’by LGNZ, SOLGM and HPA provides information designed to facilitate a robust selection process. (See Appendix 2).

16      The appointment of a commissioner also provides the opportunity to enter into a contract for service with the appointee which could set service standards around availability, timeliness of decisions, continuous professional development (if not already provided for by a professional body) and other matters to ensure the delivery of timely accurate decisions.  

17      Alternatively, the Council may appoint an elected member as Chair of the DLC.  This is provided for in s.189(2) of the Act:

A territorial authority must appoint 1 member as the chairperson and that person must be a member of that territorial authority or a commissioner appointed to the licensing committee.

18      A councillor is eligible to be a chairperson of the DLC simply by being an elected member. 

19      A councillor may only be the chairperson of the DLC while they remain a councillor, and therefore the Council may have to appoint a new chair every three years.

20      A councillor appointed as chairperson of the DLC will be fettered in their ability to advocate on behalf of their community in relation to alcohol related matters.  For example, they will not be able to make public statements in relation to alcohol matters, and would not be able to advocate community’s views around the Council table in relation to alcohol matters.  An essential element in administrative law is the concept of nemo judex in causa sua – no person may be a judge in his or her own case. 

21      In the case of the DLC, this means the Chair must be free from perceived or actual conflicts of interest.  A councillor’s previous public statements, comments in debate around the council table or advocacy on behalf of communities in relation to alcohol matters would demonstrate a preconception which would imperil decisions handed down as DLC Chair.

22      The key issue to be resolved is whether the council wishes to appoint a commissioner(s) or a councillor(s) as chair of the DLC.  In reaching a decision, councillors should consider what their fundamental role is.

23      Councillors as governors are responsible for setting the broad policy direction of the council.  This is done through the explicit adoption of policies, or through bylaws.  In the area of alcohol related harm, the broad policy direction has been set through the District Plan, Control of Alcohol in Public Places Bylaw 2017, Trading in Public Places Bylaw 2017, and by (currently) not adopting a Local Alcohol Policy.  By not adopting a Local Alcohol Policy, the Council has accepted the default national provision of the Act as being sufficient. 

24      If councillors do want to have a greater say in how alcohol is sold and supplied in the district this is best achieved through their policy setting powers, which the DLC would be required by law to impose on applications approved.

25      If councillors want to have a greater say in an individual application, or wish to advocate for their local community, this is best achieved by objecting, or supporting their community to object, to an application.

Option 1

26      The Council agrees to confirm the appointment of a named Councillor as Chair of the District Licensing Committee.

26.1   A councillor will generally have a good understanding of the different communities and population groups within the district

26.2   A councillor will bring local knowledge to the role.

26.3   A councillor will need to balance their elected member workload, particularly if they are already employed.  This may impact on their ability to produce timely decisions.

26.4   Councillors may be put in the difficult position of making a decision that is correct in law, but which may not reflect the views of the community they represent.

26.5   A councillor is likely to require time to develop the sufficient knowledge and experience of the specific legislation, regulation, alcohol licensing, hearings and decision-making processes and the skills necessary to conduct quasi-judicial hearings.

26.6   A councillor would not be able to advocate for their local community in relation to any alcohol licensing matter.  Their democratic role as an advocate for their community will be fettered by their obligation as a quasi-judicial decision maker.

26.7   A councillor would not be able to take part in any council discussions or decision in relation to any policies developed or reviewed by the council in relation to alcohol, such as any alcohol related by-laws or any local alcohol policy.

26.8   A councillor will need to be available and active in decision making in relation to alcohol licence applications up to and during an election period.

26.9   A councillor would not be able to take any public position on any alcohol related matter nor any licence granted or declined.

26.10 The chief executive would not be able to hold a councillor to any agreed service standards.  In contrast, a Commissioner could be appointed with a contract for service which would set out expectations in terms of availability, timeliness of decisions, and reporting. 

Option 2

27      The Council agrees to authorise the chief executive to appoint a commissioner as chair of the DLC.

27.1   A commissioner can be appointed who must have relevant knowledge, skills and experience that allow a DLC to carry out its role effectively.  The Council would seek to appoint a person with an understanding of the diversity of the local community, and how alcohol related harm impacts disproportionately across different communities.

27.2   A commissioner with legal training and experience can be recruited.  This is particularly useful when applicants have legal representation at hearings.

27.3   A commissioner will generally be in a stronger position to avoid a conflict of interest or the perception of a conflict of interest.  The appointment of a commissioner will de-politicise the process and emphasise the independence and separation of the DLC from elected members.  This can allow elected members to advocate more broadly for their community by objecting to applications, or organising and assisting their communities to lodge objections.

27.4   A commissioner will stand apart from the political and democratic processes of council and will be unfettered in their impartial application of the law in relation to alcohol related applications.  They will be free to make decisions in relation to the facts, without feeling constrained by public opinion or perception.

27.5   There will be a time delay and associated cost if the Council chooses to commence a recruitment process.

27.6   There is always a risk of not attracting a pool of skilled applicants when commencing a recruitment process.  However, this risk can be mitigated by advertising widely, including professional publications.

27.7   The DLC may not reflect the community it serves, but even if the Chair is not from the area, the other DLC members are all members of the community.

28      In conclusion, the Council may appoint one of its own or authorise the appointment of a Commissioner to be Chair of the DLC.   In reaching its decision the Council should be cognisant of the foregoing matters.

Considerations

Policy considerations

29      There are no policy considerations

Legal considerations

30      Relevant legislative extracts at Appendix 2 detail functions and membership of a DLC.

Financial considerations

31      Chairs, Deputy Chair and list members are remunerated. There is sufficient funding under existing budgets.

Tāngata whenua considerations

32      The competencies for DLC members include an understanding of alcohol-related harm and its impact on Māori.

33      Should the Council resolve to authorise the chief executive to appoint a commissioner as chair of the DLC the advertisement for the role will be circulated widely through iwi networks including through the partnership body Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

34      This matter has a low level of significance under the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement planning

35      An engagement plan is not needed to implement this decision.

Publicity

36      The appointment once made will publicised through the appropriate channels, including the Council website.

 

Recommendations

37      That the Council to confirms the appointment of Cr …………………..as Chair of the District Licensing Committee

 

OR

 

38      That the Council instructs the Chief Executive to commence a recruitment process to identify a suitable candidate for appointment as a commissioner to act as Chair of the District Licensing Committee for a period of five years. That a selection panel comprising Senior Legal Counsel, Group Manager People and Partnerships, Mayor K. Gurunathan and a Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti representative undertake the interviewing process.

 

 

Appendices

1.       Selecting and Appointing Distirct Licensing Committees - a Guide for Councils

2.       Extracts from the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012  

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

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Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

Extracts from the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

 

186  Territorial authorities to appoint district licensing committees

Each territorial authority must appoint 1 or more licensing committees as, in its opinion, are required to deal with licensing matters for its district.

 

187  Functions of licensing committees

A licensing committee’s functions are—

(a) to consider and determine applications for licences and manager’s certificates; and

(b) to consider and determine applications for renewal of licences and manager’s certificates; and

(c) to consider and determine applications for temporary authority to carry on the sale and supply of alcohol in accordance with section 136; and

(d) to consider and determine applications for the variation, suspension, or cancellation of special licences; and

(e) to consider and determine applications for the variation of licences (other than special licences) unless the application is brought under section 280; and

(f) with the leave of the chairperson for the licensing authority, to refer applications to the licensing authority; and

(g) to conduct inquiries and to make reports as may be required of it by the licensing authority under section 175; and

(h) any other functions conferred on licensing committees by or under this Act or any other enactment.

 

188  Powers of licensing committees

A licensing committee has all the powers conferred on it by or under this Act or any other Act, and all powers as may be reasonably necessary to enable it to carry out its functions.

 

189  Composition of licensing committees

 

(1) Each licensing committee consists of 3 members appointed by the territorial authority for that territorial authority’s district.

(2) A territorial authority must appoint 1 member as the chairperson and that person must be a member of that territorial authority or a commissioner appointed to the licensing committee.

(3) A territorial authority may appoint a member of that territorial authority to be deputy chairperson, and act in place of the chairperson if the chairperson is unable to act because of illness or absence from New Zealand, or for other sufficient reason.

(4) While acting in place of the chairperson, the deputy chairperson is a member of the committee and has all the powers and duties of the chairperson.

(5) No act done by the deputy chairperson serving as acting chairperson in the chairperson’s absence, and no acts done by the committee while the deputy chairperson is so serving, can in any proceedings be questioned on the ground that the occasion for his or her so serving had not arisen or had ceased.

(6) The other 2 members of each licensing committee must be appointed from the territorial authority’s list maintained under section 192.

(7) For the purposes of subsection (2), a member of a territorial authority means an elected member of a territorial authority and, in relation to the Auckland Council, includes a member of the governing body (as defined in section 4 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009) or a member of a local board established under section 10 of that Act.

 

190  Meetings of licensing committees

 

(1) Meetings of a licensing committee may be held at any time and place it or its chairperson decides.

(2) At a meeting where 3 members are present, the decision of a licensing committee on any matter is determined by a majority of the valid votes recorded on it.

 

191  Quorum

(1) Except as provided in subsection (2), at any meeting of a licensing committee, the quorum necessary is 3 members.

(2) At a meeting to consider and determine an application of a kind listed in subsection (3) where no objection has been filed and no matters of opposition have been raised under section 103129, or 141, the quorum necessary is 1 member who must be the chairperson.

(3) The applications are:

(a) an application for a licence:

(b) an application for a manager’s certificate:

(c) an application for renewal of a licence or manager’s certificate.

 

192  Territorial authority to establish and maintain list of licensing committee’s members

(1) A territorial authority must either—

(a) establish, maintain, and publish its own list of persons approved to be members of the territorial authority’s licensing committee or committees; or

(b) together with 1 or more other territorial authorities, establish, maintain, and publish a combined list of persons jointly approved by those authorities to be members of the territorial authorities’ licensing committees.

(2) A territorial authority must not approve a person to be included on the list unless that person has experience relevant to alcohol licensing matters.

(3) A person may be approved for inclusion on the list for a period of up to 5 years and may be approved for any 1 or more further periods of up to 5 years.

(4) The name of a person must be removed from the list—

(a) when 5 years have elapsed since the territorial authority approved the person’s name on the list unless the approval is renewed under subsection (3); or

(b) if the person resigns or is removed under section 194.

(5) A person must not be included on the list if—

(a) the territorial authority believes that person has, directly or by virtue of his or her relationship with another person, such an involvement or appearance of involvement with the alcohol industry that he or she could not perform his or her duties without actual bias or the appearance of bias; or

(b) the person is a constable, a Medical Officer of Health, an inspector, or an employee of the territorial authority.

 

193  Appointment of commissioners

(1) The chief executive of a territorial authority may, on the recommendation of the territorial authority, appoint a commissioner or commissioners to any of the territorial authority’s licensing committees and any person so appointed has all the functions, powers, and duties of the chairperson of the licensing committee.

(2) The chief executive may only appoint a person as a commissioner if that person is of good standing in the community and has the necessary knowledge, skill, and experience relating to matters that are likely to come before the committee.

(3) A person must not be appointed as a commissioner if—

(a) the territorial authority believes that person has, directly or by virtue of his or her relationship with another person, such an involvement or appearance of involvement with the alcohol industry that he or she could not perform his or her duties without actual bias or the appearance of bias; or

(b) the person is a constable, a Medical Officer of Health, an inspector, or an employee of the territorial authority.

(4) A commissioner appointed under this section holds office for a term, stated when the commissioner is appointed, of up to 5 years and may be reappointed for 1 or more further periods of up to 5 years.

 

194  Resignation or removal

(1) A member of a licensing committee or a commissioner appointed to a licensing committee may resign from office at any time by written notice to the relevant territorial authority.

(2) A chairperson of a licensing committee ceases to be a chairperson if he or she ceases to be a member of the licensing committee’s territorial authority.

(3) The territorial authority may at any time remove a member of a licensing committee or a commissioner appointed to a licensing committee for inability to perform the functions of office, bankruptcy, neglect of duty, or misconduct, proved to the territorial authority’s satisfaction.

 

195  Fees and allowances for members

(1) A member of a licensing committee is entitled to receive remuneration not within
subsection (2) for services as a member at a rate and of a kind determined by the Minister in accordance with the fees framework.

(2) A member of the licensing committee is entitled, in accordance with the fees framework, to be reimbursed for actual and reasonable travelling and other expenses incurred in carrying out his or her office as a member.

(3) For the purposes of this section, fees framework means the framework determined by the Government from time to time for the classification and remuneration of statutory and other bodies in which the Crown has an interest.

(4) A commissioner is to be treated as a member of a licensing committee for the purposes of this section.

 

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

8.2         Draft Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 - approval for public consultation

Author:                    Nienke Itjeshorst, Sustainability & Resilience Manager

Authoriser:             Sean Mallon, Group Manager Infrastructure Services

 

Purpose of Report

1.       This report presents the proposed new Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 (hereafter referred to as ‘the draft Bylaw’) and seeks Council approval to undertake public consultation on the proposed draft Bylaw.

2.       This report is intended to be read in conjunction with the attached information:

i)          Statement of Proposal for public consultation (Appendix 1)

ii)         The proposed Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw including proposed Bylaw controls (Appendix 2)

 

Delegation

3.       Section 143 of the Local Government Act 2002 gives Council the power to make a bylaw.

Background

4.       In August 2017, the Council adopted the Wellington Region Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (2017-2023) (WMMP).  This regional-level plan was collaboratively developed and subsequently adopted by the eight territorial authorities of the Wellington Region. 

5.       Within the WMMP the eight councils agreed to investigate and if feasible develop, implement and oversee monitoring and enforcement of a regional bylaw, or a suite of regionally consistent bylaws.

6.       In May 2019, the Solid Waste Services Manager briefed Council on the potential bylaw context and the scope of (existing and new) issues to be addressed in a new regional bylaw template.

7.       A new draft Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw has subsequently been developed. In an effort to promote regional consistency across solid waste management and minimisation, the draft provisions were collaboratively developed by officers from the eight territorial authorities in the Wellington Region. The first regional template was approved by the Joint Committee of the WMMP in December 2019.

8.       Council was briefed on this first regional template (now called the draft Bylaw) on 18 February 2020 and provided formal feedback on the draft Bylaw to the Joint Committee of the WMMP at a Council meeting on 27 February 2020.

9.       For 27 February Council meeting a report was provided that discussed:

·    background information to the WMMP and the drafting process of the bylaw

·    the legislative context that sets out Council’s legal obligations to encourage effective and efficient waste management and minimisation under various Acts

·    Councils obligations with regard to reviewing bylaws made under the Local Government Act every 10 years and

·    The report provided a comparison of the draft regional template with the current Kāpiti Solid Waste Bylaw 2010 and discussed proposed new and extended provisions.

10.     The report to Council can be accessed through this link Draft Wellington Region Waste Management & Minimsation Bylaw Template 27 February.

11.     The feedback received from the eight Councils was incorporated in the draft Bylaw provisions and a legal review was carried out of the draft Bylaw in April.

12.     Officers of the eight Councils have now gone back to their respective Councils and proposed the approval of one suite of regionally consistent bylaw provisions (the draft Bylaw) for public consultation. Consultation is planned by all Councils in the period of August/September 2020.

13.     Council has the ability under the proposed Bylaw to adopt controls to support the implementation of the Bylaw by way of public notified Council resolution following the adoption of the proposed bylaw.

14.     To enhance transparency around the process of creating the proposed Bylaw, it is proposed to also publicly notify the proposed set of controls that specify operational standards relevant to waste management and minimisation within the Kāpiti Coast District. The proposed controls cover mostly already existing operational standards that currently are incorporated in the 2010 Solid Waste Bylaw provisions but these have been updated where needed to reflect the current waste collections services delivery in the District. The proposed controls are set out in schedule 1 of the Bylaw in Appendix 2 of this report.

15.     Council approval is sought to release the proposed bylaw for public consultation between 7 August and 11 September 2020. 

16.     Following public consultation, a hearing has been planned for 29 October 2020 where a summary report of submissions will be presented and submitters will be heard. The final Bylaw will be presented to Council for consideration and adoption on 26 November 2020.

Discussion of the proposed bylaw

Identified waste issues and options for management of those issues

17.     The waste management and minimisation issues and justification as to why bylaw provisions are proposed to manage these issues as the most appropriate response, have been discussed in the 27 February 2020 Council report, in more detail in the attached Statement of Proposal (Appendix 1) and in the report to the Wellington WMMP Joint Committee on 9 December 2019. The (issues and options) report to the Joint Committee can be accessed through this link WMMP Joint Committee 9 December - Issues and Options paper

18.     For the purpose of keeping this report concise and without repeating the in depth discussions of issues and proposed solutions offered in Appendix 1 and the linked reports, only a summary of the key points is offered in this report.

Summary

19.     The waste issues that were identified early in the process by the eight Councils and are now proposed to be managed through new and updated bylaw provisions include:

·    Ensuring efficient and effective waste management;

·    Managing waste storage, disposal and collection activities to minimise public nuisance issues and adverse impacts on urban amenity;

·    Littering, waste and public nuisance caused by unaddressed mail and advertising;

·    Limited, incomplete and inconsistent waste data;

·    Reducing construction and demolition (C&D) waste; and

·    Event waste management and minimisation.

20.     The proposed draft Bylaw provides a regulatory response to these issues that are present within the eight districts of the Wellington Region.

21.     Not every issue is present in the same manner in every district as there are known differences between for example the Kāpiti District and Wellington City. The draft Bylaw was developed to be comprehensive and provide a regionally consistent approach and as such covers all these issues while at the same time future proofing the bylaw for the next 10 years.

22.     The proposed Bylaw together with the proposed bylaw controls regulate these issues and a wider range of waste management and minimisation activities. 

23.     New waste management-related provisions for Kāpiti include waste management planning and service standards for multi-unit developments, and a provision to limit unnecessary distribution of unaddressed advertising material.

24.     The bylaw also contains a new set of waste minimisation standards, which are proposed to align with standards set by the seven other Councils of the Wellington Region. These provisions will enable the Councils to require the consideration of waste minimisation associated with construction and demolition projects, and establish a regional event waste minimisation planning standard. 

25.     In accordance with s155(2) of the Local Government, the proposed bylaw is considered to be the most appropriate form of bylaw and a necessary in response to the District’s waste management and minimisation-related issues.

RECOMMENDATION

26.     The Council’s existing Solid Waste Bylaw 2010 provisions need updating to reflect current service delivery standards and better support Council’s WMMP outcomes. Council also needs to review its current bylaw in accordance with Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requirements. The regional review process and timing of this process ensures that this is achieved. 

27.     The proposed draft Bylaw reflects the collaborative effort of all the territorial authorities in the region to establish a new regionally consistent regulatory framework that provides continuity for waste service operators.  It also supports a regionally consistent approach towards the promotion of waste minimisation and regulation.  

28.     For these reasons, it is considered necessary and appropriate to recommend that Council approves the proposed Bylaw for public consultation.

29.     The Council has the option to release the proposed bylaw controls for public information in conjunction with the bylaw or to release the proposed bylaw for consultation without the proposed draft controls.

30.     The first approach to release the proposed controls as schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw for public information is recommended, as it may help promote regulatory transparency and operational understanding of the bylaw.

Considerations

Policy considerations

31.     The main policy document for waste management and minimisation is the Wellington Region Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) 2017-2023.  This collaboratively developed regional-level plan identified as one of the actions the investigation and development of a regional bylaw, or a suite of regionally consistent bylaws.         

Legal considerations

32.     The Council may make bylaws under sections 145 and 146 of the LGA, for the purposes of:

a)   protecting the public from nuisance;

b)   protecting, promoting, and maintaining public health and safety;

c)   minimising the potential for offensive behaviour in public places;

d)   regulating waste management; and

e)   regulating solid waste.

33.     Under section 56 of the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 Territorial Authorities may make bylaws for a number of purposes including for example for the regulation the collection and transportation of waste.

34.     The complete legislative context for the making of bylaws relating to waste is described in detail under ‘legislative requirements’ in the Statement of Proposal attached to this report as Appendix 1.

35.     The proposed draft Bylaw including the proposed controls has been reviewed by legal experts and also by Council’s internal legal team.

36.     This regional bylaw process ensures that Kāpiti’s existing 2010 Solid Waste Bylaw is reviewed within the legal timeframes as prescribed by the LGA.

37.     The LGA 2002 also requires that Council consult with the community on the bylaw review, and give public notice of when the new bylaw comes into operation.  This report seeks Council approval to start public consultation on the draft Bylaw.

Financial considerations

38.     There are no financial considerations in relation to seeking approval for public consultation.

39.     Any additional work associated with the implementation of the proposed Bylaw and more specifically the assessment of waste minimisation plans is planned to be delivered within the team based on the assumption that two waste minimisation officers will continue to be available.

40.     A small budget for enforcement is already included in the waste management operational budgets.

Tāngata whenua considerations

41.     Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti was briefed on 30 June 2020 on the waste issues identified during the review process and on the draft Bylaw provisions that are proposed to manage and regulate those issues.

Strategic considerations

42.     The proposed draft Bylaw will support Council’s goal of reducing waste to landfill with 30% by 2026, as has been adopted through the 2017 WMMP. A new bylaw with an increased focus on reducing waste to landfill through regulations for waste minimisation also supports emissions reductions.

43.     Management of waste and litter in the public space as well as supporting reduction of waste to landfill aligns with Council’s goals of making Kāpiti an attractive and distinctive place, offer a high quality natural environment and supports An Effective Response to Climate Change (emissions reduction).

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

44.     This matter has a low level of significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Consultation already undertaken

45.     Community Board members were invited and attended the briefings held in 2019 and February 2020.

Engagement planning

46.     A communications and engagement plan has been developed to support the public consultation process. As part of consultation two walk in sessions will be held for two specific stakeholder groups; the buildings/design sector and event organisers. These stakeholder groups will also be separately notified (where possible) of the consultation in addition to the usual and required notification of consultation.

47.     The information to be made available to the public for consultation on the draft Bylaw has been produced in accordance with LGA requirements and Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Publicity

48.     Publicity and other communications have been included in the communications and engagement plan that has been developed.

 

 

Recommendations

1        That the Council approves the draft Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 for public consultation in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure as set out by the Local Government Act 2020

 

 

Appendices

1.       Appendix 1 - Statement of Proposal Draft Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020

2.       Appendix 2 - Final draft Kapiti Solid Waste Management and Minmisation Bylaw July 2020 for consultation  

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF PROPOSAL TO ADOPT THE KAPITI COAST DISTRICT COUNCIL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND MINIMISATION BYLAW 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2020


 

Contents

consultation and next steps. 3

Introduction.. 4

BACKGROUND.. 5

LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS. 5

CURRENT WASTE ISSUES AND OPTIONS TO MANAGE THESE ISSUES. 6

APPROPRIATENESS OF A BYLAW... 16

CONSIDERATION OF NZBORA.. 17

PROPOSED BYLAW SUMMARY.. 18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Have your say

The Council invites your views on the proposed new Kapiti Coast District Council Solid Waste and Minimisation Bylaw 2020. 

To have your say on the proposed Bylaw you can:
•	make a submission online via Council’s online submission portal. Go to http://consult-kapiticoast.objective.com/portal and click on ‘2020 Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw Review’.
•	email your submission form to submissions@kapiticoast.govt.nz marked draft 2020 Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw.
•	make a submission in writing, using the submission form.  Submissions can be dropped off at Council or a Council Service Centre or they can be mailed to:
Kapiti Coast District Council
Private Bag 60601
Paraparaumu 5254

•	make an oral submission. You can speak directly to the councillors as part of oral hearings. They are scheduled for Thursday 29th October 2020. Please indicate in your submission if you wish to be heard by councillors and ensure you have included your contact details. 
You can get more copies of the consultation documents online at kapiticoast.govt.nz, the Council’s Service Centres, libraries, and by emailing submissions@kapiticoast.govt.nz or by phoning 04 296 4700.
The formal consultation period will be from Friday 7 August to 5pm on Friday 11 September 2020.

Submissions will be heard on Thursday 29 October 2020.

What happens to your feedback?
Your submission, those of other submitters and will help inform Councillors and finalise the new waste management and minimisation bylaw.
consultation and next steps

1.1       Please submit your feedback on the proposed Bylaw by 5pm on Friday 11 September 2020.

1.2       A report on the submissions will be considered by Council on 26 November at the same time as Council will consider adopting the Bylaw.

a) Activity

b) Date

c)  Council approved the draft 2020 bylaw and this Statement of Proposal for public consultation

d) 30 July 2020

e) Submissions open

f)   7 August 2020

g)  Submissions close

h) 11 September 2020

i)   Hearing of submitters

j)   29 October 2020

k)  Council decision to adopt bylaw

l)   26 November 2020

 

Introduction

1.3       This Statement of Proposal presents the proposed Draft Kapiti Coast District Council Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 (hereafter the Bylaw)

1.4       The Council has reviewed the current 2010 Solid Waste Bylaw and this review process has identified issues to be addressed in order for the Bylaw to effectively provide for a better response to the Wellington Region Waste Management and Minimsation Plan (WMMP), the NZ Waste Strategy and the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, and at the same time future proof this response for the next 10 years.

1.5       The new propose Bylaw will enable the Council to meet its legal obligations and more effectively manage the negative impacts of waste on the environment and manage waste management activities in the public space, as well as ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public and those involved in waste management.

1.6       The proposed Bylaw has updated and extended the Council‘s current Solid Waste Bylaw provisions to ensure the requirements are clear, relevant and regionally consistent with current legislation, national practices, and with Council’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and broader waste minimisation goals. Three provisions in the proposed Bylaw are new for the Kāpiti District. The provisions will enable the Council to take action on particular issues where this has not previously been possible and relate to multi-unit dwellings, unaddressed mail and the introduction of waste management plans for buildings/developments.

1.7       The proposed Bylaw will be a new bylaw.  If adopted, it will be established as a standalone bylaw, and Part 7 (Solid Waste Bylaw 2010) of the existing Kapiti General Bylaw 2010 will be revoked.

1.8       This Statement of Proposal has been prepared in accordance with section 86 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and provides information about the review process and whether it is appropriate to have the proposed Bylaw for the Kāpiti Coast District.

BACKGROUND

1.9       In 2017, all eight territorial authorities (city and district councils) [1] in the Wellington Region adopted the Wellington Region Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) 2017-23.

This plan, as required under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, is the second WMMP developed collaboratively by the councils and sets a regional target to reduce the total quantity of waste sent to Class 1 landfills from 600 kilograms per person per annum to 400 kilograms per person per annum by 2026. 

To achieve this, the WMMP outlines a number of council actions for achieving effective and efficient waste management and minimisation, including working collaboratively to advance solutions to regional waste management issues.

1.10    Under the umbrella of the WMMP, the councils agreed to “investigate and if feasible develop, implement and oversee monitoring and enforcement of a regional bylaw, or a suite of regionally consistent bylaws”. In line with this decision, a joint project was set up by the councils in 2018 to review the existing solid waste bylaws around the region.

Consistent with the bylaw-related WMMP actions, the Council also has a legal obligation to review its current Solid Waste Bylaw every 10 years.

1.11    The recent review process has resulted in the development of the new proposed Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020.  This bylaw has been developed in collaboration with the eight other Councils in the Wellington region and, as proposed, reflects a suite of regionally consistent bylaw provisions.

LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS

1.12    Under section 56 of the Waste Minimisation Act, a territorial authority may make bylaws for the following purposes:

a)    prohibiting or regulating the deposit of waste:

b)    regulating the collection and transportation of waste:

c)    regulating the manner of disposal of dead animals, including their short-term storage pending disposal:

d)    prescribing charges to be paid for use of waste management and minimisation facilities provided, owned, or operated by the territorial authority:

e)    prohibiting, restricting, or controlling access to waste management and minimisation facilities provided, owned, or operated by the territorial authority:

f)     prohibiting the removal of waste intended for recycling from receptacles provided by the territorial authority by anyone other than—

-      the occupier of the property from which the waste in the receptacle has come; or

-      a person authorised by the territorial authority to remove the waste.

Bylaws made for the purposes of regulating the collection and transportation of waste may also provide for the licensing of persons who carry out the collection and transportation of waste.

1.13    The Council may also make bylaws under sections 145 and 146 of the LGA, for the purposes of:

a)          protecting the public from nuisance;

b)         protecting, promoting, and maintaining public health and safety;

c)          minimising the potential for offensive behaviour in public places;

d)         regulating waste management; and

e)         regulating solid waste.

1.14    This Bylaw is further made pursuant to section 64 of the Heath Act 1956, and section 12 of the Litter Act 1979. 

1.15    The Local Government Act 2002 requires that the Solid Waste Bylaw 2010 be reviewed by 1 July 2020, 10 years from the day it was adopted.

While undertaking this review, the LGA 2002 requires Council to consider whether the bylaw:

a)    continues to be the most appropriate way to manage waste in the District;

b)    is still the most appropriate form of bylaw; and/or

c)    gives rise to any implications under the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA).

1.16    The LGA 2002 also requires that Council consult with the community on the bylaw review, and give public notice of when the new bylaw comes into operation.  This process would involve revoking the existing Solid Waste Bylaw 2010 as part 7 of the General Bylaw 2010, and adopting the proposed Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 in its place.   

To enable public understanding of the bylaw review process and the proposed amendments, the LGA 2002 requires Council to present this Statement of Proposal.

  CURRENT WASTE ISSUES AND OPTIONS TO MANAGE THESE ISSUES

1.17    The waste issues that have been identified and considered in this bylaw review include:

a)        Ensuring efficient and effective waste management;

b)    Managing waste storage, disposal and collection activities to minimise public nuisance issues and adverse impacts on urban amenity;

c)        Reducing kerbside waste;

d)    Littering, waste and public nuisance caused by unaddressed mail and advertising;

e)        Limited, incomplete and inconsistent waste data;

f)         Reducing construction and demolition (C&D) waste; and

g)        Event waste management and minimisation.

Each issue is discussed in more detail, along with information about any proposed bylaw changes.

Ensuring efficient and effective waste management

Kerbside collection services

1.18    Kerbside waste collection services in the Kāpiti Coast District are provided by a variety of commercial providers and by the Council for public litter bins. Regulatory requirements and controls are necessary in order to set clear and transparent kerbside waste and recycling collection standards applicable to all waste and recycling service providers, but also for the users of these services.

1.19    Community education promoting the correct use of kerbside collection systems is essential for ensuring a collection service is effective and efficient. However, despite education being an effective tool for promoting understanding and behaviour change, it does not provide a satisfactory solution for a small percentage of people who knowingly breach collection rules.

Bylaw controls therefore remain an essential regulatory mechanism for the maintenance and potential enhancement of efficient and effective waste management operations across the city.

Managing dangerous, hazardous and/or infectious waste

1.20    The current Bylaw prohibits the deposit of prohibited waste items and hazardous waste in Council approved receptacles. Regulating the disposal of dangerous, hazardous and infectious materials continuous to be necessary and Bylaw provisions must ensure that any risks such materials pose to human health, environmental wellbeing, and waste service provider safety are minimised and where possible avoided.

1.21    As such, the use of a non-regulatory approach (community education encouraging best practice behavior and making drop off services available) is considered insufficient. This approach needs to be supported by Bylaw provisions.

In line with guiding legislation, specifically section 145(b) LGA 2002, and sections 23(e) and s64(1)(a) of the Health Act, a Bylaw remains the most appropriate regulatory tool for controlling the deposition of dangerous, hazardous and infectious substances within the waste stream.



Managing waste storage, disposal and collection activities to minimise public nuisance issues and adverse impacts on urban amenity

1.22    Waste and recycling collection activities in the public space have the potential to reduce the level of amenity enjoyed within the urban environment and to create public nuisance issues. This can include:

·         the siting of wheelie bins in a manner that impedes footpath access;

·         noise disturbance associated with collection activities; and

·         inappropriate waste disposal in public places and on private property.

1.23    The existing Bylaw already provides these controls, but requires updating to ensure it can better address the issues associated with the increased use of various types of wheeliebins, the illegal disposal of waste, and the misuse of public collection points.

1.24    While community education may be effective in promoting behaviour change for kerbside service users, it is important to set clear minimum operational standards for the public space to work towards.  The effectiveness of community education is likely to be limited where practices will result in a cost saving or time saving by a service user or service provider.

For this reason, the use of community education is best supported by Bylaw provisions that provide minimum regulatory standards that service users and providers should meet. A Bylaw is the primary regulatory tool available to the Council to effectively address these waste-related public nuisance and amenity issues.

Ensuring efficient and appropriate waste management storage and servicing for multi-unit developments

1.25    As urban densities increase, not just in the Wellington Region’s cities but also in the Kāpiti Coast District in the next 10 years, the inadequate provision of on-site waste management storage and servicing areas has the potential to cause issues within the public space in urban (high density) areas. 

1.26    The inappropriate design of waste storage and servicing areas in multi-unit developments (developments with 10 or more residential units) can create difficult-to-access or no-access sites for waste collection vehicles. Insufficient space for waste and recycling receptacles, and inappropriately designed and located storage areas within the development, can also be problematic for residents, constraining them to sustainably manage and divert/minimise their waste.

1.27    In turn, associated waste and recycling servicing can create public place nuisance issues caused by the deposit of waste and a loss of amenity in the adjoining public space. As such, waste management for multi-unit developments is a specific category of residential waste that requires additional consideration in order to minimise public nuisance issues and adverse impacts on urban amenity.

1.28    Whilst the Building Code (Clause G15 Solid Waste) stipulates that such “buildings shall be provided with space and facilities for the collection, and safe hygienic holding prior to disposal, of solid waste arising from the intended use of the buildings”, this clause does not apply to multi-unit dwellings if there is an independent access, or if there is a private open space at the ground level.

For this reason, the Building Code provisions are considered inadequate both for amenity protection and for accommodating the waste management needs of residents. An exemption from Clause G15 does not guarantee that the provision of an independent site access means that the development is designed with sufficient on site waste and recycling storage areas or that the provision of private open space is available or accessible for waste storage and servicing needs.

Where Clause G15 is deemed applicable to a development, it does not specify a minimum site size for on-site waste and recycling storage. [2]When considering potential solutions, it is important to differentiate between existing legally constructed multi-unit developments, and new (yet to be established) multi-unit developments. The use of a regulatory mechanism as a means to address the issues is only appropriate with respect to new multi-unit developments or buildings being converted into multi-unit developments.

Currently existing multi-unit developments are anticipated to be legally constructed in accordance with regulatory standards. Therefore, the Council cannot retrospectively apply new building development (design) standards to these buildings. However, the Council can regulate waste and recycling service collection requirements to both new and existing multi-unit developments.

1.29    For new multi-unit developments (and conversions), there are two main regulatory options available to Council in order to manage the design of storage and access.  These include the introduction of amended or new District Plan requirements or the introduction of revised waste bylaw controls.

1.30    Currently the Kāpiti Coast District Council District Plan doesn’t include a definition for multi-unit developments as such, but there are requirements for medium density housing developments to provide for waste collection and service points as well as provide for screening of waste collection areas. These requirements cover the outdoor areas and focus on individual units/dwellings, whereas the proposed Bylaw provisions would allow Council to require a waste management plan that covers a wider array of requirements to ensure effective waste management for multi-unit developments.

1.31    As part of future reviews of the District Plan, the current requirements have the potential to be re-considered and amended as higher density housing increases to cover waste issues in multi-unit dwellings, but as long as that has not happened, bylaw provisions to encourage better planning and provision of waste facilities and servicing for multi-unit dwellings are considered to be appropriate.

1.32    With increasing levels of intensification also expected in the Kāpiti Coast District over the next decade, issues caused by inadequate waste management and storage facilities in multi-unit developments can be anticipated to increase. The Bylaw should provide the Council with the ability to require better consideration and provision of waste management for multi-unit developments.

The bylaw provision for Multi-Unit Dwellings will come into force 6 months after the commencement of the new Bylaw to allow for setting up a process to manage engaging with regulatory Council teams as well as with stakeholders in the early stages of design and establish a collaborative and supportive approach to submitting waste management plans.

Reducing kerbside waste

1.33    The use of non-regulatory action and the provision of kerbside recycling are important and necessary for waste minimisation behaviour change within the community. However, the relative effectiveness of these options for minimising waste should be considered against the region’s moderate to high per capita waste to landfill disposal rate. While community education has the potential to decrease waste generation and increase the diversion of waste from landfill to reuse or recycling, the effectiveness of waste minimisation services could also be increased through appropriate Bylaw provisions and controls.

1.34    Potential opportunities to reduce kerbside waste within the proposed Bylaw are connected to:

·    Licensing operators to ensure the appropriate collection, storage and processing of waste and recycling material;

·    Requiring business name identification and contact details to be provided on all waste and recycling containers used for collection from public places;

 

·    Providing the ability to require content control messaging on all kerbside waste and recycling containers;

·    Providing the ability to establish controls requiring waste separation, for example limiting the amount of green waste material allowed to be disposed of into residential kerbside waste receptacles and requiring recyclables to be clean; and

·    Providing the ability to establish a maximum size limit for residential waste containers, as it would be useful to have this option available if such an approach is considered appropriate in the future.

1.35    It needs to be noted that Kāpiti was the first (and currently still the only) district in the Wellington Region to introduce licensing of operators and collectors in 2010 under the current Bylaw and since then private waste collectors and waste facility operators have been licensed by the Council. (Please also refer to discussion below on data collection. The first two bullet points are opportunities that already have been implemented as a result of licensing.)

Littering, waste and public nuisance caused by unaddressed mail and advertising

1.36    The practice of depositing advertising material in mailboxes and on car windows is common. The inappropriate disposal or depositing of such unaddressed mail in already full mailboxes can result in public nuisance issues for residents, litter in our streets and increased waste to landfill. It is currently estimated that 30kg of advertising circulars are delivered to each New Zealand home every year.

1.37    When waste is deposited in a public place (e.g. on car windscreens and handing out advertising flyers to the public), the resulting litter and waste often becomes the liability of the Council for removal and disposal. Council has no ability to recover the costs of removal or disposal by the waste generators.

1.38    The Council has three options available in order to address this issue: reliance on voluntary codes of practice, community education/promotional strategies, and bylaw regulation.

1.39    The voluntary Marketing Association Code of Practice for the distribution of unaddressed mail already exists. This voluntary standard advocates for the honouring of household “No Junk Mail” requests by advertisers, and is a standard that is, in principle, widely accepted by the marketing industry and endorsed by the Marketing Association and the New Zealand Retailers Association.

1.40    A number of residents choose to use letterbox stickers to specify the rejection of unaddressed mail but despite the availability and use of these stickers, numerous retailers and service providers (including real estate agents) continue to deliver unaddressed mail to non-stickered mailboxes, often resulting in overflowing mailboxes which in turn cause litter in the public space. This situation suggests that on its own, a voluntary approach is limited in its ability to address this issue.

1.41    The main advantage of regulating unaddressed mail through the proposed Bylaw is that it has universal application and will apply to all advertisers. A Bylaw response clarifying the acceptable and unacceptable ‘deposit’ of unaddressed mail is considered appropriate for better managing this issue.

For clarity; the proposed bylaw provision does not prohibit the delivery of unaddressed mail to non-stickered letter boxes, as the owners of the letterboxes have not indicated they do not want to receive these materials. The provision does however prohibit the deposit of these materials in non-stickered letterboxes that are already full, in stickered letterboxes altogether and on any vehicle parked in a public place. This makes is clear that the purpose of the provision is to restrict littering, not advertising, in the public space.

 


Limited, incomplete and inconsistent waste data

1.42    The limited and inconsistent nature of regional waste and recycling sector data currently constrains the waste sector’s (including local councils) understanding of waste issues.

1.43    Section 56(3)(b) of the WMA enables territorial authorities to require the provision of waste data from operators through operator licensing. Licensing may also stipulate conditions that require a performance bond, security, or both for the performance of the work licensed, and reports setting out the quantity, composition, and destination of waste collected and transported by the licensee (for example, household waste to a disposal facility).

1.44    The establishment of waste collector and operator licensing for the region has the potential to address this data issue. Licensing of private servicing providers will be more effective when coordinated at the regional level and when developed regionally to give effect to the National Waste Data Framework.

1.45    Kāpiti Coast District Council has been licensing private collectors and operators since 2010 and has, as a result, better aggregated data on waste streams. However, creating a regionally consistent licensing system will improve overall data capture.

1.46    From a collectors’/operators’ perspective, a regionally coordinated waste operator licensing regime would provide a ‘level’ playing field across the region, with the same requirements applying in each district/city.

1.47    Engagement with waste industry stakeholders in our region in 2018 has confirmed that requesting the voluntary provision of waste data would not secure the provision of data for the Councils. Accordingly, a number of territorial authorities in New Zealand have already established licensing via bylaw provisions in order to secure the provision of waste data.

As such, a bylaw is considered the only mechanism available to the Council to effectively address this issue. It is noted that appropriate data confidentiality protocols will need to be applied to safeguard the commercial viability of the waste operators supplying the data.

Reducing construction and demolition (C&D) waste

1.48    Construction and demolition activity can generate substantial quantities of waste material, much of which is potentially recoverable, such as brick and concrete, timber, plasterboard and metal. In 2013/14, approximately 32,099 tonnes of waste sent to municipal (Class 1) landfills in the Wellington Region was construction and demolition waste (being 12.7% of the Class 1 Landfill waste stream). However, available data also indicates that the majority of C&D waste is currently being sent to Class 2-4 landfills (landfills that accept non-putrescible wastes such as C&D waste and cleanfill).

1.49    In 2015 Class 2-4 landfill operators reported their C&D waste tonnages to be approximately 525,000 tonnes per annum. This converts into a per capita disposal rate of 1.06 tonnes per capita per annum (Wellington Region Waste Assessment, 2016, p.55). As a significant part of this waste stream is potentially recoverable, the Assessment identified construction and demolition waste as a priority waste stream that could be targeted by councils as a means to reduce waste to landfill (2016, p.87).

Currently it’s estimated that 63% of Kāpiti’s waste to landfill consists of C&D waste of which a large portion could be recovered (Waste Minimisation Taskforce Final report December 2020)Final report of the Waste Minimisation Taskforce

1.50    In late 2018, councils from the Wellington Region jointly commissioned a report from Tonkin & Taylor Ltd to analyse the waste minimisation issues and challenges associated with C&D waste, and to identify the range of options available to councils in response to these issues.

1.51    The key issues include, but are not limited to, constrained capacity to process and recover C&D waste, the availability of low cost disposal for C&D waste close to where many major projects are occurring, and a lack of incentives that would encourage or promote C&D waste minimisation.

1.52    While some of the identified options are not within the scope of Council’s role (e.g. increasing the waste levy to incentivise diversion of C&D waste), some options exist for the Council to advance C&D waste minimisation. Such initiatives could include investing in C&D waste processing activities to stimulate the recovery market, and incorporating C&D waste minimisation into Council procurement considerations.

1.53    Alternatively, the Council could continue to rely on voluntary waste minimisation practices and sustainability certifications (e.g. the GreenStar building rating system) to promote C&D waste minimisation. This option reflects the current situation. However, despite being useful to reduce C&D waste on discrete projects, it is limited in its capacity to promote or bring about significant reductions in the amount of C&D waste generated in Wellington City or across the Region.

1.54    The establishment of Bylaw provisions that require the consideration of C&D waste minimisation associated with large commercial building projects exists as a starting point for C&D waste minimisation. Bylaw provisions have the potential to require the consideration of C&D waste minimisation design, planning, materials recovery and reuse.

1.55    It is important to recognise that the establishment of such Bylaw provisions alone will not significantly reduce the amount of C&D waste produced within the region in the absence of changes occurring in the Wellington Region waste market. Currently within the Wellington region, the disposal of C&D waste to Class 2-4 landfills is relatively cheap in comparison to disposal to Class 1 municipal landfill waste. In Kāpiti there are currently very few C&D waste and cleanfill disposal options, resulting in the majority of these wastes being transported to Class 2-4 landfills located near Wellington or these wastes ending up as part of the municipal waste stream into the Kāpiti transfer stations.

1.56    C&D diversion would be incentivised mostly and become more commercially viable if the cost of C&D waste disposal was to increase and if good alternative recovery options became available.

1.57    The Ministry for the Environment recently consulted on a potential increase, and expansion of the scope, of the waste disposal levy. The waste disposal levy is a $10 levy that is currently charged to each tonne disposed of in a landfill. This charge is generally passed on to the disposer as part of disposal charges. It’s the Minister’s clear intention to increase the levy per tonne within the next year and this increase has the potential to increase the price of a C&D waste disposal in the region.

This increase in disposal cost would act as an incentive for industry to divert and recycle C&D waste. If this was to happen, the existence of Council required C&D waste minimisation plans would become a valuable tool for identifying the potentially divertible and recyclable waste material streams. Such plans would also contribute to the success of any C&D diversion facilities established within the region.

1.58    Bylaw provisions that require C&D waste management and minimisation planning on large C&D projects consequently could hold a key role in promoting C&D waste minimisation in the Wellington region.

1.59    The Bylaw provision that allows Council to set a control requiring C&D waste management and minimsation planning will not come into force immediately when the new Bylaw comes into force, as it is acknowledged that in Kāpiti work needs to be done first to establish increased and improved recovery and recycling alternatives for the local building industry. As part of that work Council will also consider what the most appropriate value would be of a building project on the coast to trigger the requirement of providing a C&D waste management and minimisation plan.

Event waste management and minimisation

1.60    Large public events, such as outdoor festivals, parades and concerts have the potential to generate a significant amount of waste. However, as the amount of waste being generated at events typically remains unreported, the total volume of event waste generated within the district and across the region remains unknown. Large amounts of waste produced can also result in litter issues in and around the event area and adjoining public areas.

1.61   In response to this issue, Kāpiti Coast District Council already included a waste during events provision in the 2010 Bylaw.  In provision 10 of the existing Bylaw, it is stated that the organiser of an event that requires resource consent under our District Plan may be required to provide a waste management plan for the event. Since this provision was inlcuded in 2010, a few waste management plans have been put forward to Council for assessment but in general they have not been required.

Instead, waste minimisation staff have been leading the way to make all Council events zero waste events, working with food vendors on compostable food packaging and setting up recycling stations with monitors.  Waste minimisation staff have also worked with private organisors to establish the same for their events. Council has, for example, made the bin hoods for recycling stations available for event organisers free of charge, provided information and advice, and organised volunteers if needed. Also a new guide “Reducing waste at your event” has been developed by the regional officers group and workshops for organisors are being held.

1.62    If event organisers voluntarily choose to run waste free events, or promote recycling and organics diversion at events, it has the dual benefit of normalising and promoting waste minimisation behaviour change within the community, and reducing the amount of waste sent to landfill.

1.63    However, as event organisers may be able to save time and money by ignoring event waste reduction guidelines and techniques, and by sending all of their accumulated event waste to landfill, voluntary approaches to event waste minimisation are consequently limited in their capacity to reduce waste.

1.64    From a regional perspective, due to the limited effectiveness of non-regulatory event waste management approaches, a bylaw provision is considered the most appropriate means to address these event waste-related issues. The use of regionally consistent bylaw provisions would establish basic waste-related planning considerations for large events throughout the region and support the regional education approach. For the implementation of this provision in the proposed Bylaw, an event will be considered ‘significant’ if it has an expected attendance of 1,000 or more people across the duration of the event.

1.65    It is proposed to delay the commencement of this provision to 1 July 2021 to allow Council to work in partnership with the other Wellington councils to establish further appropriate guidance and resourcing to support event managers.

Setting controls under the new Bylaw

1.66    Under provision 7 of the Bylaw Council can make, amend or revoke controls for the safe and efficient operation of waste collection services from a public place. Controls that can be set by Council resolution are listed in provision 7.2. Before making, amending or revoking any controls, Council must comply with the rules for public consultation as set out in Subpart 1 of Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002. Any resolution made by Council in relation to a control must be made publically available.

1.67    The controls that are proposed to be set by Council resolution following Bylaw adoption (which will happen at the same Council meeting) are attached to this proposal for enhanced transparency. In summary the proposed controls:

·    Set out what approved receptacles are for waste and recycling collections in the District;

·    Set out the permitted times and days for waste collection services;

·    Set out requirements for the separation of waste types in the approved receptacles

·    Restrict the storage of waste in public places

·    Restrict the deposit of specific waste material including prohibited waste

The proposed Bylaw and associated controls will apply throughout the Kāpiti Coast District. Controls for C&D waste management plans will be set by Council resolution if and when improved recovery and recycling options are available.

APPROPRIATENESS OF A BYLAW

1.68    When making or reviewing bylaws, Council is required by the LGA 2002 to ensure the bylaw is necessary and is the most appropriate form of a bylaw.

Most Appropriate Way to Address the Problems/Issues

1.69    The discussion above outlines the range of waste management issues relevant to the Kāpiti Coast District and the Wellington Region and the options considered to address these issues.

1.70    In summary, while non-regulatory guidance (e.g. community education, guidelines and information provision) and appropriate operational practices can help address a range of waste management issues, bylaw regulation is necessary as a means to establish a range of baseline waste management and minimisation standards for waste service users and service providers.

Together, regulatory standards, non-regulatory actions and operational practice will support the delivery of effective and efficient waste management and minimisation within the Kāpiti District.

1.71    While some of the provisions in the Bylaw have the potential to be covered by common law remedies, such as public nuisance or negligence offences, it is preferable for the Council to retain provisions in the Bylaw for these matters.

Most Appropriate Form of Bylaw

1.72    The proposed Bylaw effectively and efficiently addresses the identified issues by addressing a number of unwanted consequences resulting from the management and minimisation of waste.  The proposed Bylaw also provides flexibility and allows for changing circumstances to be recognised by enabling Council to be able to take action on matters if required.

1.73    Controls (rules) to support the implementation of the proposed Bylaw can be made by Council resolution following Bylaw adoption. This separation allows the controls to be amended as appropriate rather than requiring a full review of the Bylaw. This gives Council the necessary flexibility to recognise that changes may be needed to procedures or other associated implementation matters over time.

1.74    The proposed Bylaw clearly states the Council’s position by stating whether an activity is permitted or prohibited. The proposed Bylaw sets out what action needs to be taken to comply with it, for example, whether prior written permission of the Council is required. It also sets out some considerations that will be taken into account in granting consents.

1.75    The proposed Bylaw is consistent with the goals, aims and actions of the WMMP goals identified by the Council.

1.76    The review of Council’s current Solid Waste Bylaw provisions has also considered whether the proposed Bylaw should remain part of the General Bylaw 2010 or be split into a stand-alone bylaw as has recently been done with other Council bylaws. Standalone bylaws are now common practice with other Councils, and are considered to provide advantages including:

·    Improved interpretation and understanding of bylaws with all relevant information located together within a single document, and

·    Allowing the Council to establish a more staggered and clear approach to reviewing its bylaws.

1.77    The proposal is that the Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 would be established as a standalone bylaw, in effect, replacing the existing bylaw provisions in Part 7 of Council’s General Bylaw 2010. Part 7 of the existing General Waste Bylaw would be revoked.

1.78    For these reasons, Council considers that a Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw continues to be necessary and the most appropriate way to manage waste in the District.

CONSIDERATION OF NZBORA

1.79    Before making a bylaw, section 155 of the Local Government Act requires the Council to determine whether the bylaw gives rise to any implications under the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA”).  No bylaw may be made which is inconsistent with the NZBORA. 

1.80    Section 5 of the NZBORA provides for justified limitations on rights, specifically that the rights and freedoms contained in the NZBORA may be subject only to such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.

1.81    The only rights or freedoms under the NZBORA potentially engaged by the proposed Bylaw are likely to be the rights to freedom of movement and freedom of expression. Limitations on these rights must be no more than is reasonably necessary to achieve the purpose of the Bylaw. The proposed Bylaw limits these rights only to the extent that they create a danger to health and safety or a nuisance to others or the public generally, or create the potential for environmental harm.  In addition, while the Bylaw will require waste collectors and operators to be licensed and comply with minimum standards, it does not limit public access to these services. The Bylaw only controls the methods used to carry out these services in order to meet waste management goals.

1.82    The proposed Bylaw does not raise any implications under and is not inconsistent with the NZBORA, because any limitations of the rights in question are justified in accordance with the NZBORA.

PROPOSED BYLAW SUMMARY

The Bylaw must be consistent with the WMMP. The proposed Bylaw supports the key goals of the WMMP which include maximising opportunities to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill, reduce the harmful and costly effects of waste, and improve efficiency of resource use.

Summary of key changes proposed

Waste management responsibilities

Current bylaw:

Outlines some responsibilities but not in a comprehensive manner.

Proposed Bylaw:

Provides greater clarity and detail in terms of the general and specific responsibilities of owners, managers and occupiers of premises, and of waste collectors and waste operators.

 

Licensing of waste collectors and operators

Current bylaw:

There is a licensing requirement in the current bylaw

Proposed Bylaw:

Introduces additional considerations that Council may take into account when considering a licence application and lists additional terms and conditions Council may include in the licence.

 

The provision establishes a regional mandatory registration (licensing) system for waste collectors and waste operators to enable Councils to:

·      Effectively regulate private collection services to ensure they are aligned with the WMMP and Council’s waste management objectives

·      Collect better data on waste streams, waste management and service operations, and

·      Fulfil its responsibilities to promote effective and efficient waste management and minimisation. 

 

As licensing in Kapiti is already in place, the new provisions will be considered when licenses are reviewed where appropriate and practical (taking into account that establishing an appropriate regional system (and resourcing) will take time and that this provision will come into effect in the other districts/cities of the region on a later date.

 

Waste Management for Multi-Unit Developments

Current bylaw:

There are no requirements for dealing with waste generated by multi-unit developments.

Proposed Bylaw:

Multi-unit developments (defined under the proposed Bylaw as 10 or more residential units) such as apartments, townhouses, retirement villages and gated communities have the potential to be problematic in terms of waste management and minimisation, particularly if inadequate provision is made for waste storage and servicing within the development. The proposed provision provides the ability to Council to make a control that requires appropriate planning and provision for waste management in all multi-unit developments, and ensures that adequate provision is made for waste management facilities and servicing in new multi-unit developments.

Waste Management for Events

Current bylaw:

There is a provision in the current bylaw for waste management for events. A waste management plan may be required by Council.

Proposed Bylaw:

The provision requires the preparation of a waste management plan (for approval by Council) for public events of a significant scale (an expected attendance of 1,000 or more people over its duration) that will generate waste (exceptions apply). The intent is to encourage better planning and management of waste and to ensure adequate provision is made for waste management facilities and services for events.

 

It is proposed to delay the commencement of this provision with 6 months to 1 July 2021 to allow Council to work in partnership with the other Wellington councils to establish further appropriate guidance to support event managers, and the collection and analysis of the waste data provided.

 

Management of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Waste

Current bylaw:

There are no requirements for dealing with waste generated by C&D activities.

Proposed Bylaw:

Waste generated from construction and demolition activities can be a significant issue. The provisions provide the ability for Council to make a control to require the preparation of a waste management plan (for approval by Council) for building work over a certain specified dollar value (as set by Council).  Providing the ability for Council to set a control to require the preparation of a waste management plan aims to reduce waste by encouraging the consideration of waste issues early in the building/ construction process. It also supports the WMMP objectives for construction and demolition waste. 

 

It will help improve local and regional data on the management of construction and demolition waste, encourage reuse and recycling, and help ensure residual materials are taken to an appropriate disposal or recovery facility. Better data will also support increased understanding of construction and demolition waste issues and will inform and support the development of appropriate tools to help manage the issues.

 

The supporting control setting the estimated value over which it will be required to submit a C&D waste management plan will be developed in conjunction with developing improved options for recovery and recycling in the District before any control is set by public Council resolution.

 


The proposed Bylaw is attached to this proposal. The following provides a summary outline of the key sections of the proposed Bylaw.

 

Outline of proposed Bylaw provisions

 

Clause

Description

Purpose / Reasons

PART A: INTRODUCTION

1

Title and Application

Specifies the title of the Bylaw and the district to which it applies.

2

Commencement

Specifies the date the Bylaw is adopted by Council and comes into effect. Also lists some exceptions to allow for the delayed start of some Bylaw provisions (e.g. event waste management plans) to give Council time to put in place appropriate implementation, mechanisms and systems.

3

Revocation

Confirms the existing Bylaw that the proposed Bylaw will replace.

4

Purpose

Explains why the Bylaw has been adopted, the context for the Bylaw, its intention and the key outcomes it seeks to achieve. Also identifies the relevant legislation the Bylaw is made under. 

5

Compliance with Bylaw

Provides clarity and specifies that no person can act in a way that is not in accordance with the Bylaw, and that compliance with the Bylaw doesn’t remove the need to comply with any other applicable legislation, regulation, Council bylaws or rules of law.

6

Interpretation

Supports the interpretation and implementation of the Bylaw. Defines key terms used in the Bylaw. Where possible, defined terms from existing relevant legislation, Council plans or national strategies and guidelines have been used.

7

Controls

Enables the Council to make/amend/revoke specific controls to support the implementation of the Bylaw. Controls can be used to prohibit, restrict or control any matter related to waste deposit, collection, transportation, storage or disposal from any property or premises. Controls must be made by a resolution of Council that is made publicly available. The clause provides assurance to any person as to the process that will be undertaken to make controls. Confirms that Council is complying with its significance and engagement policy.

PART B: DEPOSIT, COLLECTION, TRANSPORTATION, STORAGE, PROCESSING AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE

8

General responsibilities

Outlines the general responsibilities of all people and agencies for solid waste management and minimisation under the Bylaw. Includes households, occupiers, and the owners and managers of any premises.  Provides clarity as to what the expectations are in terms of waste disposal, storage, transportation and collection and who is responsible for what.

9

Waste collections from a public place

Sets out basic requirements for waste collections from any public place. Explains what waste is acceptable for collection and what types of waste must not be placed in a public place for collection. Also enables Council to ensure waste collection receptacles provided for waste collections (approved containers, bins, bags etc) are appropriate, fit for purpose, and are labelled clearly and appropriately.

10

Approved Collection Points

Provided for clarity and ensures Council can set controls in relation to approved collection points for the collection of waste (for example, in rural areas or any areas not served by kerbside services).

11

Licensing of Waste Collectors and Waste Operators

Requires waste collectors and waste operators to obtain an approval (licence) from Council. Provides the ability for Council to take action if a licensed waste collector or operator is not fulfilling their requirements under the Bylaw.

12

Multi-Unit Developments

 

Provides the ability for Council to make a control to require the preparation of a waste management plan (for approval by Council) for new multi-unit developments, and for existing developments where there are issues in terms of inadequate provision for waste storage and disposal. Enables councils to set controls, if required, in relation to the deposit, collection, transportation or storage of waste from multi-unit developments. Supports the achievement of the goals and actions set out in the WMMP and clarifies waste management roles and responsibilities during planning, construction and occupation of multi-unit developments.

13

Events

Requires the preparation of a waste management plan (for approval by Council) for public events of a significant scale (an expected attendance of 1,000 or more people over its duration) that will generate waste (exceptions apply). The intent is to encourage better planning and management of waste and to ensure adequate provision is made for waste management facilities and services for events. The proposed 6 months delay in the commencement of these provisions under the Bylaw (refer clause 2) allows Council to work in partnership with the other Wellington councils to establish appropriate guidance and resourcing to support waste plan development and the collection and analysis of the data provided.

14

Construction Site and Demolition Waste Management Plans

Provides the ability for Council to make a control to require the preparation of a waste management plan (for approval by Council) for building work over a certain specified dollar value (as set by Council).  The focus is on builds that generate significant amounts of waste.

15

Inorganic waste

This clause can be used by Council (if and as may be needed) to ensure that any potential inorganic collection service can be regulated and managed appropriately and issues like scavenging can be prevented.

16

Nuisance and litter

Supports the Council to take action on issues such as responsibility for waste or diverted material accumulations, use of approved receptacles, the burying of waste, waste disposal or scavenging, to ensure that they do not become offensive, a public nuisance, or likely to be injurious to health.

17

Unaddressed mail and advertising material

This clause supports and enables Council to regulate and take action on waste and litter issues that are caused by unaddressed mail and advertising material.

18

Donation Collection Points

There can be a number of waste-related issues associated with donation collection points on public places such as illegal dumping, littering and scavenging.  This clause gives Council the ability to manage and prevent any such issues.

PART 3: OTHER MATTERS

19

General Offences and Penalties

This clause sets out the enforcement action available to Council for breaches of the Bylaw and any controls made under it.  In some cases enforcement is easier and more effective through other mechanisms such as the Litter Act; but in other cases specific provision needs to be made through this Bylaw.

20

Other Enforcement Powers

 

Provides for additional enforcement action to be taken by Council under the Bylaw where the specific provisions of a sub-section enable other actions, besides prosecution, to be taken. For example, the withdrawal or suspension of waste collection services for non-compliance with the Bylaw requirements, or the issue of a written warning or suspension of a waste collection licence for non-compliance with the licence terms and conditions.

21

Exceptions and Saving Provisions

Provided for clarity.

22

Fees

Provided for clarity.  The Council may in accordance with the provisions of section 150 of the Local Government Act 2002 set prescribed fees under this Bylaw, and may refund, remit or waive any fee as it sees fit.

23

Forms and processes

Provided for clarity.

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

DRAFT Kāpiti Solid Waste Management & Minimisation Bylaw

ID#

Clause

Draft bylaw text

PART A: INTRODUCTION

1

Title and Application

1.1  The title of this Bylaw is the “Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020”. 

 

1.2  This Bylaw applies within the boundaries of the Kāpiti Coast District.

2

Commencement

2.1  This Bylaw comes into force on 1 January 2021 except for the following exception which comes into force on the date specified:

(a)   The event waste management plan provisions under clause 13 come into force 6 months after the commencement date of this bylaw

(b)   The Multi-Unit Developments provisions under clause 12 come into force 6 months after the commencement date of this bylaw.

3

Revocation

3.1  This Bylaw repeals and replaces the Kāpiti Coast District Solid Waste Bylaw 2010 and Part 7 of the General Bylaw 2010.

 

4

Purpose

4.1  The purpose of this Bylaw is to support:

(a)   The promotion and delivery of effective and efficient waste management and minimisation in the Kāpiti Coast District as required under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008;

(b)   The implementation of the Wellington Region Waste Management and Minimisation Plan;

(c)   The purpose of the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and the goals in the New Zealand Waste Strategy 2010, being to encourage waste minimisation and a decrease in waste disposal in order to protect the environment from harm; and provide environmental, social, economic, and cultural benefits;

(d)   The regulation of waste collection, transport and disposal,  including recycling, waste storage and management;

(e)   Controls regarding the responsibilities of customers who use approved solid waste services, and the licensing of waste collectors and waste operators;

(f)    The protection of the health and safety of waste collectors, waste operators and the public; and

(g)   The management of litter and nuisance relating to waste in public places. 

 

4.2  This Bylaw is made pursuant to section 56 of the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, sections 145 and 146 of the Local Government Act 2002, section 64 of the Heath Act 1956, and section 12 of the Litter Act 1979. 

5

Compliance with Bylaw

5.1  No person may deposit, collect, transport, sort, process, treat or dispose of waste other than in accordance with this Bylaw.

 

5.2  To avoid doubt, compliance with this Bylaw does not remove the need to comply with all other applicable Acts, regulations, bylaws, and rules of law. 

6           Interpretation

 

6.1  For this Bylaw, unless the context otherwise requires, the following term definitions apply[3]:

 

Term:

Means:

 

Act (the Act)

Waste Minimisation Act 2008

 

Advertising material

Any message which:

(a)   Has printed content controlled directly or indirectly by the advertiser; and

(b)  Is expressed in any language and communicated in any medium with the intent to influence the choice, opinion or behaviour of a person.

Approved

Authorised in writing by the Council.

Approved collection point(s)

Council approved places, facilities or receptacle where approved receptacles may be left for collection or waste may be deposited.

Approved receptacle

Any container, bag or other receptacle that has been approved by the Council for the collection of any type of waste or diverted material, with approval based on the following criteria: the prevention of nuisance, the provision for adequate security to prevent scavenging, the protection of the health and safety of waste collectors and the public, and the achievement of effective waste management and minimisation. 

Authorised officer

Any officer of the Council or other person authorised by the Council to administer and enforce its bylaws, and any person appointed especially or generally by the Council to enforce the provisions of this Bylaw.

Building work

As defined in the Building Act 2004 and includes any work for, or in connection with, the construction, alteration, demolition, or removal of a building. It can include sitework and design work relating to the building work.

 

Bylaw

This Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020.

Cleanfill material

Waste that meets all of the following requirements:

(a) does not undergo any physical, chemical or biological transformation that, when deposited or with the effluxion of time, is likely to have adverse effects on the environment or human health; and

(b) includes virgin excavated natural materials such as clay, soil and rock, and other inert materials such as concrete or brick that are free of:

(i) combustible, putrescible, degradable or leachable components;

(ii) hazardous waste, hazardous substances or materials (such as municipal solid waste) likely to create leachate by means of biological breakdown;

(iii) products or materials derived from hazardous waste treatment, hazardous waste stabilisation or hazardous waste disposal practices;

(iv) materials such as medical and veterinary waste, asbestos, or radioactive substances that may present a risk to human health or the environment; and

(v) contaminated soil and other contaminated materials; and

(v) liquid waste;  and

(c) has less than two per cent by volume by load of tree or vegetable matter.

Cleanfill

Land used for the disposal of cleanfill material.

Commercial or industrial waste

Waste (excluding trade waste) that results from a commercial or industrial enterprise and includes waste generated by the carrying on of any business, factory, manufacture, process, trade, market, or other activity or operation of a similar nature.

Construction and demolition waste

Waste generated from any building work (including renovation and repair); and includes but is not limited to concrete, plasterboard, insulation, nails, wood, brick, paper, cardboard, metals, roofing materials, wool/textiles, plastic or glass, as well as any waste originating from site preparation, such as dredging materials, tree stumps, asphalt and rubble.

Council

The Kāpiti Coast District Council or any person delegated or authorised to act on its behalf.

Deposit

To cast, place, throw or drop any waste or diverted material.

Dispose or Disposal

As defined in the Act.

Diverted material

As defined in the Act.

Donation collection point

A place where approved types of waste may be deposited for the purposes of raising funds or the charitable reuse/recovery of the waste items.

Estimated value

As defined in the Building Act 2004.

Event

Any organised temporary activity of significant scale that is likely to create litter and includes (but is not limited to) an organised outdoor gathering, open-air market, parade, sporting event, protest, festival, concert or celebration. An event will be considered significant if it has an expected attendance of 1,000 or more people across the duration of the event, whether it be a single or multi-day event. For the purpose of this Bylaw ‘event’ excludes:

·      open-aired events that are enclosed within a building or structure (e.g. an open-aired stadium)

·      indoor performances, markets, displays, exhibitions or conferences

·      indoor private functions

·      indoor tasting and sampling activities

·      any regularly occurring recreational activities such as weekly sports events. 

Food waste

Waste that is derived from any item of food and is organic in origin and free of contamination and includes fruit and vegetable scraps, meat, fish, bone and shell discards, and any other similar food scraps.

Green waste

Organic plant material from gardening or arboriculture activities including lawn clippings, weeds, plants and other soft vegetable matter, which by nature or condition and being free of any contaminants will degenerate into compost.

Handled or Handles

Includes removing, collecting, transporting, storing, sorting, treating, processing or disposing of waste.

Hazardous substance

As defined in the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 and means, unless expressly provided otherwise by regulations, any substance—

(a) with 1 or more of the following intrinsic properties:

(i) explosiveness:

(ii) flammability:

(iii) a capacity to oxidise:

(iv) corrosiveness:

(v) toxicity (including chronic toxicity):

(vi) ecotoxicity, with or without bioaccumulation; or

(b) which on contact with air or water (other than air or water where the temperature or pressure has been artificially increased or decreased) generates a substance with any 1 or more of the properties specified in paragraph (a).

Hazardous waste

Waste that:

(a) contains hazardous substances at sufficient concentrations to exceed the minimum degrees of hazard specified by Hazardous Substances (Minimum Degrees of Hazard) Regulations 2000 under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996; or

(b) meets the definition for infectious substances included in the Land Transport Rule: Dangerous Goods 2005 and NZ Standard 5433: 2007  – Transport of Dangerous Goods on Land; or

(c) meets the definition for radioactive material included in the Radiation Protection Act 1965 and Regulations 1982.

Hazardous waste does not include household waste, inorganic waste, construction and demolition waste, or commercial or industrial waste.

Home composting

The activity of aerobically decaying household organic waste (green waste and/or food waste) and other compostable items originating from that property to create compost at home. To avoid doubt, includes worm farms and anaerobic digestors.

Household waste

Waste consisting of recyclable material, organic waste or residual waste originating from any residential household but does not include, commercial or industrial waste, prohibited waste, hazardous waste, trade waste, liquid waste, or construction and demolition waste.

Inorganic waste

Waste consisting of household equipment, furniture, appliances and material of a similar type that due to its nature or size cannot be collected as household waste in an approved receptacle, and that is specified by the Council as suitable for:

(a) collection from a public place by the Council or an approved waste collector; or

(b) collection from any premises by the Council or an approved waste collector; or

(c) delivery to a resource recovery facility.

Landfill

As defined in the Technical Guidelines for Disposal to Land (Waste Management Institute of New Zealand)[4] or by Government standards or regulation.

Licence

A licence, consent, permit or approval to do something under this Bylaw and includes any conditions to which the licence is subject.

Litter

Any rubbish, animal remains, glass, metal, garbage, debris, dirt, filth, rubble, ballast, stones, earth, other residual waste or any other thing of a like nature that has been disposed of in a public place, other than in an approved receptacle or collection point for such disposal, or on private land without the consent of the occupier. For the avoidance of doubt this includes organic material, dog faeces in a container or bag, or disposable nappies.

Litter receptacle

A receptacle provided for the collection of litter.

Manager

A person who controls or manages any premises, activity or event, regardless of whether that person has a proprietary interest in those premises or that activity or event. For clarity, this includes the chairperson of a body corporate for a multi-unit development.

Multi-unit development

A multiple tenancy property comprising of 10 or more separately occupied residential units, whether in the same building or in separate buildings, and held either in common ownership or in separate ownership. This includes a unit title development, a mixed-use premises with business activities, and any development with controlled or restricted access, such as a gated community.

Nuisance

As defined in section 29 of the Health Act 1956 and includes anything offensive or injurious to the health of the community or any member of it.

Occupier

In relation to any property or premises, means the inhabitant occupier of that property or premises and, in any case where any building, house, tenement, or premises is unoccupied includes the owner.

Organic waste

Food waste and/or green waste that is specified by the Council under clause 7 of this Bylaw as organic waste.

Owner

In relation to any property or premises, means the person or persons entitled to receive the rack rent of the property or premises, or who would be so entitled if the property or premises were let to a tenant at a rack rent, and where such a person is absent from New Zealand, includes their attorney or agent.

Person

An individual, a corporation sole, a body corporate, and an unincorporated body.

Premises

Any separately occupied land, dwelling, building, or part of the same.

Prohibited waste

Waste containing -

(a) any material capable of causing injury to any person or animal unless the material is sufficiently contained to prevent injury;

(b) any material capable of causing damage to the approved receptacle or likely to shatter and cause injury in the course of collection unless the material is sufficiently contained to prevent damage to the approved receptacle or to prevent injury;

(c) any material that may endanger any person, animal or vehicle which may come in to contact with it prior to, during or following collection, transportation, storage, sorting or disposal;

(d) any radioactive wastes, but excluding domestic smoke detectors;

(e) any used oil and lead-acid batteries;

(f) any hazardous waste;

(g) medical waste including wastes generated at health care facilities, such as hospitals, physicians’ offices, dental practices, blood banks, pharmacies/chemists, and veterinary hospitals/clinics, as well as medical research facilities and laboratories;

(h) any asbestos containing material; and

(i) any material identified by the Council under clause 7 of this Bylaw as posing an unacceptable risk of nuisance to the public or to public health and safety, and subject to a control made under Clause 7 below.

Public place

(a) A place that is under the control of Council or a Council-controlled organisation that, at any material time, is open to or is being used by the public, whether free or on payment of a charge; and

(b) To avoid doubt this includes any park, reserve, recreational ground, pool, community facility, sports field or facility, public open space, public garden, public square, cemetery, beach, foreshore, dune, wharf, breakwater, boat ramp, pontoon, road, street, lane, thoroughfare, footpath, access way, cycleway, bridleway, car park, grass verge, berm, and any part of the public place.

Recovery

As defined in the Act.

Recyclable material or Recyclables

The types of waste that are able to be recycled and that may be specified by the Council from time to time under this Bylaw.

Recycling

As defined in the Act.

Reuse

As defined in the Act.

Rural areas

Any areas zoned and/or defined in the [insert name] District Plan as rural.

Site

For the purposes of this Bylaw means an area of land that is the subject of an application for a building consent or an area of land where a specific development or activity is located or is proposed to be located.

Specified intended life

As defined in the Building Act 2004.

Treatment

As defined in the Act.

Unaddressed mail

Any mail or material that does not display a full address and name of a person at that address.

Waste

As defined in the Act.

Waste collector

Any person or entity that collects or transports waste and includes commercial and non-commercial collectors and transporters of waste (for example, community groups and not-for-profit organisations); but does not include individuals who collect and transport waste for personal reasons (for example, the owner taking their own household garden waste to a waste management facility).

Waste management facility

A facility authorised by the Council which primarily provides waste treatment and disposal services or waste remediation and materials recovery services, in relation to solid waste. Includes but is not limited to waste transfer stations, resource recovery stations, recycling centres, composting facilities, landfills or clean fill sites, or hazardous waste facilities.

Waste Management and Minimisation Plan or WMMP

A waste management and minimisation plan adopted by the Council under section 43 of the Act.

Waste operator

Any person or entity that operates a waste management facility.

Waste remediation and materials recovery services

The remediation and clean-up of contaminated buildings and mine sites, mine reclamation activities, removal of hazardous material and abatement of asbestos, lead paint and other toxic material.  This also includes recovery, sorting, and/or storage services in relation to waste.

Waste treatment and disposal services

The treatment or disposal of waste (including hazardous waste), including the operation of landfills, combustors, incinerators, composting, bio-digesters and other treatment facilities (except sewage treatment facilities), and waste transfer stations.

7

Controls

7.1  The Council may make, amend or revoke controls for the safe and efficient operation of waste collections services from a public place.

 

7.2  The controls made by Council under clause 7.1 may relate to the following matters:

(a)   The type, size, capacity/volume, weight, number, colour and construction of approved receptacles that may be used for the disposal, storage and collection of waste and recyclable material;

(b)   The types of household waste that may be treated for all purposes (including deposit, collection, transportation and disposal) as recyclable, organic waste, or other residual waste;

(c)   The types and categories of waste that may be deposited in approved receptacles;

(d)   The conditions applicable to any collection service from a public place, including the placement and retrieval of approved receptacles for collection, collection days and times, and restrictions on the number and weight of approved receptacles;

(e)   Requirements to ensure the correct separation of wastes into approved receptacles, including content control messaging and symbology on an approved receptacle that specifies the permitted and prohibited content;

(f)    Maximum allowable limits of a specified waste type that may be deposited, collected or transported from a public place in an approved receptacle;

(g)   Maximum allowable limits of a waste type that may be placed in a receptacle that is approved for another type of waste;

(h)   Requirements applicable to waste minimisation

(i)    Types of waste that are prohibited;

(j)    The locations, access times and conditions of use of approved collection points;

(k)   Requirements relating to the safe and secure transportation of waste;

(l)    Requirements applicable to waste service users and/or to waste handling and collection if traffic or pedestrian safety have the potential to be adversely impacted by the deposit of material in a public place or by waste servicing operations; and

(m)  Any other operational matter required for the safe and efficient operation of a waste collection service from a public place.

 

7.3  The Council must, before making, amending or revoking any control under clause 7.1, comply with the requirements under Subpart 1 of Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 .

 

7.4  Any control made, amended or revoked under clause 7.1:

(a)   Must be made by a resolution of Council that is made publicly available; and

(b)   May:

i.      Regulate, control or prohibit any matter or thing either generally, for any specified classes of case, or in a particular case;

ii.     Apply to all waste or to any specified category or type of waste;

iii.    Apply the Kāpiti Coast District or to a specified part of the Kāpiti Coast District; and/or

iv.    Apply at all times or at any specified time or period of time.

PART B: DEPOSIT, COLLECTION, TRANSPORTATION, STORAGE, PROCESSING AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE

8

General responsibilities

8.1  The occupier and/or the manager of a premises must ensure that the waste from the premises is separated into waste types as determined by the Council and is deposited for collection in the correct approved receptacle.  No person may deposit in a receptacle any material that is not approved for that type of receptacle.

 

8.2  The occupier and/or the manager of any premises must ensure that:

(a)   All waste receptacles are appropriately secured to deter scavenging and to prevent waste escaping;

(b)   Any waste receptacle is regularly emptied when it is full; and

(c)   The contents of any waste receptacle are protected from rain, dispersal by wind, or ingress or egress of flies, vermin and animals.

 

8.3  The occupier and/or the manager of any premises must ensure that:

(a)   All approved receptacles are kept in a safe location, are hygienic, in good repair, and are without any modifications or alterations to their appearance;

(b)   The contents of any approved receptacle do not seep or escape so as to be injurious or dangerous to health, cause an offensive smell or be a source of litter;

(c)   Waste is deposited in the receptacle in a manner that allows the whole of the contents to fall out easily and cleanly when the receptacle is emptied;

(d)   The receptacle is placed upright either at an approved collection point or for collection in a  position off the carriageway, in front of the premises from which the waste originated and as close to the kerbside as possible;

(e)   The receptacle is placed so that it does not disrupt or obstruct pedestrian, wheelchair or vehicular traffic, and so that access to the premises is preserved; and

(f)    The receptacle is placed for the collection of waste and is retrieved in accordance with any applicable control specified by the Council under this Bylaw.

 

8.4  No person shall deposit waste in a manner where:

(a)   The receptacle is damaged or otherwise likely to cause injury to the collector;

(b)   In the opinion of the Council, or the waste collector or waste operator where applicable, the waste is in an unsanitary or in an offensive condition;

(c)   The waste includes waste prohibited under this Bylaw;

(d)   The container/receptacle is not an approved receptacle;

(e)   The receptacle is in a condition that allows spillage of waste or is not of a sufficient size to contain the waste;

(f)    The receptacle or the waste does not comply with the rules under this Bylaw in terms of type, size, volume, weight, numbers, colour, placement or any other detail;

(g)   The number of approved receptacles placed out for collection is greater than the authorised number of receptacles for the property, unless approved by an authorised officer; or

(h)   Any other reason which the Council, or the waste collector or operator, deems would cause a health and safety concern to the waste collection operation.

 

8.5  No person shall:

(a)   Put waste into an approved receptacle allocated to any other person, without that other person’s consent; 

(b)   Remove waste from, or interfere with any waste deposited in, an approved receptacle, except the Council, a waste collector, or the person who deposited the waste; or

(c)   Remove a receptacle provided to the premises to which it has been allocated, except with the prior written approval of the Council or the waste collector.

 

8.6  The occupier and/or the manager of any premises is responsible for any waste generated on that premises until it has been collected.

 

8.7  The occupier and/or the manager of any premises is responsible for any waste not collected because of non-compliance with this Bylaw.  Any waste or recyclables not collected shall be removed from the roadside by the occupier and returned to the occupier’s premises by noon on the day following collection or within such other time period as specified by a control made under this Bylaw.

 

8.8  To enable the occupier and/or the manager of a premises to be able to comply with clauses 8.1-8.5, an authorised officer may approve placement of approved receptacles in a location other than directly outside that premises.

 

8.9  Where any breaches of the conditions in clauses 8.1-8.5 occur, the waste collector shall not be obligated to collect the waste.

 

8.10 No waste shall be transported by vehicle through, over or upon any road or public place unless such waste is sufficiently and adequately covered to prevent any of the waste from falling or otherwise escaping on to any road or other public place.

 

8.11 Any waste or diverted material deposited in or on a public place or disposed of in a manner that is in breach of this Bylaw, and/or any controls made under clause 7 of the Bylaw, shall be deemed to be litter under the Litter Act 1979 and will be subject to enforcement action under that Act.

9

Waste collections from a public place

 

 

9.1 Waste must not be placed on or in a public place for collection unless it is: 

(a)   A type of waste specified and approved by the Council as able to be placed on or in a public place for collection; and

(b)   Placed in an approved receptacle for collection by a waste collector.

 

9.2 Prohibited waste, diverted material, construction and demolition waste, or commercial or industrial waste must not be placed on or in a public place for collection unless authorised by the Council under this Bylaw or another Council Bylaw.

 

9.3 Any waste collector who collects or transports waste from a public place must:

(a)   Make available to the occupier and/or manager of a premises the appropriate approved receptacles to enable separate collection of each of the waste types required to be separately collected from the premises;

(b)   Clearly identify their name and contact details on all approved receptacles;

(c)   Not collect any household waste which has not been separated into the waste types as required under this Bylaw and/or any controls made under clause 7 this Bylaw; and

(d)   Following collection, ensure that any receptacle is placed so that it does not disrupt or obstruct pedestrian, wheelchair or vehicular traffic, and so that access to the premises is preserved.

 

9.4 Any person providing or using a waste collection service in or from a public place must comply with all controls made under this Bylaw by the Council relating to that collection.

10

Approved Collection Points

10.1 No person may deposit waste at an approved collection point other than in accordance with any applicable Council control. 

 

10.2 The Council may specify:

(a)   Any place, or receptacle in a public place or on a barge in a marine area, as an approved collection point for the collection of household waste; and

(b)   Controls relating to the deposit of waste at the collection point including the use of specified receptacles.

11

Licensing of Waste Collectors and Waste Operators

11.1 Any:

(a)   Waste collector who handles more than 20 tonnes of waste in any one twelve month period in, around or out of the [insert District/City name]; or

(b)   Waste operator with a waste management facility in the Kāpiti Coast District that handles more than 20 tonnes of waste in any one twelve month period;

must have a current licence that has been issued by the Council and may not collect waste or operate a waste management facility (as the case may be) without such a licence.

 

11.2  An application for a licence must be made on the approved form available from the Council, and must be accompanied by the application fee and the supporting information required by the Council to process the application.

 

11.3  The holder of an existing licence may apply to the Council for a renewal of that licence. 

 

11.4  A licence is personal to the holder and is not transferable. 

 

11.5  A licence may be granted or refused at the discretion of the Council, and if granted, may be on such terms and conditions as the Council considers fit.

 

11.6  When considering a licence application, the Council may take into account a range of factors including but not limited to the following:

(a)   The nature of the activity for which a licence is sought;

(b)   The extent to which the licensed activities will promote public health and safety, and support achievement of the Council’s WMMP, including the waste minimisation goals and initiatives within that plan;

(c)   The extent to which the licensed activities will adopt best practice waste management and minimisation;

(d)   The quantity and type of waste to be handled;

(e)   The methods employed for the handling, disposing and recycling of the waste and the minimisation of litter, including (but not limited to):

i.      the identity of the waste management facility at which it is proposed that recycling, recovery, sorting, storage, treatment, or disposal will occur; and

ii.     adherence to health and safety standards and any other relevant industry standards;

(f)    The frequency and location of the waste collection, removal, storage and transportation services;

(g)   The applicant’s experience, reputation, and track record in the waste and diverted material industry, including any known past operational issues which may affect the applicant’s performance, and any breaches of previous licence conditions; and

(h)   The terms and conditions under which any disposal of waste is permitted and the existence of, or need for, any statutory approvals, authorisations, or consents required to be held or complied with in respect of such disposal. 

 

11.7  When considering an application for a licence, the Council may inspect the premises or locations related to the application in relation to the purposes for which the licence is sought.

 

11.8  A licensed waste collector or waste operator must comply with all terms and conditions of the licence.  The terms and conditions may include, but are not limited to, the following matters:

(a)   Term – a licence may be granted for a term of up to five years from the date of Council approval, or for a shorter duration if specified in the terms and conditions of the licence, and will be reviewed every year by the Council to ensure compliance with the terms and conditions of the licence;

(b)   Licence fee – the licensee must pay an annual licence fee in the amount determined by the Council;

(c)   Performance bond – the Council may require a licence holder to post a bank-guaranteed bond or a security;

(d)   Compliance – the licence holder must comply with any relevant controls, standards or policies the Council has set for waste handling such as (but not limited to):

i.      Provision of waste collection services within reasonable collection times and to meet any minimum collection frequencies specified by Council;

ii.     Provision of appropriate approved receptacles for waste collection which clearly identify the waste collector’s name and contact details; and

iii.    The collection of any litter within a specified distance of an approved receptacle awaiting collection and any litter spillage from the licence holder’s vehicle during the collection, transportation, storage or disposal process.

(e)   Provision of information – the licence holder must provide data relating to all waste they have handled to the Council during the term of their licence, in the form and at the times determined by the Council (but not limited to):

i.      The quantities of various waste types that have been handled by the waste collector or waste operator during a specified period of time, including the source and destination of each waste type and the method of processing (recycling, recovery, treatment, disposal etc); and

ii.     Weighbridge receipts, gate records of waste tonnages per waste type as specified in the licence. 

The minimum requirement will be an annual performance report due within one month of the completion of each year of the licence.

 

11.9   The Council may suspend or revoke a licence if the licence holder fails to comply with this Bylaw, any of the terms or conditions of the licence, any relevant controls made under this Bylaw, or acts in a manner which the Council considers, on reasonable grounds and in light of the purpose of this Bylaw, is not suitable for the holder of a licence.

 

11.10  Fees and charges for the issue of licences under this Bylaw are set out in Council’s Schedule of Fees and Charges and may be amended from time to time in accordance with section 150 of the Local Government Act 2002.

12

Multi-Unit Developments -

 

 

 

 

Waste management plans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waste collection, transportation, storage and deposit controls

12.1 The owner and/or the manager of a multi-unit development must make adequate provision for the management of all waste and recycling generated within the premises. This includes arrangements for the regular collection of waste to the satisfaction of Council and the provision of adequate areas for:

(a)   The storage of disposed of or discarded material on the premises from any activity on that premises; and

(b)   The collection of disposed of or discarded material if collection occurs on the premises.

 

12.2 Subject to any exemption granted in accordance with clause 12.5, the owner and/or the manager of a multi-unit development must submit to the Council for approval a multi-unit development waste management plan for:

(a)   The management of an existing multi-unit development if any of the occupiers cannot dispose of or discard material as expressly allowed in clause 8, within three months of the date that the owner and/or manager is notified by the Council of the requirement to obtain approval of a multi-unit development waste management plan; or

(b)   A planned multi-unit development, prior to the commencement of construction of the multi-unit development.

 

12.3 A multi-unit development waste management plan must include, but is not limited to, the following information:

(a)   The person or persons responsible for the management, collection and disposal of waste and the methods to be used;

(b)   Identification of an adequate area on the premises for the storage of receptacles that is readily accessible to the occupiers of units and the waste collector to enable separate collection and transportation of waste and recycling as specified by the Council;

(c)   An estimate of the types and volumes of waste that will be generated;

(d)   How waste generated within the premises is to be minimised and the steps to maximise the collection and use of recyclables and reusable material;

(e)   The methods to be used to minimise noise and odour and to keep the area hygienic, free from vermin or other infestations, and protected from theft and vandalism;

(f)    Identification of the means and route of access and egress to the waste storage area; and

(g)   Any other matter relating to waste management and minimisation that may be specified by the Council.

 

12.4 Any person who owns, manages or occupies a multi-unit development must comply with the approved multi-unit development waste management plan for that development and any conditions applied to the approval by the Council (except if an exemption is granted in accordance with clause 12.5).

 

12.5 The Council may, on application, grant a written exemption from compliance with all or any the requirements of this clause 12 if:

(a)   In the opinion of the Council, the costs of full compliance would be disproportionate to any resulting waste management and minimisation benefits; and/or

(b)   The owner and/or the manager demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Council that recyclable material, organic waste and other wastes are separately and regularly collected.

 

12.6 The Council may specify further controls for the following matters in relation to the collection, transportation, storage or deposit of waste from multi-unit developments:

(a)   The categories of recyclable material, organic waste and other residual waste that may be deposited at or collected from a multi-unit development;

(b)   The times, locations and conditions applicable to any collection service from a multi-unit development, including the placement and retrieval of receptacles for collection, collection times and restrictions on the number and weight of approved receptacles;

(c)   Requirements to ensure the correct separation of organic waste, recyclable materials and other residual waste into approved receptacles; and

(d)   Any other operational matter required for the safe and efficient operation of a collection service from a multi-unit development.

 

12.7 Any person who owns or manages a multi-unit development or owns or occupies a unit in a multi-unit development must comply with any controls for the deposit, collection, transportation, storage and management of waste in the multi-unit development made by the Council under clause 7 of this Bylaw.

 

13

Events

13.1 At least 10 working days prior to the commencement of an event, the event manager must submit to the Council for approval an event waste management plan for the event.

 

13.2 The event waste management plan must set out:

(a)   An estimate of the types and amounts of waste to be generated by the event;

(b)   How waste generated by the event is to be minimised;

(c)   The steps that will be taken to maximise the collection and use of recyclables and other recoverable, reusable or compostable materials, and an estimate of the diversion of waste;

(d)   The equipment to be provided for the storage, collection and transportation of waste and diverted material;

(e)   The proposed method for minimising and capturing litter associated with the event;

(f)    The person responsible for the collection and disposal of waste and the methods to be used;

(g)   The timing and frequency of the collection of waste, during or after the event; and

(h)   Any other matters relating to event waste management and minimisation that may be specified by the Council. 

13.3 The manager of an event must comply with the event waste management plan approved by the Council for the event.

 

13.4 On completion of the event, if requested by the Council, the event manager must provide the Council with a waste analysis report, which at a minimum, will include a breakdown of:

·      The types of waste generated by the event;

·      The amounts of waste (by type) generated by the event;

·      The amount of waste diverted; and

·      The waste management facilities used to recover, recycle, treat or dispose of this waste.

[ link to the regional event guidelines and any other useful materials/aids for people preparing waste management plans to assist event organisers/managers to be inlcuded]

14

Construction Site and Demolition Waste

14.1 The Council may make a control under this Bylaw to require any person that is applying for a building consent for building work of a certain estimated value or higher to submit a construction site and demolition waste management plan to the Council for approval prior to the commencement of any building work

 

14.2 At a minimum, a construction site and demolition waste management plan must set out:

(a)   The name of the client, principal contractor, and person who prepared the waste management plan;

(b)   The location of the site;

(c)   The estimated total cost of the building work;

(d)   A description of all types of waste expected to be produced;

(e)   The proposed method of waste management for each type of waste (e.g. reuse, recovery, recycling, disposal); and

(f)    The proposed method for minimising and capturing litter associated with the project and the building work.

 

14.3 A construction site and demolition waste management plan may also be required by Council to set out:

(a)   An estimate of the quantity of each type of waste; and

(b)   An estimate of the diversion of waste.

 

14.4 While the building work is being carried out, the principal contractor may be required by Council to:

(a)   Review the construction site and demolition waste management plan as necessary;

(b)   Record quantities and types of waste produced; and

(c)   Record the types and quantities of waste that have been:

i.      Reused (on or off site);

ii.     Recycled (on or off site);

iii.    Sent to other forms of recovery (on or off site);

iv.    Sent to landfill;

v.     Sent to cleanfill; or

vi.    Otherwise disposed of. 

 

14.5 Within three months of completion of the building work the Council may require the principal contractor to add to the construction site and demolition waste management plan:

(a)   Confirmation that the plan has been monitored and updated;

(b)  A comparison of estimated quantities of each type of waste generated against the actual quantities of each waste type;

(c)   An explanation of any deviation from the plan; and

(d)  An estimate of any cost savings that have been achieved by completing and implementing the plan. 

 

14.6 Where a construction site and demolition waste management plan is required, the principal contractor must ensure that a copy of the construction site and demolition waste management plan is kept on site, and that every contractor knows where it can be found. It must be available to any contractor carrying out any work described in the plan. 

[to be included when the control is set by Council; link to any useful information and material/aids to assist people preparing waste management plans e.g. free templates and support available from agencies such as BRANZ and the Green Building Council]

15

Inorganic waste

 

15.1 The Council may specify controls for the following matters in relation to the collection of inorganic waste from a public place:

(a)   the weight, size and nature of inorganic waste that may be deposited for collection;

(b)   the categories of inorganic waste that may be deposited for collection;

(c)   the times, locations and conditions applicable to the collection of inorganic waste from a public place;

(d)   the collection methods that cause health and safety risks;

(e)   any other operational matters required for the safe and efficient collection of inorganic waste from a public place.

 

15.2 Any person who deposits inorganic waste for collection on, or collects and transports inorganic waste from, a public place must comply with any controls made by the Council under this Bylaw.

16

Nuisance and litter

16.1 No person may:

(a) allow any accumulation of waste or diverted material on any premises they own, occupy or manage to become offensive, a nuisance or likely to be injurious to health; or

(b) use an approved receptacle in a manner that creates a nuisance, is offensive or is likely to be injurious to health.

 

16.2 Except as provided for under this Bylaw, no person may:

(a) bury or allow to be buried any waste on any property they own, occupy or manage except:

i. organic waste, including dead farm animals in rural areas;

ii. dead companion animals and nuisance pests; or

iii. for the purposes of home composting;

iv. waste deposited in a farm refuse dump or an offal pit that is consented or complies with the permitted activity conditions of the Wellington Region Natural Resources Plan;

(b) dispose of any waste on any premises except at –

i. a waste management facility, or

ii. any premises they own, occupy or manage, for the purposes of home composting.

 

16.3 No person may:

(a) deposit any waste arising from that person’s household or that person’s business activities in any litter receptacle provided by the Council in any public place;

(b) remove any waste from any litter receptacle provided by the Council in any public place, where this results in any waste being deposited outside the litter receptacle, unless authorised by the Council to do so;

(c) deposit or attempt to deposit any litter in any litter receptacle provided by the Council in any public place if:

i. the receptacle is full; or

ii. the litter is likely to escape;

(d) fix or attach any flag, banner, bunting, balloon, sign, poster, leaflet or similar thing to any litter receptacle provided by the Council in any public place; or

(e) damage any litter receptacle provided by the Council in any public place.

 

16.4 The owner, occupier or manager of any premises on which any flag, banner, bunting, balloon, sign, poster, leaflet or similar device is displayed that is likely to become litter, must take all steps to the satisfaction of the Council to prevent it becoming litter and to clean it up in the event that it does become litter.

17

Unaddressed mail and advertising material

17.1 No person may deposit, cause, permit or authorise the deposit of any unaddressed mail or advertising material:

(a) in any letterbox which is clearly marked "no circulars", "no junk mail", "addressed mail only" or with words of similar effect, or around or near any such letterbox or associated vehicle accessway;

(b) on any vehicle parked in a public place; or

(c) in a letterbox that is already full of mail and/or advertising materials.

 

17.2 Clause 17.1(a) does not apply to:

(a) material or public notices from any government department or agency, crown entity, local authority, or material from a network utility relating to the maintenance, repair, servicing or administration of that network utility;

(b) communications or fund raising material from local community organisations, charities or charitable institutions;

(c)  material from a political party, political candidate or elected member; or

(d) a community newspaper or newsletter, unless the letterbox is clearly marked “no community newspapers” or with words of similar effect.

 

17.3 Any unaddressed mail or advertising mail deposited in a manner in breach of clauses 17.1 and 17.2 shall be deemed to be litter under the Litter Act 1979.

national code of practice for distribution of unaddressed mail

18

Donation Collection Points

18.1 Anyone intending to establish a donation collection point in or on a public place must notify the Council in advance and must operate the donation collection point in compliance with any requirements the Council specifies including but not limited to:

(a) location;

(b) vehicle access;

(c) type of waste which may be deposited; and

(d) use of approved receptacles.

 

18.2 All donation collection points must ensure:

(a) the removal of deposited material from the collection point;

(b) the clean-up of any litter or illegal dumping; and

(c) the clean-up or removal of any graffiti.

PART 3: OTHER MATTERS

19

General Offences and Penalties

19.1 Any person who fails to comply with this Bylaw and the decisions and controls made under this Bylaw commits an offence under section 239 of the Local Government Act 2002 and is liable to a fine as specified in section 242(4) of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

19.2 A person who commits a breach of this Bylaw that is an offence under the Litter Act 1979, the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 or the Health Act 1956 is liable to a penalty (without limitation) under those Acts, as relevant.

20

Other Enforcement Powers -

 

Non-compliance with licence terms and conditions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-compliance with general responsibilities and waste collection requirements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-compliance with approved collection point requirements

 

 

Non-compliance with waste management plan requirements

 

Non-compliance with inorganic material requirements

 

 

Non-compliance with unaddressed mail requirements

20.1 Any control that is made or amended by Council under clause 7.1 shall be enforceable under this Bylaw.

 

20.2 Where a licence holder does not comply with the requirements of this Bylaw and/or the terms and conditions of a licence, the Council may take one or more of the following steps:

(a)   Issue a written warning to the licence holder, which may be treated as evidence of a prior breach of a licence condition during any subsequent review of the licence;

(b)   Review the licence, which may result in:

i.      amendment of the licence; or

ii.     suspension of the licence; or

iii.    withdrawal of the licence.

(c)   Have recourse to any performance bond or security where the Council has incurred any cost as a result of the breach of the licence condition, including where the Council has itself performed or arranged for the performance of any licensed activity on the default of the licence holder;

(d)   Review the amount and nature of the performance bond or security, which may result in:

i.      an increase of the amount of the performance bond or security;

ii.     a change to the nature of the security that has been provided.

(e)   Enforce any offence that may have been committed under the Litter Act 1979; and

(f)    Enforce any breach of this Bylaw, as provided for in the Health Act 1956, the Local Government Act 2002 and the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

20.3 Where a person does not comply with the requirements of this Bylaw and/or any controls made under the Bylaw in relation to the waste and diverted materials collection service that applies to them, the Council (or a licensed waste collector where applicable) may take the following action(s) against the person:

(a)   Reject (i.e. not collect) the contents of any approved receptacle left out by that person for collection from a public place, if the contents or placement of the receptacle is non-compliant;

(b)   Remove the contents of any approved receptacle left out for collection from a public place where the contents or placement of the receptacle is non-compliant, subject to payment of the costs of removal, administrative costs and an additional penalty equivalent to the amount payable for the collection of the largest available size of approved receptacle from that premises;

(c)   Withdraw or suspend the collection service being provided to that person;

(d)   Enforce any offence that may have been committed under the Litter Act 1979; and/or

(e)   Enforce any breach of this Bylaw, as provided for in the Health Act 1956, the Local Government Act 2002 and the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

20.4 Where action has been taken against a person under clause 20.3(c), the Council can authorise the reinstatement of the collection service once it is satisfied on reasonable grounds that the Bylaw will be complied with.

 

20.5 Where a person does not comply with a control made by the Council under clause 10 of this Bylaw the Council may:

(a)   Suspend that person's use of any service provided by the Council at any or every waste collection service;

(b)   Enforce any offence that may have been committed under the Litter Act 1979; or

(c)   Enforce any breach of this Bylaw, as provided for in the Health Act 1956, the Local Government Act 2002 and the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

20.6 Where a person does not comply with any of the requirements in clauses 12 (Multi-Unit Developments), 13 (Events) or 14 (Construction Site and Demolition Waste Management Plans) and/or any controls made under the Bylaw, the Council may take one or more of the following steps:

(a)   Enforce any offence that may have been committed under the Litter Act 1979; and/or

(b)   Enforce any breach of this Bylaw, as provided for in the Health Act 1956, the Local Government Act 2002 and the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

20.7 Where a person does not comply with a control made by the Council under clause 15 of this Bylaw, the Council (or a licensed waste collector or waste operator where applicable) may:

(a)   Reject (i.e. not collect) the inorganic material, if the inorganic material or placement is non-compliant;

(b)   Remove the inorganic material, where the inorganic material or placement is non-compliant, subject to payment of the costs of removal, administrative costs and an additional penalty specified by the council;

(c)   Enforce any offence that may have been committed under the Litter Act 1979; and/or

(d)   Enforce any breach of this bylaw, as provided for in the Health Act 1956, the Local Government Act 2002 and the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

20.8 Where a person does not comply with any of the requirements in clause 17 of this Bylaw, the Council may use its enforcement powers under the Litter Act 1979.

21

Exceptions and Saving Provisions

21.1 A person is not in breach of this Bylaw if that person proves that the act or omission was in compliance with the directions of an Authorised Officer.

21.2 A product stewardship scheme accredited under the Act may be exempt from the requirements of this Bylaw. 

22

Fees

22.1 The Council may in accordance with the provisions of section 150 of the Local Government Act 2002 set prescribed fees under this Bylaw.

22.2 The Council may refund, remit or waive any fee prescribed by this Bylaw or charge payable for an authority, approval, licence, permit or consent from, or inspection by, the Council, for any reason it thinks fit.

23

Forms and processes

23.1 The Council may prescribe the form of, and process to be followed for, any application, approval, licence, or other document, which is required under this Bylaw (or any related controls made by Council). These forms and processes may be altered or amended at any time.

 


 

SCHEDULE 1 PROPOSED CONTROLS TO THE KAPITI COUNCIL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND MINIMISATION BYLAW 2020

In accordance with clause 7.1 of the Kāpiti District Council Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020, the Council resolves the following controls in relation to solid waste management, collection and disposal.

1      INTRODUCTION AND COMMENCEMENT

1.1  These are Council resolutions made pursuant to clause 7.1 of the Kāpiti Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020 (“the Bylaw”) and should be read and conjunction with it.

These resolutions come into force on 1 January 2021

CONTROLS

Waste collection Services (applicable to any privately or Council provided collection service)

1.2  Approved receptacles for the collection of household waste (including recycling and organic waste) are:

a)    Wheeliebins for waste

b)    Wheeliebins for mixed recycling excluding glass

c)    Crates for glass recycling

d)    Crates for mixed recycling including glass

e)    Wheeliebins for organic waste

1.3  The types of and categories of waste that can be deposited in receptacles for household waste:

a)    Wheeliebins for waste: residual waste originating from a household which may not include prohibited waste, hazardous waste, trade waste, liquid waste or construction and demolition waste

b)    Wheeliebins for mixed recycling excluding glass: plastics numbered 1, 2 and 5 (without lids), cardboard, paper, aluminium and steel cans. Glass cannot be deposited in these wheeliebins but must be deposited in the separately provided crate.

c)    Crates for glass recycling: glass bottles and jars (without lids) only

d)    Crates for mixed recycling including glass: plastics numbered 1,2 and 5 (without lids), cardboard, paper, aluminium and steel cans, glass bottles and jars

1.4  The permitted times for waste, recycling or other diverted material collection services, whether the service is provided by private waste collectors or Council (clause 7.2 (d)) are as follows:
 

a)    For residential areas within the Kapiti Coast District collection services are permitted 6 days of the week (Monday – Saturday) between the hours of 7am to 6pm.

b)    For business activity areas (retail, commercial and industrial) located within specific centres and zones within the District, collection services are permitted 6 days a week (Monday to Saturday) between the hours of 6.00am and 9.00pm.

c)    The Council may approve a variation to collection times for reasons of health, safety or congestion. Requests must be made to the Authorised Officer under this Bylaw (General Manager Infrastructure Services). Prior to the consideration of the request, all affected parties must be notified by the Authorised Officer and given the opportunity to have their views considered by the Council as part of the decision making process. If a variation to collection times is approved, the collection service provider must notify all affected customers in writing of the times for when waste and diverted material must be put out.

 

1.5  Where the operation of a waste, recycling or other diverted material collection service can be carried out entirely on private property, the permitted times are as follows:

a)    For all areas within the Kapiti Coast District on any day at any time except for between the hours of 10.00pm and 6.00am, unless the conditions of a current resource consent for the property or an activity on the property provide otherwise

1.6  The emptying of Council provided litter receptacles located in public places may occur on any day and at any time.

 

Storage of Waste

1.7  Waste, recycling or other diverted material must not be stored in or on a public place unless specifically approved by the Kāpiti Coast District Council.

Placement and Retrieval of Waste and Waste Receptacles

1.8  Waste, recycling or other diverted material may only be placed in or on a public place for collection pursuant to the Bylaw or the controls made under the Bylaw unless otherwise approved by the Kāpiti Coast District Council.

 

1.9  Approved receptacles must be placed in an appropriate location in or on a public place[5] for the collection of waste, recycling or other diverted material during the following permitted times:

a)    Receptacles may be placed for collection from 12 noon on the day preceding collection, and must be placed for collection before 7.00am on the day of collection or by the latest time as notified by a private collection service provider.

b)    All receptacles and any uncollected waste, recycling or other diverted material must be removed from the public place by 12 noon on the day following collection day unless the collector has sent out notification that collections were delayed and will now be carried out on that following day. In that case a) applies.

1.10    Other diverted materials or inorganic waste for which a collection day has been agreed and confirmed between the occupier/owner of a premises/property and an approved collector, must in principle be collected from the private property that the waste originates from.  If collection from private property is not possible, these materials must be placed in an appropriate location in or on a public place. Controls 1.8, 1.9, 1.4 and 1.5 apply to these collections.

1.11   Any type of uncollected waste, recycling or diverted material including approved receptacles and waste outside of an approved receptacle, intentionally or otherwise, remain the property and responsibility of the depositor and will be considered litter under the Litter Act 1979 if not removed from the public place and will be subject to enforcement action under that Act.


Prohibited materials

1.12   No person shall deposit or cause or allow any of the following materials to be deposited in any approved waste receptacle placed for collection:

a)    Explosives, highly inflammable or infectious material, hot ashes

b)    Liquids, acids, printer’s ink, paint or any other viscous fluid;

c)    Any pesticides, herbicides, fungicides or other toxic compounds or any containers that have been used to hold such materials;

d)    Any ashes, broken bottles, glass or glass particles, broken crockery, broken china, razor blades, syringes, knives or any other object or material capable by reason of its shape or sharpness of causing injury unless such waste is properly and sufficiently wrapped/contained so as to prevent injury to waste collectors, damage or loss; or

e)    Hazardous waste as defined in clause 6 of the Bylaw; or

f)     Any other prohibited waste as identified in clause 6 of the Bylaw.

 

1.13    No person shall deposit or cause or allow any of the following materials to be deposited in any approved recycling receptacle place for collection:

a)    Any broken glass or bottles

b)    Any type of waste that is not recyclable material that can be placed in recycling receptacles for collection as set out under control 1.3.

 

 

 

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

8.3         Report on the Independent Organisational Review

Author:                    Ian Clements, Finance Team

Authoriser:             Wayne Maxwell, Chief Executive

 

Purpose of Report

1        The purpose of this report is for the Council to formally receive the Martin Jenkins Independent Organisational Review.

Delegation

2        The Council has the authority to consider this matter.

Background

Establishing the Subcommittee and confirming Terms of Reference

3        At its meeting on the 27 June 2019, the Council approved the commencement of an Independent Organisational Review (the Review) to include the following in its scope:

a)      internal culture of the staff organisation, including staff satisfaction and turnover;

b)      relationship and interface between governance and the staff organisation;

c)      relationships with key stakeholders and the interface between the staff organisation and ratepayers;

d)      the effective delivery of the Open for Business programme; and

e)      the capacity and capability of the staff organisation to deliver the Council’s objectives in a cost effective and efficient manner.

4        At the same meeting, the Council further agreed to the immediate establishment of the Independent Organisational Review Subcommittee (the Subcommittee) to oversee the review process including the appointment of the independent reviewer for approval by Council.

5        The Subcommittee initially comprised the Mayor[6], Chief Executive or alternate and three councillors - Cr James Cootes, Cr John Howson and Cr Janet Holborow. Council’s three iwi partners were represented by an ART Confederation representative – Mahina-a-rangi Baker.

6        The key responsibilities of the Subcommittee were to:

a)      develop the Terms of Reference for the independent review;

b)      to oversee the procurement process;

c)      make recommendations on the selection and appointment of the entity / organisation contracted to deliver the review;

d)      report regularly to the Council on the progress of the Review.

7        It was intended that the Review be completed in time to report to the last Council meeting of the 2016-19 triennium on 26 September 2019, or earlier if possible.

8        The Subcommittee met several times in July and August, mainly in the first instance to oversee the development of the Terms of Reference for the Review, with the assistance of an independently appointed Terms of Reference Advisor. The Terms of Reference for the Review were agreed at the Council meeting on 29 August.

9        There was no specific process to appoint the Terms of Reference Advisor. The Subcommittee considered a number of options, and identified John Maasen (Barrister, Barristers.Comm) who agreed to assist.

Funding the Review

10      Because the Subcommittee had no delegated financial authority from the Council and because the organisational review was initiated after the adoption of the 2019/20 Annual Plan, there was no allocated budget for the external Review costs.

11      At the Council’s direction, Council Officers were tasked with identifying 2019/20 Annual Plan budgets that could be reassigned to help fund the total estimated costs of the Review.

12      The financial impacts of this are discussed in the Financial considerations section of the report.

Overseeing the procurement process

13      The Subcommittee was responsible for overseeing the procurement process, which it did with the assistance of the Council’s Procurement Specialist, including the appointment of a probity advisor to ensure that a robust procurement process was followed. Audit NZ was selected as the probity advisor

14      A RFP was advertised on the Government Electronic Tender Service and after the proposals were evaluated a shortlist of three was drawn up and those shortlisted were invited to present their proposals to the Subcommittee.

15      External consultants MartinJenkins, were selected by the Subcommittee as the preferred supplier for recommendation to the Council. At the Council meeting on 10 October, the Council approved the appointment of MartinJenkins.

16      Audit New Zealand provided an assurance report to confirm that they were satisfied that the procurement had been conducted in accordance with recognised good practice and with due regard to probity.

Review delivery

17      The Review was expected to commence on the 14 October 2019 and take three months to complete. MartinJenkins reported directly to the new Mayor, until such time as alternate arrangements could be made by the new Council following the 2019 elections. As the Subcommittee ceased with effect from the 10 October 2019, and no moves were made to extend its tenure, MartinJenkins continued to report directly to the Mayor.

18      The Review progressed from its start date in October and was developed through the input of a significant number of current and former staff and elected members, and the community, as well as the provision of substantial Council documentation.

19      Originally MartinJenkins was expected to report back early in 2020. The Review was taking a little longer than first anticipated to complete due to the number of people that came forward for interview and some scheduling issues created by the Christmas / New Year break. In early 2020, MartinJenkins indicated that they expected to present their report to Council at the end of April. 

20      In April 2020, as part of its COVID-19 response the Council stated that it was focussing on supporting the Kāpiti Coast community response and planning for recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 public health restrictions. Accordingly, MartinJenkins was instructed to not deliver their final report at the end of April, as previously intended. The report was to be requested by the Council, when it was ready to receive it. 

21      Following adverse publicity in relation to the delayed release of the review, at a Council meeting on 14 May some Elected Members notified the Chair of a Matter of an urgent nature.  The urgent matter proposed a process directing MartinJenkins to release its final report within 30 days. The proposal also included details on which parties would receive the report and when, a requirement for the recipients of the report to be briefed, and the provision for a press release by Elected Members.

22      Because this matter was raised on the evening of 13 May, there was no opportunity for a staff report to be provided, nor for advice to be provided, to Elected Members. The proposal was approved by the Council.

23      However, and as more fully described in the officer’s report to Council on 11 June, after receiving legal advice it was determined that in order to ensure natural justice and adherence to the Council’s good employer obligations, the process around the release of the report be revised, as shown below:

23.1   15 June 2020 - report released to Simpson Grierson;

23.2   19 June 2020 - key findings briefing by MartinJenkins and report released to the Mayor, Councillors and Chief Executive;

23.3   23 June 2020 – detailed briefing by MartinJenkins to the Mayor, Councillors, Community Board Chairs, a representative of each of the Council’s iwi partner organisations and the Chief Executive;

23.4   29 June 2020 - report released to the public.

24      The process which ended up with the delivery of the Independent Organisational Review was unlike most other Council reports which are usually delivered by officers to the Council. The Review was led by the Elected Members and the final report effectively delivered to the Chief Executive, to receive on behalf of the organisation.

DISCUSSION

25      The purpose of this report is to enable the Council to formally receive the MartinJenkins Review. The Review has been received by Elected Members and staff, and it has been released to the public. Press releases were made by the Mayor and Councillors, and by the Chief Executive.

26      MartinJenkins is an independent and well-regarded consultancy which has delivered a balanced, constructive and future-focussed report. The report makes a point of acknowledging all the things that the Council does well, and especially it acknowledges that the Council has committed, hard-working staff who are doing their best for their community. The report also highlights some areas where there are opportunities for improvement.

27      The review contained 29 specific recommendations, grouped together under a number of themes. A lot of the recommendations reinforce findings that the Council has already made, and in many cases work is already underway to address these findings.

28      Over the next few weeks, officers will consider the Review’s findings before providing a formal response to the Mayor and Councillors, which is planned to be at the Council meeting in August.

Scope

29      There were three key aims of the Review in the approved Terms of Reference, as set out below:

29.1   To obtain accurate information through targeted and insightful interaction with people within and outside KCDC to elicit feedback concerning the efficacy and preparedness of KCDC to perform its statutory obligations and its capability and capacity to implement the planned work streams in the Long Term Plan and Annual Plan and to achieve the long term interests of the community including through effective and responsive decision-making by KCDC (EM)

29.2   Concerning Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi Partnership, the aim is to confirm that mana whenua and KCDC have a living partnership which is exercised at all levels of their respective organisations.

29.3   The Reviewer needs to assess from the information gathering exercise matters that create significant risks to optimal performance by KCDC.

30      The aims of the Review can be considered to have been achieved to a reasonable extent. With regard to the first point – evidently MartinJenkins has consulted widely and received a range of views, as well as sighting a considerable number of Council plans and organisational documents. MartinJenkins noted many instances of strong Council performance, but also balanced this with its recommendations to improve Council performance.

31      The second aim sought to confirm that a living relationship existed at all levels between mana whenua and the Council. MartinJenkins has examined Council’s relationship with mana whenua quite closely, and has the relationship as one of its Review themes, including four associated recommendations for improvement, the first of which states the need for perceived and actual working together in partnership, below the mayoral level.

32      The Review provides quite a lot of guidance on what good practice risk management looks like. And there is some discussion of risk around the Council’s communications and its use of outsourcing. There is also some reported feedback that the Council sometimes has a risk averse approach.

Council response to review recommendations

33      Council officers have begun framing the responses to the 29 recommendations, in terms of what has already been done to address them, what is currently being done and what can be done in the future. These responses are planned to be presented to the Council at its meeting at the end of August.

34      Officers will report back to the Council on a regular basis, to provide an update on the implementation of planned activities and an assessment of how effective they are in addressing the recommendations.

Considerations

Policy considerations

35      There are no policy considerations at this time, however once a detailed action plan has been agreed in response to the 29 recommendations, there might be a need for new or amended policies. 

Legal considerations

36      Legal advice has been sought wherever appropriate throughout the Review process. There are no further legal considerations at this time.

Financial considerations

Organisational review costs

37      As noted previously, the Subcommittee had no delegated financial authority and there was no approved funding in the 2019/20 Annual Plan budget. Therefore, officers needed to identify available funding from existing 2019/20 budgets that could be reassigned to help fund the total estimated costs of the Review. A total reassigned budget of $233,000 was established in the 2019/20 year to pay for the Review.

38      Now that the Review has been completed, the total review costs have been confirmed at $237,347. The breakdown of costs is as shown in the table below:


 

Procurement Adviser

$33,564

Manu Whenua Representative

$4,068

Probity Adviser

$14,545

Terms of Reference Advisor

$15,098

Independent Review Costs (Martin Jenkins)

$158,930

Legal Counsel

$9,021

Room Hire, Catering, Advertising

$2,121

Total costs

$237,347

Organisational Review response costs

39      The 2020/21 Annual Plan was adopted on 25 June and, as was the case with the Organisational Review costs, no provision has been made in the Annual Plan to fund any unbudgeted activities that may arise from the Council’s proposed responses to the 29 recommendations.

40      Potential cost implications and associated funding options will form part of the August report and subsequent reporting.

Tāngata whenua considerations

41      Council’s three iwi partners were represented on the sub-committee that developed the terms of reference for the review by an ART Confederation representative. The Terms of Reference included exploration of matters relating to the partnership between the Council and iwi and, one of the key themes encompassing 4 of the 29 recommendations was on how the Council could strengthen the partnership relationship with mana whenua.

Strategic considerations

42      When the Council has confirmed its responses to the 29 recommendations, it will be in a better position to outline how the Review contributes to one or more of Council’s ten-year outcomes.

43      At this point in time it seems likely that the Review will help to maintain or improve the Community’s satisfaction with Council services.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

44      This report is for the receipt of the Organisational Review and as such has a low level of significance under the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Consultation already undertaken

45      MartinJenkins consulted with current and former Elected Members and staff, Community Board members, representatives from two of the three iwi in the District and representatives from external organisations, community groups and residents’ organisations.

Engagement planning

46      An engagement plan is not needed to implement this decision.  

Publicity

47      There may be public interest in this report and Elected Members and the Chief Executive may wish to consider issuing a statement.

 

Recommendations

48      That the Council formally receives the MartinJenkins Independent Organisational Review and notes the contents of the report, including the 29 recommendations.

49      That the Council notes that officers are developing a response to the 29 recommendations and plan to report back to the Council at its next meeting on 27 August.

 

Appendices

Nil

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

8.4         Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23

Author:                    Leanna Hill, Senior Economic Development Advisor

Authoriser:             James Jefferson, Group Manager Place and Space

 

Purpose of Report

1.   This report seeks Council’s approval of the Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23 following the receipt and review of public feedback.

2.   The report also seeks Council’s approval to appoint an Independent Chair to the Economic Development Kotahitanga Board.

Delegation

3.   Council has the authority to make this decision.

Background

4.   The Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy 2015-2018 was approved by the Environment and Community Development Committee in December 2014. In late 2018, a decision was made to refresh the current Economic Development Strategy. The refresh process commenced with a series of partner and stakeholder workshops to understand key concerns and issues with the current strategy and economic development activity in the district.

5.   To support the refresh of the Economic Development Strategy, a drafting group was established and comprised the following membership:

·    Councillor Angela Buswell, representing Council

·    Heather Hutching, representing Kāpiti Chamber of Commerce

·    Jenna-Lea Phillpott, initially representing Kāpiti Economic Development Agency, later independent representative.

·    Liz Koh, representing Kāpiti Economic Development Agency (member since May 2019)

6.   An extensive engagement programme commenced including stakeholder and pillar workshops with Iwi, partners, stakeholders and industry groups; along with attendance at business group meetings, community board meetings and advisory group meetings. In addition, individual meetings were also held with businesses and members of the community. Workshop updates were provided to Council and Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti Committee during the refresh.

7.   On 25 June 2020, Council approved the draft Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23 (draft strategy) for public feedback.

Issues and Options

·         Public Feedback process

8.   On 26 June 2020 (following Council approval), a media release was sent out advising that public feedback on the draft strategy was now being requested. Timelines for the feedback process were agreed with the drafting group members.

9.   In addition to the media release there were also posts on the Council’s Facebook page, an item in the Everything Kāpiti Newsletter and a notice on the front page of the Council’s website. A dedicated webpage was also prepared that provided access to the draft strategy, as well as information about the draft strategy.

·        

·          

10. A video was also prepared with the members of the drafting group discussing the draft strategy, its purpose and seeking public feedback on it. This was posted on Facebook, YouTube, the Council’s website.

11. The following table shows the level of some of the online interactions that occurred throughout the public feedback phase:

·         Table 1: Online interactions

·         Audience

·         Facebook Post 26 June

·         Reached 3789 people, 246 engagements (clicks into video)

·         Facebook Post 30 June

·         1597 people reached, 75 engagements

·          

12. In order to support the feedback process, a short survey was prepared. The survey sought feedback on:

·    The focus on Partnership and Well-being;

·    The actions under each pillar;

·    Support for independent governance, and

·    Any other comments.

13. A series of Information / Drop in sessions were held during the feedback period. The purpose of these sessions was to provide the community with the opportunity to ask questions about the draft strategy and to provide direct feedback. Table 2 shows the information / drop in sessions held during the feedback period:

·         Table 2: Information / Drop in Sessions

·         Paraparaumu Community Centre

·         1 July 2020 - Morning

·         Otaki Town Centre

·         2 July 2020 - Evening

·         Paraparaumu Community Centre

·         7 July 2020 - Morning

·         Paraparaumu Community Centre

·         7 July 2020 - Evening

·          

14. In addition to the information / drop in sessions, the following meetings were arranged to seek feedback on the strategy, these are outlined in Table 3 below:

·         Table 3: Individual Feedback Meetings

·         Ōtaki Community Board Chair

·         7 July 2020

·         Waikanae Community Board Chair

·         14 July 2020

·         Paraparaumu / Raumati Community Board Chair

·         9 July 2020

·         Paekākāriki Community Board Chair

·         16 July 2020

·         Kāpiti Disabilities Advisory Group Representative

·         13 July 2020

·         Youth Council

·         20 July 2020

·         Grey Power Chair

·         14 July 2020

·          

15. In total, twelve people completed the online survey and thirteen written submissions were received. Seven people attending the Information / Drop in sessions. The level of response is likely to be an indication of the high level of engagement that has previously occurred with partners and stakeholders during the development of the draft strategy.

16. A paper on the draft strategy was presented at the Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti Committee meeting on 30 June 2020. The paper sought endorsement of the draft strategy from the committee, which was passed with the following decision:

·        

·         Further engagement will occur with the Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti Committee in relation to the currently separate Māori Economic Development and Well-being Plan and if a separate plan is required going forward. This is in relation to the references to paragraphs 5 and 24 in the resolution.

·         Insights received from the survey and submissions

17. The following tables provide a summary of the survey feedback received on the drafted Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-2023. Copies of the survey questions and responses can be found in the appendix to this paper.

Table 4: Survey Question

Synopsis of the 12 survey responses:

Q1

Overall, respondents supported the partnership and wellbeing approach

Q2

Mixed feedback on actions - some support actions, some comments about actions being vague and needing measures, Pillar – Positioning Kāpiti should be removed.

Q3

Nine respondents support Independent Governance approach, Three respondents against.

Q4

Mixed response – Key themes were in relation to Independent Governance approach and removal of ED activities from Council.

·          

18. The following table provides a summary of the submissions made to the drafted Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-2023. Copies of the submissions can be found in the appendix to this paper:

Grey Power

·      Overall supportive. Governance Board should lead development and there be performance measures.

·      Older Persons to be involved in Workforce Plan

·      Link the Gvmt’s support for apprenticeships to reduce NEET.

·      Want the dependency ratio removed (appendix 2)

Alison Lash - Waikanae

·      Member of Kāpiti Climate Change Action Group

·      Thinks EDS is well thought out and supports framework and working in partnership.

·      Climate Change Emergency – what are we doing? What we have noted in EDS is too woolly.

·      Improve the resilience of our economy and environment to climate change impacts and transitioning to low-carbon future.

·      Process around attracting major events and business that sees the meeting of criteria to be carbon-free, environmental practices etc

·      Greater detail around the setting up the Governance Board, process for selecting members, how it will work – deliver to the strategy, accountability etc

Monique Leith – Kāpiti Accessibility Advisory Group

·      Supports the strategy and its’ focus and actions.

·      Unacceptable that we do not include people with disabilities – wants to see it reflected in the strategy before it is finalised.

Dawn Brook - Waikanae

·      Member of Kāpiti Climate Change Action Group and Low Carbon Kāpiti

·      Governance Board ToR should include climate responsibilities that are performance measured and reported.

·      The strategy should develop/attract business and commerce that makes a positive contribution to addressing climate issues.

Raumati Village Association – Bede Laracy

 

·      Supports the broad framework of the drafted strategy.

·      Lack of focus on existing business – need to show the existing business is important to our economy.

·      More explicit support for retail industry

Dr Joy Anderton - Ōtaki

·      Maintaining and enhancing natural capital – protecting fertile land for food growing, water.

·      Incentives for turning conventional farms back to regenerative agriculture.

·      Education – gardening and organics

·      Working collaboratively to address climate change, Kāpiti own it.

Rachel Barwell – Raumati South

·      Has no argument with the drafted strategy

·      Areas of concern: Governance, this is the role of elected members not for an independent body

·      Protection of food producing land and our water

·      Restoration of our natural capital

Linda Hill – Raumati South

·      No – to independent board – this is the elected members’ responsibility not non-elected.

·      Table 1 should link to the more comprehensive table 6 to be meaningful

·      Made note of Pillar headings in Te Reo – however these headings were provided by iwi.

·      Use ‘Doughnut economics’ great visual tool for rate payers

·      Promoting the use of public transport for events

·      Support Kāpiti for day trippers, look at supporting WRC and other groups with tree planting days and wetland restoration projects etc

·      Metlink - Station at Poplar Ave for Queen Elizabeth Park visitors weekends only and another special stop at Southward Car Museum for events.

Paul Turner - Landlink

·      Reporting on success measures – not there

·      No tie to LTP – how is this shown?

·      Understand Kāpiti’s competitive advantages

·      Consider the Wellington Major Urban Centre

·      Incentivising instead of language “support, attract, advocate”

·      Analysing and reporting crucial to measuring success

·      We support focus on partnerships and wellbeing.

·      What does quality growth look like?

·      Concrete actions that are measurable

·      A key growth enabler – digital transformation plan

·      Development enabler role in Council – Open for Opportunity

·      Support an independent Governance Board – questions what ‘teeth’ it will have when it comes to accountability

ORGANICFARMNZ – SOUTHWEST, North Island

·      Supports the strategy in principle

·      Concerned the rural enviro – hort and organic production, climate change has been overlooked along with the education and training.

·      Need to protect or food producing soils. Kāpiti is known for fresh food, beverages, condiments etc as well as a healthy environment

·      Representation for the enviro, ag and hort, Organics is needed on Governance Board

·      Organic Food Farm and forest Tour – could be a council funded event.

Guy Burns – Paraparaumu/Raumati Community Board

·      Reduce regulation and compliance costs and simplify procedures.

Jill Griggs – Waikanae Community Board

·      Importance of Kāpiti Story

·      Want to see professional, science and technology and construction sector broken down more to make it more relatable to growth and opportunities etc

·      Would like to see a KCDC policy to support the opportunity to engage retirees into mentoring, business skills support etc for businesses or young people.

·      How do we measure success?

Chris Evans

·      Supermarkets are big players and are at the heart of domestic economic expenditure – have a huge role to play

·      Transport coordination (outside of local bus routes). Late night bus shuttles on set routes (hospitality)

·      Senior citizens have role to play in understanding youths needs and aspirations

·      Education system involving apprenticeships

·      A self-build housing project

·      Combine Grey Power knowledge with training needs

·      Kāpiti branding – for marketing purposes in CBD and regional packages

·      Heaps more freedom parks and toilets etc

·          

19. Based on the feedback received and discussions held, a number of amendments have been made to the strategy. The final draft strategy is attached as an appendix to this paper. Key themes / changes made in the document include:

·    Environment / Climate Change – There has been a strengthening of the discussion, aims and actions within the document about Climate Change and inclusion of the development of a Climate Change Strategy.

·    People with disabilities – Based on feedback received and discussion, actions in the draft strategy have been adjusted and the Kāpiti Disabilities Advisory Group has been included as a partner in applicable actions.

·    Older persons – Adjustments have been made to actions in the draft strategy and partners updated.

·    Supporting existing businesses – Discussion and actions have been adjusted to ensure that it is clearer and that there is a focus on supporting and retaining existing businesses.

·    Rural Economy – Opportunities for further growth in the rural economy, including food production, equestrian and others activities will be worked on as part of the Supporting Key Sectors Pou. There will include opportunities as part of the Destination Plan development and the Kapiti Story. It has been identified in the strategy as an area of opportunity however further work is required.

20. The majority of survey and submission feedback in relation to the independent Governance Board is supportive of its establishment. There were a small number of survey responses and submissions received against the proposal, however given the strong partner and stakeholder support and the majority of support from the public feedback establishment of the Board is recommended.

21. There has been feedback on measures in the draft strategy and that these are not currently formalised. As outlined in the draft strategy, current economic measures and benchmarks have been significantly impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. We have received forecasts on the potential economic impacts, however these are still changing and we don’t yet have a clear understanding of what the economic situation will look like over the short to medium term.

22. As part of the establishment of the independent Governance Board a Terms of Reference and Performance Agreement will be developed. As part of the Performance Agreement, measures will be agreed with Council for monitoring purposes. Measures will consist of a mixture of economic measures, as well as outcomes and delivery against proposed actions.

23. Not all of the feedback was able to be actioned on or reflected in the draft strategy as it either relates to the implementation of actions in the draft strategy or other Council Strategies / Plans that are to either be developed or updated, such as the Long Term Plan. Where appropriate this feedback will be passed on to other parts of Council or considered as part of the implementation of actions in the draft strategy.

·         Economic Development Kotahitanga Board

24. A priority action in the draft strategy is the establishment of an independent Governance Board the Economic Development Kotahitanga Board. This action is under the Kotahitanga / Strengthening Partnerships and Leadership Pou in the strategy and was an area of significant feedback and discussion during the refresh.

25. Independent governance of economic development activities in the district had previously been approved by Council in July 2016, with Council approving a transitional approach from Council led to Community led and then the establishment of an Independent Entity. This is illustrated in the diagram below:

·           

26. The previous governance approaches have not remained in place over the long term. It is important that this does not occur again and that the governance board is supported in order to build momentum and create trust with partners, stakeholders and the community.

27. An Independently led, Council supported approach directed by Council is proposed to enable the Economic Development Kotahitanga Board (the Board) to get established and to support the implementation of the priority actions. Following the establishment of the Board, Council will then need to work with the Board on further options. Support for the Board would include secretariat support, as well as support from the Economic Development Team within Council and would be finalised as part of the Terms of Reference and Performance Agreement. 

28. Based on feedback received, the following structure is proposed for the Board:

·        

29. The proposed structure for the Board has been updated to reflect feedback received from the Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti Committee (TWoK) members about Iwi representation on the board. TWoK advised that one Iwi representative is unable to represent all three Iwi and did not reflect the partnership between Iwi and Council. The proposed board structure now includes representation for all three Iwi.

30. In order to enable the effective establishment of the Board to commence, it is proposed that a direct appointment is made by Council to the role of Independent Chair. During the development of the draft strategy, Neil MacKay has been recommended by a number of partners and stakeholders for this role, including the Kapiti Chamber of Commerce and Kāpiti Economic Development Agency. Neil has been a stakeholder in the development of the strategy and is very aware of the importance of the next steps in this process and the establishment of a well-functioning governance board. Neil has also been taking a lead role in assisting with the coordination of the Districts recovery planning. Neil has a background in governance roles in both the private and public sector, including governance roles with Electra and Venture Taranaki. It is proposed that the appointment is for a 12-month term initially.

31. The appointment of the Independent Chair would assist with progressing the development of the Terms of Reference and a Performance Agreement. It would also assist with progressing the appointment of the other independent board members and working with Iwi to appointment representatives.

32. Significant feedback received from Partners and Stakeholder was about having trust in the implementation and delivery of the strategy.  It is therefore vital that the Board is quickly able to build trust and credibility and develop key relationships locally and outside the district. Based on the feedback received it is proposed that the initial core responsibilities for the Board in the Terms of Reference include:

·   overseeing the implementation of the strategy,

·   advocating for the district and economic activities in the district and

·   being a relationship broker, with a focus on establishing and strengthening strategic relationships to progress the strategy’s key priorities and opportunities.

33. In order to progress the establishment of the Board and ensure that there is a clear understanding of the process. It is recommended that a joint paper from the Independent Chair and Council officers is presented to the Strategy and Operations Committee covering the following:

·    Appointment process for Independent Board members and Iwi Representatives

·    Appointment of Elected Representative as ex-officio member of the Board

·    Terms of Reference for the Board

·    Performance Agreement between the Board and Council, including confirmation of support to be provided by Council to the Board

·          

Considerations

Policy considerations

34. There are no policy considerations at this stage of the strategy.

Legal considerations

35. There are no legal considerations at this stage.

Financial considerations

36. The implementation of the Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23 in year one will be funded from the existing Economic Development budget. This will require reprioritisation of the existing budget allocations to ensure alignment with the final agreed actions identified in the strategy.

37. Further activities / projects arising from these and other actions in year two and three will need to be considered as part of the Long Term Plan process.

Tāngata whenua considerations

38. In addition to the existing Kāpiti Economic Development Strategy there is also a separate Strategy for Māori Economic Development and Wellbeing which was adopted in July 2013. The purpose of the strategy is to set out how Council will support Māori Economic Development and Well-being in Kāpiti. As part of this process, discussions were held with iwi representatives about a combined strategy moving forward which has generally been well supported by representatives.

39. During the development of the strategy there have been briefings with Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti. In addition to these briefings, individual workshops were offered with representatives of all three Iwi, with sessions held with a representative of Ngāti Toa Rangatira and Te Āti Awa ki Whakarongotai.

40. Partnership has been a core principal through the development of the draft strategy and this is also correct in the delivery of the strategy. In order to support this partnership and following feedback from members of Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti, representation is proposed for all three Iwi on the governance board for the strategy; Economic Development Kotahitanga Board.

41. On 30 June 2020, the Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti Committee endorsed the draft strategy with follow up discussion to be held regarding the requirement for the refresh of a separate Māori Economic Development and Well-being Strategy.

Strategic considerations

42. The Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23 has been developed in line with the 2018-38 Long Term Plan, with a focus on contributing to the development of a vibrant Kāpiti Coast economy.

Significance and Engagement

Significance policy

43. This matter has a low degree of significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

·         Communications and Engagement

44. Subject to approval by Council, the strategy will be forwarded to a designer for development into a completed document. It is proposed that a short and long form version of the strategy is developed, with an accompanying one-page document to also be completed.

Recommendations

 

45. That the Council approves the final version of the Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-2023 and authorises the Chief Executive to sign off the final strategy once final design is completed.

46. That the Council approves the appointment of Neil MacKay for a 12-month term as the Independent Chair of the Economic Development Kotahitanga Board, with a joint paper to be presented to the Strategy and Operations Committee covering the following:

·    Appointment process for Independent Board members and Iwi Representatives

·    Appointment of Elected Representative as ex-officio member of the Board

·    Terms of Reference for the Board

·    Performance Agreement between the Board and Council, including confirmation of support to be provided by Council to the Board

 

 

Appendices

1.       Kapiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-23 - final

2.       Survey Responses

3.       Submissions

4.       Neil MacKay Summary CV  

 


Council Meeting Agenda

30 July 2020

 

KĀpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-2023

 

 

23 July 2020

 

 

 

 


contents


Foreword  1

Executive Summary  3

Introduction   11

Our Economy and community  15

Strategic Framework  21

Implementation and Delivery  Error! Bookmark not defined.

Governance and Accountability  33

 

Appendix 1 : Our Economy  36

Appendix 2 : Definitions  48

 

tables

Table 1:      Positioning the Kāpiti Coast – Key Actions  27

Table 2:      Open for Opportunity – Key Actions  28

Table 3:      Growing Skills and Capability – Key Actions  29

Table 4:      Strengthening Partnerships and Leadership – Key Actions  30

Table 5:      Supporting Key Sectors – Key Actions  32

Table 6:      Year 1 – Priority Key Actions  34

 

figures

Figure 1:     Our Strategic Pillars and Focus  6

Figure 2:     Our Foundations for Success  12

Figure 3:     Geography of the Kāpiti Coast 15

Figure 4:     Population forecasts Kāpiti Coast 2013-2043  16

Figure 5:     Ngā Pou  22

Figure 6:     Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy – Strategic Framework  24

Figure 8:     Proportion of GDP 2019  36

Figure 9:     Wellington Region Creative Industries Employment 39

Figure 10:   Domestic and International tourism expenditure 2019  41

Figure 11:   Tourism spending growth 2010-2019  41

Figure 12:   Age demographics Kāpiti Coast District compared to New Zealand 2019  42

Figure 13:   Unemployment rate, annual average 2018 and 2019  44

Figure 14:   Percentage of school leavers with NCEA Level 2 or above 2018  44

Figure 15:   Percentage of Māori school leavers with NCEA Level 2 or above 2018  45

Figure 16:   Percentage of Māori school leavers with NCEA Level 2 or above 2009-2018  45

Figure 17:   Consumer spending 2016 - 2019  46

Figure 18:   Rental affordability index 2000-2019  47

 

 



he wāhinga kōrero                  Foreword


Nō mātou te maringa nui kia whakaputa atu tēnei mahere rautaki, mahere whakamahinga. He mea whakawhanake tēnei nā ngā iwi o te kotahitanga ki te tonga (ART), ngā hunga whaipānga me te hāpori whānui. He kaupapa tāwharau tēnei i te koke whakamua o te ōhanga puta noa i te hāpori o Kapiti. He hononga tōna ki te mahere pae tawhiti (‘Long Term Plan’) o te Kaunihera o Kapiti, kia kotahi mai ngā hāpori katoa o te rohe.

Mā te Poari Whakawhanake Ōhanga Kotahitanga (Economic Development Kotahitanga Board) e whakahaere te rautaki nei. Mā te mahi tahi e tautoko ai i te whakamahinga me te tutukinga o ngā whainga matua. Me rite ka tika nā te nui o ngā wero, ngā piki me ngā heke, hei tautoko i tō tātou ōhanga me te hāpori mai i ngā wero pēnei i te Mate Urutā (COVID19), aha atu, aha atu.

Ko te anga whakamua o te mahere rautaki nei hei whakakotahi mai i te rohe whānui o Kapiti me ngā tari kāwana. Hei tūāpapa mō te oranga tonutanga mō te hāpori whānui mai Paekākāriki ki Ōtaki, mai i ngā maunga ki te moana.

Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am pleased to present the Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-2023. The Strategy has been developed, and will be delivered, in partnership with iwi, key partners, stakeholders, and the community. The Strategy has been formed with the overarching priority of enhancing the economic wellbeing for all on the Kāpiti Coast. Our district is alive with opportunity and the vision and outcomes of this strategy align to our Long Term Plan, and focus on ‘building a stronger Kāpiti Coast together’.

The implementation of this strategy will be overseen by an Economic Development Kotahitanga Board. This will be a collaborative governance model; it will not only support the delivery of our priority actions but help ensure we can react to economic opportunities and impacts, such as the Covid19 pandemic. We need to be able to adapt to these challenges and ensure that all participants in our economy are supported.

The next three years will see important and significant changes, including the opening of major new transport infrastructure. This will increase the attractiveness of the district to visitors, new residents, and businesses. As a community we need to ensure that we can take advantage of this investment while protecting our natural environment and understanding adaption requirements for climate change.

The approach outlined in the Strategy demonstrates the importance of partnership and working together as a district along with other regional and central government agencies to deliver on our proposed actions. These provide firm foundations, enhancing our district and the economic well-being of residents from Paekākāriki to Ōtaki, from the beachfront to the hillside. We will tread carefully but deliberately, which means taking specific, incremental steps that give us increased choices in the future.          Mayor K Gurunathan


Executive Summary


Introduction

As a district, the Kāpiti Coast is primed for growth - significant new infrastructure is nearing completion, our population is growing, and our attractiveness to the business and investment community increases. Opportunities for local partners to work together and for the district to work more closely and strategically with our neighbouring regions are being realised. These collaborations are necessary to ensure better economic outcomes and more inclusive growth.

This Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan (the Strategy) provides a framework for growing the Kāpiti Coast’s economy for the benefit of current and future residents, iwi, communities and businesses. The Strategy covers the period 2020–2023 and replaces the previous Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy 2015-2018. The Strategy has been developed in kotahitanga / partnership and will be delivered through kotahitanga / partnership. This will be fundamental to our success and building strong foundations and community well-being over the next three years.

Right now a shared economic and well-being concern is the Covid-19 pandemic and how this will impact our businesses and communities. The virus has already affected many parts of our economy, and it is expected that further impacts will emerge over time. A separate recovery plan is being prepared for the district and this will be guided by our longer-term aspirations, as well as the immediate impacts in our community.

 

Wider strategic context

In developing this Strategy, we have also considered the wider strategic context and the need for strong cooperation and commitment at a national and regional level. This will be important to ensure effective implementation and delivery and we will continue to pursue opportunities associated with Central Government and other sources funding, which can provide much needed investment in the district as we continue to grow.

The Strategy’s objectives and actions also recognise the importance of delivering inclusive and sustainable growth. Kāpiti Coast has declared a climate change emergency and we are committed to enhancing the well-being of all our residents and communities, while protecting our natural environment and adapting to protect our future environment.

Areas of opportunity

There are significant opportunities to further grow and develop the Kāpiti Coast economy, including:

·       increasing the awareness of the Kāpiti Coast as a great place to live, visit and do business; highlighting our quality of life, improved infrastructure, rich culture, natural environment and resilience in order to attract more residents, businesses and investment, and increase visitor spend and guest nights.

·       enabling increased higher paying local job opportunities in our communities, creating more employment and training pathways for our young people / rangatahi including those not in education, employment, or training (NEET), people with disabilities and; facilitating opportunities for industry to connect to the skills, talent and expertise of older people and in the district.

·       highlighting our key sectors and environment, including what we have to offer in terms of manufacturing and service based industries, creative industries, productive lands and niche & artisan producers, attractions and parks, and working with iwi to unlock opportunities for Māori-owned land and businesses.

·       supporting and encouraging more businesses to start up and establish in the district. Kāpiti already has a high percentage of self-employed residents, 27.9% compared to 16.2% nationally and the opportunity exists to support further growth of these existing businesses, as well as helping new businesses establish and feel welcome.

Areas for improvement

1.                 There are also areas we need to improve, including:

·       continuing to develop and make the case for additional efficient, sustainable, and resilient transport infrastructure across all of the Kāpiti Coast and improving our connectivity to other centres.

·       developing, attracting, and retaining a skilled and competitive workforce, based on an understanding of current and future workforce needs, addressing skills gaps and shortages and facilitating greater connections between businesses, education and training providers and our communities.

·       improving community well-being including providing pathways to higher income jobs and enabling local career progression, supporting our young people / rangātahi and people with disabilities with sustainable pathways to employment and further training and encouraging entrepreneurship and innovation. Ensuring older people in our community have the opportunity to contribute their skills and experience in a way that recognises the unique contribution that they can bring as we continue to grow and adapt.

·       placing greater focus on growing and supporting our partnerships with iwi, business and the community and providing strong leadership and transparency, strengthening communication between groups and building trust.

·       support for key sectors and having a better understanding of their potential for growth and how best to facilitate and support this in partnership with the sector.


Ngā Moemoea / Our vision

As a community we have developed a strategic vision, Ngā Moemoea, that is at the heart of this strategy and highlights the importance of partnership in our approach and inclusive growth for all members in our community.

Through partnership, support the growth of a vibrant, diverse Kāpiti Coast economy that provides increased opportunity, resilience, and well-being for all.

To achieve this vision, our partners, businesses, and communities have told us that we need to work together to:

·       Celebrate and protect our rich culture, natural environment and identity while highlighting the opportunities and advantages of the Kāpiti Coast through retaining and attracting businesses and residents and; attract domestic and international visitors to the district.

·       Adopt a business-friendly focus that enables all participants in the economy to operate to their full potential and contribute to a vibrant economy while protecting our natural environment.

·       Enable innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship by continuing to build connections and networks with local talent and supporting sustainable pathways for our current and future employment requirements, with increased Māori employment pathways and business initiatives.

·       Strengthen partnerships and leadership, providing increased opportunity for quality local entrepreneurship, growth and collaboration, while celebrating, protecting, and strengthening our unique and distinctive community.

·       Focus our efforts to grow those industries and sectors that provide the most potential for the Kāpiti Coast economy and our community.

 

 


 

 

 


 

Our strategic pillars

The above vision and priorities shape the five pillars, Ngā Pou, of this strategy, which are illustrated below in Figure 1.

Figure 1     Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy – Strategic Framework

Ngā Moemoea / Vision

Through partnership, support the growth of a vibrant, diverse Kāpiti Coast economy

that provides increased opportunity, resilience, and well-being for all

Ngā Pou / Pillar

WHAKAPAPA / Positioning the Kāpiti Coast

KAITIAKITANGA /

Open for opportunity 

WHĀNAU /

Growing skills and capability

KOTAHITANGA / Strengthening partnerships and Leadership

MANAAKITANGA /

Supporting key sectors

Ngā Whāinga / Aim

Celebrate our rich culture, natural environment and identity and; highlight the opportunities and advantages of the Kāpiti Coast

Facilitate quality growth that protects and enhances the District and its natural environment

Enable employment, innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship and improve capacity for mana whenua participation

Delivery and implementation through strengthened partnerships and leadership and recognises the significant relationship with iwi as mana whenua

Grow industries and sectors that provide the most potential for supporting improved economic well-being  

Ngā Mahi / Actions

Develop and deliver the Kāpiti Coast Story

Facilitate and support major events

 

 

Ensure a welcoming and customer focused approach to council services

Have a coordinated approach to the facilitation of key opportunities

Ensure effective regulations and policies that support growth and protect our environment, including the District Plan

Retain and attract businesses and agencies to the Kāpiti Coast

 

Develop a Workforce Plan including Youth Initiatives and opportunities for Māori, older people and people with disabilities.

Facilitate growth of international education

Advocate for local tertiary and apprenticeship linkages

Enhance business networking and training opportunities

Develop a business investment and support matching programme

Establish an Economic Development Kotahitanga Board and finalise the monitoring and reporting framework for the Strategy

Support the development and delivery of an integrated Covid 19 recovery plan

Support actions that enable mana whenua aspirations

Advocate for new and improved essential infrastructure including electrification of rail to Ōtaki

Support unique economic opportunities in our communities

Advocate for increased access to affordable housing to support the growth and retention of local residents

 

Identify opportunities and barriers experienced by key sectors, including high growth sectors

Develop a district-wide Destination Plan to support the growth of the visitor economy, including strengthened air linkages and supporting infrastructure such as the Kāpiti Gateway.

Support the development and delivery of a Kāpiti Creative Industries Plan

Facilitate and support the development of a Climate Change Strategy.

Support development of industry led groups

Ngā whakaputa nga takawaenga / Medium term outcomes

 

Increased awareness of the Kāpiti Coast as a destination

Increase in number of attendees at major events delivered

 

Businesses recognise Kāpiti Coast as a great place to exist, establish and grow

Key industries and businesses feel supported

More businesses and organisations actively considering the Kāpiti Coast

Improved match between workforce needs and skills available

Increase in employment and training pathways for young people, people with disabilities and Māori

Increased business networking and awareness of training and support

 

Increased business engagement

Increased advocacy for Kāpiti Coast

Increase in Government investment into district

Targeted actions to support growth of key industries

Growth of visitor economy

Improved resilience, climate change awareness and education across key industries and businesses 

Industry led business groups established

 

Ngā whakaputa nga roroa / Longer term outcomes

 

Increase in visitor numbers and expenditure

Increase in new businesses and residents locating in district

 

Growth of key industries and businesses

Economic impacts and opportunities of key projects understood and realised

 Establishment and growth of existing and new businesses and government offices in Kāpiti Coast (combined 200+ FTE)

Increase level of qualification attainment

Decrease in proportion of young people/rangatahi not in education, employment or training (NEET)

Decreased rates of unemployment

Increase in investment into key industries and businesses

Increased infrastructure investment in Kāpiti Coast

Manu whenua aspirations realised

 

Growth of key industries and businesses

Reduction in emissions and increased climate resilience

Sustainable multi-sector partnership and collaboration

Impacts

Employment Growth – increase in local employment options and pathways

Mean Income Growth – increase in higher paying local employment and income generating  opportunities

Business Unit Growth – increase in businesses establishing, expanding and moving to the district

GDP Growth – increased growth of the local economy and key sectors.


Governance and delivery

2.                 The ongoing arrangements for governance and delivery of this strategy are as important as the proposed actions. This governance needs to be consistent, continuous, and effective.

3.                 Recognising this, it is agreed that:

·       the Economic Development Kotahitanga Board is established

·       an independent chair is appointed by Council to build trust, form a strong Board and provide a unified strategic direction

·       the Board will be selected based on capability and Board members need to be able to work productively with multiple partners and stakeholders within and outside the district

·       a council representative will be an ex-officio member of the Board

·       local iwi will each be represented on the Board

·       council will provide support to the Board

·       a separate Terms of Reference Agreement will be developed and agreed with Council and the Board Chair

·       A performance agreement with measures will be developed and agreed with Council and the Board

4.                 It is proposed that the initial core responsibilities of the Board would focus on overseeing the Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan. They would advocate for Kāpiti Coast and for economic development activities in the district. The Board would act as a relationship broker, with a focus on the establishment of strategic relationships to progress the outlined key priorities of this Strategy. The Board will also play an important role in finalising and agreeing the monitoring and reporting framework for the Strategy. This recognises that, given the Covid-19 pandemic, there is a need to understand more fully the economic impacts on the local economy and how these will affect our economic performance and growth.

Priorities for year 1

5.                 The implementation plan contains a significant number of actions that will be progressed by the Board, Council and its key partners over the coming years. In year 1 our priorities are to:

·       Deliver the Kāpiti Story – which supports our positioning the Kāpiti Coast pillar.

·       Provide a coordinated approach to the facilitation of key opportunities, such as the attraction of new businesses and government agencies. – which supports our open for opportunity pillar.

·       Develop a Kāpiti Coast Workforce Plan– which supports our growing skills and capability pillar.

·       Establish an Economic Development Kotahitanga Board and support the development and delivery of an integrated Covid 19 Recovery Plan – which supports our strengthening partnerships and leadership pillar and recognises the significant relationship with iwi as mana whenua.

·       Develop a Kāpiti Coast Destination Plan, which includes a focus on increasing opportunities for Māori business and a strategy for one other key sector – which supports our supporting key sectors pillar.

Finalise the monitoring and reporting framework and performance agreement and measures for the Economic Development Strategy - which will be agreed with the Board after the Covid 19 impacts are better understood.


6.                  

Introduction


Purpose of this strategy

The purpose of the Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan 2020-2023 (the Strategy) is to provide a framework for growing and developing the Kāpiti Coast’s economy for the benefit of current and future residents, iwi, community, and business.

The objectives, actions and priorities proposed in the Strategy are based upon:

·       engagement and discussion with iwi, other partners, and wider stakeholders to understand their perspectives and priorities for the future of the Kāpiti Coast’s economy

·       an understanding of the strategic and policy context, at a local, regional, and national level, and consideration of what these mean for the Kāpiti Coast

·       analysis of the Kāpiti Coast’s economy and well-being, as well as an initial understanding of the impact of the current Covid-19 pandemic.

The Kāpiti Coast is primed for growth, with significant new infrastructure being developed, and amenities such as the Te Raukura ki Kāpiti (Kāpiti Coast Performing Arts Centre), recently completed. Our district has a lot to offer to new residents, businesses and visitors and the district provides significant opportunity to support the growth of a more resilient Wellington region.

Like all districts, there are issues and challenges that must be addressed. While our infrastructure is improving, there is a need to plan for the future and to consider what else is required to make our existing industries and communities more attractive and resilient.  To continue to support quality growth we need to better understand these opportunities. A failure to do so could adversely impact our future potential.

We need to understand our key sectors, and emerging opportunities, to strategically plan to enable sustainable growth. We need to support our existing business and enable new businesses to grow. We also need to attract more visitors, talent, and investment. We need to nurture entrepreneurship and innovation and grow the skills and capability of our industries. Critically, we also need to support our rangatahi/young people into sustainable pathways to employment and leadership, particularly those not currently in Employment, Education or Training (NEET).

Our district, like others across the region and nationally, faces the unprecedented challenge of responding to and recovering from the Covid-19 pandemic. Understanding the ongoing and longer-term impacts of the pandemic will be a priority for our businesses and community alike. This will take the form of a recovery plan which will sit alongside this Strategy.

Despite the immediate impacts and uncertainties created by Covid-19, over the longer term, the Kāpiti Coast’s economy is well positioned to grow and prosper. There are opportunities for partners to work together and for the district to work more closely and strategically with our neighbouring regions. This collaboration will enable better economic outcomes and more inclusive growth, benefiting our residents, communities, and businesses.

These issues set the context for this Strategy, which replaces our 2015-2018 Economic Development Strategy and provides the framework for the development of the Kāpiti Coast economy. A strong inclusive economy means more opportunity and greater well-being for all and allows individuals, whanau, and communities the freedom to pursue their own prosperity.

In this Strategy, we set out an implementation plan with clear actions that have been developed with iwi, other partners, wider stakeholders, and the community. These actions will be delivered through partnership. This partnership will be fundamental to our success and to building strong foundations with our communities across each of the wellbeing’s over the next three years (Figure 1).

Figure 1:    Our Foundations for Success

7.                

 

Wider strategic context

In developing the strategy, consideration was given to the wider strategic context for the district, which reinforces the requirement for strong cooperation and commitment at a national and regional level. The Wellington Regional Strategy (WRS), developed in 2007 and refreshed in 2012, sets out a regional approach to support economic development and focuses on six areas:

·       commercialisation of innovation

·       investment mechanisms for growth

·       building world-class infrastructure

·       retain and attract business, investment, and talent to the region

·       education and workforce development to service regional economy needs

·       being open for business.

The Wellington Regional Economic Development Agency, WellingtonNZ, is tasked with progressing these areas and are committed to supporting the implementation of this Strategy. Alongside the WRS, the Wellington Regional Investment Plan and the Wellington Regional Growth Framework (currently being prepared) have been developed in response to the government’s request to have a joined up approach on key issues such as housing, transport and supporting the growth of business support in the region. The Wellington Regional Growth Framework will provide a 30 to 100-year spatial plan for the region; alignment with these will be important if we are to ensure the best possible partnership with central government as a region, including the Horowhenua District.

WellingtonNZ has recently completed the development of a Wellington Regional Workforce Plan and the government is developing a National Workforce Leadership Group. To ensure that we can best leverage these initiatives, we will be developing a Workforce Plan for the Kāpiti Coast as one of the key priority actions of this Strategy.

Greater Wellington Regional Council’s Māori Economic Development Plan is also under development and is planned to be launched in 2020. Council has discussed with iwi the continuation of a separate Māori Economic Development Plan for the Kāpiti Coast or to be a partner to this Strategy, or both. Iwi have indicated that being a partner in this Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan was their preferred choice and provided the best opportunity for a joined-up approach to realising the potential of our current and future economy.

At a national level, we have seen a concerted focus since early 2018 on unlocking productivity potential in the regions under the government’s Provincial Growth Fund (PGF). Kāpiti Coast was announced as being eligible for the PGF in 2018 and the fund has already supported projects in the district. More applications are being progressed and this opportunity is likely to evolve as government responds to Covid-19.

The government’s focus on well-being brings an inclusive growth focus to issues facing the country such as the housing shortage and climate change. Well-being is crucial to sustainable long term economic development and is a priority for the development and delivery of our strategy. 

In May 2019, the Kapiti Coast District Council declared a climate emergency as recognition of the increased impact now and in the future of coastal erosion, flooding and other climate change impacts effecting our communities. It is important that all parts of our community, including business become more aware of the impacts of climate change and sea level rise and to take part in developing solutions and pathways for adapting to coming change.

As a coastal district, our community is facing significant environmental challenges as the result of our changing climate and rising sea levels which will erode our coastline over time. While we don’t know how significant these changes will be and how quickly they will happen, we do know that communities that plan for change, and work together, are more resilient in the face of that change. Council is facilitating the development of a Climate Change Strategy which will include a review of economic challenges and opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

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8.                  

·      


Introducing this strategy

The following sections of this strategy and implementation plan set out:

·       an overview of the Kāpiti Coast’s economy and community, together with an assessment of the key opportunities and challenges facing the district

·       a strategic framework for the strategy which sets out our vision and identifies our key strategic pillars, Ngā Pou, and associated actions

·       a detailed implementation plan, which identifies the priority actions, lead agencies, key partners, and delivery timelines

·       our arrangements for governance, monitoring and accountability.

Appendix 1 provides a more detailed assessment of the Kāpiti Coast economy and Appendix 2 provides definitions of key terms contained in the strategy and implementation plan.



Our Economy and community


People and place

We are a diverse, proud community - We are the Kāpiti Coast.

9.                 The Kāpiti Coast District extends from Paekākāriki on the southern border through to Ōtaki, and includes Kāpiti Island / Ko te Waewae Kapiti o Tara Raua ko Rangitane, a nationally important nature reserve (Figure 2).

Figure 2:    Geography of the Kāpiti Coast

10.                

11.                

12.               The mana whenua – the people with ‘authority and guardianship’ over the land’ – on the Kāpiti Coast are Te Āti Awa ki Whakarongotai, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga and Ngāti Toa Rangatira. The Kāpiti Coast District Council works in partnership with these three iwi under a long-standing Memorandum of Partnership known as Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti. We also recognise that some Māori on this land identify with iwi outside the rohe of the Kāpiti Coast.

Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti first met on 8 March 1994 and stems from two core principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The first principle, ‘partnership’, obliges both parties ‘to act reasonably, honourably and in good faith’. For that, consultation is vital. The second principle, ‘active protection’, requires the Crown to protect Māori in the use of their lands and waters to the fullest extent practicable.

Our population is growing, 2,500 people joined our community in 2019 alone, an increase of 1.3% on our 2018 population. At least 56,000 people will call the Kāpiti Coast District home in 2020, and this number is projected to continue to increase as people are attracted into the district.

13.               Forecasts from 2015 estimate that our population will reach 68,548 by 2043 (Figure 3). This is an increase of just under 1% growth per annum. Other districts such as Tauranga and Selwyn have experienced population surges, and there is the strong potential for our area to experience these same levels of growth. Any growth, if supported to be sustainable, provides opportunities for increasing our workforce, our talent pool, and growing our economy.

 

Figure 3:    Population forecasts Kāpiti Coast 2013-2043

14.              

1   Source: idcommunity (https://forecast.idnz.co.nz/kapiti)

15.               Our population is the second oldest in New Zealand, with 27% of us aged 65 or older, up from 24% in 2009 (nationally this portion is 16%). Our working age population (15-64 years) is 10% smaller than the national average, and we also have a lower percentage of young people (0-14 years old) than the national average.

16.               Our average household size is smaller than the Wellington Region and for the rest of New Zealand. Almost 30% of us live alone, while around 65% live in one family households.

17.               We are within easy reach of the capital city, meaning a high proportion (46%) of our residents travel daily for work outside our district. We have pockets of wealth and pockets of deprivation. On the New Zealand Deprivation Index (NZ DEP), Ōtaki ranks as significantly deprived while most of the semi-rural and rural areas in Kāpiti Coast are some of the least deprived in New Zealand.

Economy and industries

18.               Alongside the strategic and demographic context set out in above, it is also important to understand the Kāpiti Coast economy. Appendix 1 provides a high-level overview of the economy.  The following section provides a summary of:

·       GDP and employment

·       our key industries

·       wellbeing.

GDP and employment

In 2019, GDP for the Kāpiti District was almost $2 billion (2019 prices). On average economic growth has been increasing steadily over the past 10 years at 2.4% p.a., in line with national growth of 2.5% p.a. However, the district’s economy is predicted to contract by 7% over the year to March 2021 as a result of Covid-19 impacts.

Employment figures were also positive in 2019 and our labour market was tight. A total of 17,693 people were employed in the Kāpiti Coast District in 2019. In the same year, our unemployment rate was 3.4% (compared to the national rate of 4.1%).

Self-employment in the district is high. A total of 27.9% of workers were self-employed in the Kāpiti Coast District in 2019, much higher than the national rate of 16.2%.

19.               However, as a consequence of the impacts of Covid-19, employment growth is predicted to become negative 9.2% by March 2021, with over 1,600 jobs expected to be lost in the district and those in lower skilled jobs taking the largest hit (700). Despite this, the unemployment rate is predicted to be less than the national rate (8.3% compared to 9%). Once economic recovery begins, it is anticipated that there will be opportunities for workers who have lost their jobs to be redeployed.

20.               A key priority of our Strategy is to develop a Workforce Plan. This involves understanding current and future workforce needs and the nature of the skills gap; this will help to inform the type of training and / or tertiary provider we need to attract to our district.

21.               Achieving, and then maintaining educational parity between Māori and non-Māori is important, to ensure that young Māori have the skills and support to get well-paid sustainable employment and be leaders in industry and the community.

22.               In 2018, 85% of Māori school leavers on the Kāpiti Coast left school with an NCEA Level 2 or above qualification. This percentage is much greater than the national average of 59% for Māori. However, Māori school leaver educational attainment on the Kāpiti Coast remains below the non-Māori result.

23.               Initial estimates have indicated that young people and Māori are likely to be disproportionally impacted by the economic impacts of Covid-19 and support will be needed to ensure that this does not result in long-term unemployment for these parts of our community.

Our key industries

A key set of industries continue to contribute to economic and employment growth in the district. These include:

·       Health care and social assistance – the biggest contributor to growth over the past decade, worth 10.2% of the districts GDP in 2019 and accountable for 14.4% of all filled jobs in the district. The strength of the industry is in part due to our elderly and aging population, which has increased the demand for aged care services. While a small number of jobs (23, a reduction of 0.9%) are predicted to be lost because of Covid-19, the industry’s strength will remain with GDP forecast to increase by $0.61 million (or 0.3%) over the next year.

·       Rental, hiring and real estate services – was worth 9.8% of the districts GDP in 2019, and employed 12.1% of those employed in 2019. Our district has become increasingly attractive and the growing housing market contributes to the strength of this industry. A decrease of activity is expected for this industry over the next year, with industry GDP falling by $5.7 million (2.9%) but activity is likely to recover in the medium to long term.

·       Professional, scientific and technical services – this was the second biggest contributor to economic growth over the past decade. In 2019, the industry contributed 9.8% to local GDP and accounted for 9.3% of filled jobs in the district. In 2019, 19% of those who were self-employed worked in this industry. Covid-19 will impact this industry in the short term, with 140 jobs losses (a reduction of 8.3%) predicted, with a reduction of $12.6 million in GDP (or 6.3%) by March 2021.

·       Construction – as a steady employer in the area, construction accounted for 15.9% of total filled jobs in 2019, and 9.1% of GDP. In 2019, almost a quarter of those who were self-employed worked in this industry. Construction activity is expected to decline in the short term, experiencing a reduction in GDP by 10.5% (the largest in the district), but will likely grow steadily between 2022-2025 and is a key response focus for government.

·       Manufacturing – is a big contributor to GDP, worth 9.1% of total GDP in 2019, but employs a smaller portion of the local workforce, accounting for 6.1% of filled jobs in 2019. By 2021 only a small number of jobs will be lost in the industry, but GDP is expected to fall by 5%.

·       Retail trade – is significant as an employer, accounting for 12.1% of total filled jobs in 2019, but is less of a contributor to GDP, worth 6.4% of total GDP in 2019. By 2021 around 250 jobs will likely be lost due to Covid-19 (a reduction of 12%) and GDP is expected to fall by $10 million (or 7.7%). Local retail and hospitality will need assistance with business support, redeployment and training opportunities.

·       Education and training - education on the Kāpiti Coast is reputable, strong, and growing. The industry made up 4.4% of GDP and accounted for 8.8% of total filled jobs in 2019. Covid-19 is expected to increase the demand for education and training as workers reskill themselves for the future with government announcing a number of schemes including apprenticeships to help address significant unemployment. Access to tertiary education courses has been impacted by the closure of the Whiteirea facility. 

·       Tourism - tourism GDP was $98.2 million, or the equivalent of 4.9% of the districts GDP in 2019. The accommodation and food services industry which contributes to tourism GDP is a big employer in the region accounting for 7.5% of filled jobs in 2019. In 2020 tourism has experienced significant reductions in activity due to Covid-19, however, domestic visitor activity is predicted to help revive the industry as restrictions allow. The district only has a small reliance on international tourism and as a result has not seen the same level of impacts as regions like Queenstown or Rotorua.

·       Creative Industries – the district is recognised as a creative area, with 4.2% of the local workforce employed in the sector, and the fourth highest concentration of creative jobs nationally, in 2019. However, Covid-19 is likely to have a severe impact on most of this sector and efforts to revive jobs in the sector will be needed.

24.               While recent economic performance has been good for many sectors, Covid-19 will likely reverse growth trends across most industries, with the full impacts not yet known. This will also impact incomes in the district either through wage reductions or job losses. As of 2019, mean annual earnings (a source of household income) for the Kāpiti Coast was $48,805, which is already significantly less than the national average of $63,000. More details are provided in Appendix 1.

Well-being

25.               Sustainable economic growth is an important contributor, but many factors determine people’s wellbeing such as housing affordability, household income and mental health. Just because a district or country is doing well economically does not mean all its people are. We want all of our community to have the ability to share in the benefits of a strong and growing economy. Making the best choices for current and future generations requires working together to look beyond economic growth on its own and consider social, environmental, and cultural implications.

26.               While there is still no single and universally accepted definition or measurement of well-being, there are a few clear areas where action is needed if we are to improve the well-being and quality of life of all our communities, including:

·       Jobs and earnings – the Kāpiti Coast has a higher proportion of workers in industries that are forecast to decline, leaving these workers more vulnerable if these job losses do occur.

·       Skills – the Kāpiti Coast has a lower proportion of workers who are classified as highly-skilled, reducing the potential for wage growth and higher paying jobs.

·       Young people Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) – the district historically has a higher NEET rate than other parts of the country, making pathways to employment more difficult and making it harder for employers to maintain existing workforce levels in the future.

·       Income and consumption – on average our householders have lower household income figures. This is driven by a lower personal earning potential than experienced in other parts of the country and has resulted in reduced local consumption and increased pressures on housing and rental affordability.

Areas of opportunity

There are significant opportunities to further grow and develop the Kāpiti Coast economy, including:

·       increasing the awareness of the Kāpiti Coast as a great place to live, visit and do business; highlighting our quality of life, improved infrastructure, rich culture, natural environment and resilience in order to retain and attract more residents, businesses and investment, and increase visitor spend and guest nights.

·       enabling increased higher paying local job opportunities for our communities, creating more employment and training pathways for our young people / rangatahi including those not in education, employment, or training (NEET), and facilitating opportunities for industry to connect to the skills, talent and expertise of older people and people with disabilities in the district.

·       highlighting our key sectors and environment, including what we have to offer in terms of manufacturing and service based industries, creative industries, productive lands and niche & artisan producers, attractions and parks, and working with iwi to unlock opportunities for Māori-owned land and businesses.

·       supporting and encouraging more businesses to start up and establish in the district. Kāpiti already has a high percentage of self-employed residents, 27.9% compared to 16.2% nationally and the opportunity exists to support further growth of these existing businesses, as well as helping new businesses establish and feel welcome.

Areas we need to improve

27.               There are also areas we need to improve, including:

·       continuing to develop and make the case for additional efficient, effective, and resilient transport infrastructure across all of the Kāpiti Coast and improving our connectivity to other centres.

·       developing, attracting, and retaining a skilled and competitive workforce, based on an understanding of current and future workforce needs, addressing skills gaps and shortages and facilitating greater connections between businesses, education and training providers and our communities.

·       improving community well-being including providing pathways to higher income jobs and enabling local career progression, supporting our young people / rangātahi and people with disabilities with sustainable pathways to employment and further training and encouraging entrepreneurship and innovation. Ensuring older people in our community have the opportunity to contribute their skills and experience in a way that recognises the unique contribution that they can bring as we continue to grow and adapt.

·       placing greater focus on growing and supporting our partnerships with iwi, business and the community and providing strong leadership and transparency, strengthening communication between groups and building trust.

·       support for key sectors and having a better understanding of their potential for growth and how best to facilitate and support this in partnership with the sector.

Priorities for action

28.               In order to take advantage of these opportunities and ensure we can make improvements where required there are a number of actions we need to take, key priorities include:

·       Addressing the skills gap – skills gaps are impacting all industries with highly skilled people being the most competitively sought after. We need to understand our current skills gap with regard to what key sectors require now and in the future.

·       Supporting our rangatahi/young people – our young people are an important asset and we need to create sustainable pathways to employment and further training.  Historically, we have a relatively high proportion of young people not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) and a large proportion of the youth population leave Kāpiti Coast for education and employment opportunities in larger centres. We need greater diversity with employment opportunities for youth and greater connectivity to local businesses.

·       Creating greater connections for older people into our economy – connecting older people to local businesses and key industries and creating more opportunity to share their skills, experience and connections to support new and growing businesses, entrepreneurs and workers.

·       Growing higher incomes – a high percentage of our workers are in low income jobs compared to the rest of New Zealand (retail trade, health care, social assistance, education, training, accommodation, food services). A greater proportion of households are in the low and medium income groups.

·       Attracting and utilising talent and skills – a total of 46% of workers live in Kāpiti Coast but work outside the district, with 25% working in Wellington City, where their earning potential is often greater. Growing more highly skilled local jobs is important, as this large commuting workforce provides significant unutilised potential that is not benefiting the local economy. From a quality of life perspective, extended periods away from family and community can impact on overall wellbeing.

·       Developing better amenities and services– while there have been improvements in our infrastructure, the district still has limited amenities compared to other regions (e.g. no tertiary education facilities compared to Wellington and Palmerston North; no 24-7 emergency care, no rail transport north of Waikanae, infrequent bus services).

·       Placing greater focus on growing and supporting our partnerships and providing strong leadership – these issues need a collective response, this means providing leadership and transparency, strong communication, building trust and partnerships to deliver our Strategy.

·       Responding to and adapting to climate change – it is important that there is a shared understanding of the impacts of climate change and that we are able to encourage the growth of sustainable, future focused industries and employment pathways, while working with existing businesses to be more sustainable.


Strategic Framework


Ngā Moemoea / Our vision

The above context and supporting analysis, has informed our vision for this Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan. As a community we have developed a strategic vision, Ngā Moemoea, that is at the heart of our Strategy.

Through partnership, support the growth of a vibrant, diverse Kāpiti Coast economy that provides increased opportunity, resilience, and well-being for all.

To achieve this vision, our partners, businesses, and communities have identified the need to work together to:

·       Celebrate our rich culture, natural environment and identity and highlight the opportunities and advantages of the Kāpiti Coast and attract domestic and international visitors, residents, and businesses to the district.

·       Adopt a business-friendly focus that enables all participants in the economy to operate to their full potential and contribute to a vibrant economy while protecting our natural environment.

·       Enable innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship by continuing to build connections and networks with local talent and supporting sustainable pathways for our current and future employment requirements, with a focus on Māori employment pathways and business initiatives.

·       Strengthen partnerships and leadership, providing increased opportunity for quality local entrepreneurship, growth and collaboration, while celebrating, protecting, and strengthening our unique and distinctive community.

·       Focus our efforts to grow those industries and sectors that provide the most potential for the Kāpiti Coast economy and our community.

Action in each of these areas will be essential if we are to deliver our vision and enhance our economy. The benefits of an enhanced economy extend well beyond solely financial benefits.

The bigger picture includes higher living standards, affordable housing, a sustainable environment and workforce and a district with access to services and amenities that support and improve our communities’ health and well-being; delivered through greater social amenity and more choices for local residents.

By working together on these areas, we can expect to see a range of benefits, which could include:

·       Retaining and attracting new businesses, and growing key existing sectors, will attract talent and new residents, develop our workforce skills, grow jobs, and generate increased higher income opportunities. This means there are more employment opportunities for residents, which reduces the need to commute, as well as greater spend in our local economy enhancing wellbeing.

·       Growing and promoting Kāpiti Coast as a destination, means that new businesses and visitors will have a positive knock on effect to our economic wellbeing through household income, local jobs, visitor spend, local services and amenities.

·       More generally, the visitor economy allows Kāpiti Coast to maintain a larger economic footprint than the population could support by expanding the scale and range of commercial activities that can be sustained.  This creates more choices for residents, for example, the food and beverage offering in Kāpiti Coast would be greatly reduced in the absence of the visitor economy.

·       Supporting our youth / rangatahi population which not only offers a sustainable workforce opportunity for Kāpiti Coast but an opportunity to grow and support young innovators and entrepreneurs. This means Kāpiti Coast programmes such as Work Ready Kāpiti, Zeal, Startup Weekend (linked to Techweek), The Māoriland Hub and Pop Up Business School provide our rangatahi / young people with support, greater choice, opportunities and stepping stones to a bright future.

·       Working in partnership with our community to shape our district’s economy and environment. This means a more holistic and joined up approach to enhancing our wellbeing, environment, tackling climate change and growing the Kāpiti Coast. Kāpiti Coast District Council is already the leading Council in NZ for sustainability and climate change, we reduced our footprint by 76% and will continue working to reduce this further. This means we will work with Manu Whenua, our community, and businesses to encourage best practice and continue to improve.

Our strategic pillars

The above priorities and vision, shape the five pillars, N Pou, of this Strategy, and emphasise the need for the delivery of the Strategy in partnership and the importance of ensuring that all parts of our district can benefit from our actions over the next three years and beyond (Figure 4).

Figure 4:    Ngā Pou

Whakapapa

Kaitiakitanga

Whānau

Kotahitanga

Manaakitanga

 

Positioning the Kāpiti Coast

 

Open for Opportunity

 

Growing Skills and Capability

 

Strengthening Partnerships and Leaderships

 

 

Supporting Key Sectors

 

Looking at the objectives of each of these strategic pillars:

·       Whakapapa / Positioning the Kāpiti Coast – focuses on the actions required to enhance the visibility and attractiveness of the Kāpiti Coast as a destination.

·       Kaitiakitanga / Open for opportunity – focuses on the actions that will make the district more responsive and open to quality growth.

·       Whānau / Growing skills and capability – focuses on the actions that support workforce development, creativity, entrepreneurship and sustainability.

·       Kotahitanga / Strengthening partnerships and leadership – focuses on the actions that will ensure we have robust mechanisms for working together at both a local and regional level.

·       Manaakitanga / Supporting key sectors – focuses on actions that support the growth of key sectors and industries.

Under each of these pillars we have identified key actions which will be critical to delivering our objectives and overall vision (Figure 6). For each pillar we have indicated the medium-term outcomes, which we will report and monitor against over the next three years. We have also identified longer-term outcomes, which we expect to see improvements against over the next five years. While there is a connection between the medium and longer term outcomes, progress against the longer term outcomes will also be influenced by other external factors. 

Finally, we have identified impacts that align with the priorities of the Strategy and our vision for the Kāpiti Coast's economy, progress against these impact indicators will largely be outside of our control but they will be important indicators to measure progress against and to ensure that the actions we are taking are contributing to growing our local economy for the benefit of all our community. Our overall approach to measuring outcomes and impacts recognises that, given the implications of Covid-19, the Kāpiti Coast needs to ensure that it continues to maintain or improve its performance against national and regional averages and those of our neighbouring districts.


Figure 5:    Kāpiti Coast Economic Development Strategy – Strategic Framework

Ngā Moemoea / Vision

Through partnership, support the growth of a vibrant, diverse Kāpiti Coast economy

that provides increased opportunity, resilience, and well-being for all

Ngā Pou / Pillar

WHAKAPAPA / Positioning the Kāpiti Coast

KAITIAKITANGA /

Open for opportunity 

WHĀNAU /

Growing skills and capability

KOTAHITANGA / Strengthening partnerships and Leadership

MANAAKITANGA /

Supporting key sectors

Ngā Whāinga / Aim

Celebrate our rich culture, natural environment and identity and; highlight the opportunities and advantages of the Kāpiti Coast

Facilitate quality growth that protects and enhances the District and its natural environment

Enable employment, innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship and improve capacity for mana whenua participation

Delivery and implementation through strengthened partnerships and leadership and recognises the significant relationship with iwi as mana whenua

Grow industries and sectors that provide the most potential for supporting improved economic well-being  

Ngā Mahi / Actions

Develop and deliver the Kāpiti Coast Story

Facilitate and support major events

 

 

Ensure a welcoming and customer focused approach to council services

Have a coordinated approach to the facilitation of key opportunities

Ensure effective regulations that support growth and protect our environment, including the District Plan

Retain and attract businesses and agencies to the Kāpiti Coast

 

Develop a Workforce Plan including Youth Initiatives and opportunities for Māori, older people and people with disabilities.

Facilitate growth of international education

Advocate for local tertiary and Government apprenticeship linkages

Enhance business networking and training opportunities

Develop a business investment and support matching programme

Establish an Economic Development Kotahitanga Board and finalise the monitoring and reporting framework for the Strategy

Support the development and delivery of an integrated Covid 19 recovery plan

Support actions that enable mana whenua aspirations

Advocate for new and improved essential infrastructure including electrification of rail to Ōtaki

Support unique economic opportunities in our communities

Advocate for increased access to affordable housing to support the growth and retention of local residents

 

Identify opportunities and barriers experienced by key sectors, including high growth sectors

Develop a district-wide Destination Plan to support the growth of the visitor economy, including strengthened air linkages and supporting infrastructure such as the Kāpiti Gateway.

Support the development and delivery of a Kāpiti Creative Industries Plan

Facilitate and support the development of a Climate Change Strategy.

Support development of industry led groups

Ngā whakaputa nga takawaenga / Medium term outcomes

 

Increased awareness of the Kāpiti Coast as a destination

Increase in number of attendees at major events delivered

 

Businesses recognise Kāpiti Coast as a great place to establish and grow

Key industries and businesses feel supported

More businesses and organisations actively considering the Kāpiti Coast

Improved match between workforce needs and skills available

Increase in employment and training pathways for young people, people with disabilities and Māori

Increased business networking and awareness of training and support

 

Increased business engagement

Increased advocacy for Kāpiti Coast

Increase in Government investment into district

Targeted actions to support growth of key industries

Growth of visitor economy

Improved resilience, climate change awareness and education across key industries and businesses 

Industry led business groups established

 

Ngā whakaputa nga roroa / Longer term outcomes

 

Increase in visitor numbers and expenditure

Increase in new businesses establishing in district

 

Growth of key industries and businesses

Economic impacts and opportunities of key projects understood and realised

 Relocation of Government Offices to Kāpiti Coast (combined 200+ FTE)

Increase level of qualification attainment

Decrease in proportion of young people/rangatahi not in education, employment or training (NEET)

Decreased rates of unemployment

Increase in investment into key industries and businesses

Increased infrastructure investment in Kāpiti Coast

Manu whenua aspirations realised

 

Growth of key industries and businesses

Reduction in emissions and increased climate resilience

Sustainable multi-sector partnership and collaboration

Impacts

Employment Growth – increase in local employment options and pathways

Mean Income Growth – increase in higher paying local employment and income generating  opportunities

Business Unit Growth – increase in businesses establishing, expanding and moving to the district

GDP Growth – increased growth of the local economy and key sectors.

Implementation and Delivery


Detailed action plans

The following section details the specific actions that form the basis of the implementation plan for this Strategy.  Each of the proposed actions have been prioritised using a rating of 1, 2 or 3, with those actions rated 1 being the top priority for delivery.  For each action, we have identified the lead agency who will drive the delivery with identified partners that may have direct involvement or function in an advisory / information only capacity. We then describe how each lead agency will work with partners to deliver the key action. Finally, we have set out an anticipated timeline for the start and completion of each action.  

Ngā Pou / Pillar:  Whakapapa / Positioning the Kāpiti Coast

The aim of the Whakapapa / Positioning the Kāpiti Coast pillar is to celebrate our rich culture, natural environment and identity and highlight the opportunities and advantages of the Kāpiti Coast to increase visitation, support the growth of new and existing businesses and grow the district’s residential population. Proposed actions are detailed in Table 1.

Table 1:     Whakapapa / Positioning the Kāpiti Coast – Key Actions

Nga Mahi / Action

Priority

Lead

Partners

How we will work

Delivery

Complete the development and implementation of the Kāpiti Coast Destination Story, including a set of marketing and promotional material - available for use by the Council, partners and stakeholders.

1

KCDC

Iwi, WellingtonNZ, Chamber, Manaaki, Kāpiti Arts & Creative Industries group, other Industry Groups, Youth Council and Community Boards.

KCDC will lead this action with input and support sought from our partners.  Further work with iwi, businesses and partners will be required on an ongoing basis to keep the story relevant and up-to-date.

Jul 20 - Ongoing

Facilitate and support the delivery of major events and encourage greater business connectivity, sustainability, public transport use and community involvement.

1

KCDC

Iwi, WellingtonNZ, Chamber, Community Boards, Event organisers

KCDC will coordinate a process with partners to ensure greater awareness, support and leverage of our Major Events.

Ongoing

Facilitate and support the development of a Climate Change Strategy.

1

KCDC

Iwi, GWRC, WellingtonNZ, Chamber, Community Boards

Council will work with partners to develop a climate change strategy.

Mar 21– Mar 22

·  

Ngā Pou / Pillar:  Kaitiakitanga / Open for opportunity 

29.               The aim of the Kaitiakianga / Open for Opportunity pillar is to adopt a customer focus that enables all participants in the economy to operate to their full potential and contribute to a vibrant economy, while protecting the natural environment. Proposed actions are detailed in Table 2.

Table 2:     Kaitiakianga / Open for Opportunity – Key Actions

Nga Mahi / Action

Priority

Lead

Partners

How we will work

Delivery

Deliver a welcoming and customer focused approach to council services that works in partnership with others.

1

KCDC

Iwi, Industry, Chamber, Community.

KCDC to implement a process for evaluating improvement in our customer approach across the organisation that is reported to Council and community annually.

Aug 20- Ongoing

Provide a coordinated approach to the facilitation of key opportunities

 

1

KCDC

Iwi, Industry Groups, WellingtonNZ, Chamber

KCDC will review its activities to ensure a coordinated approach is taken to facilitate key investment and business opportunities in the district.

Aug 20 – ongoing

Ensure effective policies and regulations, including the Annual Plan, District Plan, Long Term Plan and Economic Development strategy align; that collectively we support and enable sustainable quality growth outcomes that effectively utilise available land; that meets the requirements of all users, including business and housing.

2

KCDC

Iwi, Development Community, Chamber, Industry Groups, Housing Taskforce, Community, Youth Council

KCDC's will work with partners to encourage clear communication and understanding of new policies and regulations and that our community feel that they have had the chance to be part of this process. A newsletter to industry will be developed to support this.

Ongoing

Take a targeted approach to attract new businesses and agencies to the Kāpiti Coast, with an initial focus on increased Government presence and growing more higher paid jobs and skills.

2

KCDC

Iwi, WellingtonNZ, NZTA, Industry, Gvmt agencies

Council will work with partners to drive the importance of Kāpiti Coast as a District that offers resilience and diversity to businesses and to Government agencies.

Aug 20 – Ongoing


 

Ngā Pou / Pillar:  Whānau / Growing Skills and Capability 

30.               The aim of the Whānau / Growing Skills and Capability pillar to enable innovation, creativity, entrepreneurship and growth, while building connections and networks with local talent in the community and supporting sustainable pathways for employment and improving capacity for mana whenua participation. Proposed actions are detailed in Table 3.

Table 3:     Whānau / Growing Skills and Capability – Key Actions

Nga Mahi / Action

Priority

Lead

Partners

How we will work

Delivery

Develop and deliver a Workforce Plan including youth initiatives

1

KCDC / Iwi

Chamber, Industry, MSD, Work Ready Kāpiti, Youth Council, Kāpiti Disabilities Advisory Group, Grey Power.

KCDC will work with industry to understand workforce needs and skill gaps and engage partners in developing the workforce plan. KCDC will work with partners to develop and deliver a Youth Initiative for PGF – He Poutama Rangatahi Fund.

Feb 20 – Jun 21

Develop in partnership with our older persons and industry a programme that offers opportunities for older persons to re-enter the workforce e.g. contract, mentor in business and supporting young people.

2

KCDC

Iwi, Grey Power, Kāpiti Retirement Trust, Industry, Chamber, KEDA, Older Persons Council

KCDC will facilitate with partners the development of a programme for older persons to re-enter the workforce, mentoring, training, supporting young people into work etc.

June 21 – Dec 21

Facilitate the growth and attraction of international education

2

Kāpiti Coast College

KCDC, WellingtonNZ, Youth Council, colleges, and schools

Council and WellingtonNZ support Kāpiti's International Education Programme through promotion and identifying growth opportunities.

Ongoing

Deliver relevant business workshops and networking events. Create greater visibility and increase access to training and networking in Kāpiti and Wellington to support the growth and establishment of businesses in the district.

2

WellingtonNZ / Chamber of Commerce

KCDC, Industry Groups and businesses

Wellington NZ and Chamber will work with partners to understand training, business workshop needs. Chamber will work with partners to promote networking events.

Ongoing

Advocate for tertiary and apprenticeship linkages that enable pathways, upskilling and higher incomes linking with the Wellington Regional Workforce Development Strategy

2

KCDC / Iwi

Youth Council, Universities, Weltec / Whiteirea, Wananga WellingtonNZ, Chamber of Commerce, National Skills Academy

Co-designing fit for purpose programmes based on industry need, growth and demand working to enable a sustainable workforce and higher incomes.

Aug 20 – Ongoing


 

Develop a business investment and support matching programme to support the growth and establishment of businesses in the district.

2

KEDA

WellingtonNZ, KCDC, Chamber of Commerce

Kick Start Kāpiti will develop this programme with support from its partners by way of advice and promotion.

Aug 20 – Dec 20

 

Ngā Pou / Pillar:  Kohahitanga / Strengthening Partnerships and Leadership  

31.               The aim of the Kohahitanga / Strengthening Partnerships and Leadership pillar to achieve effective delivery and implementation of this Strategy through strengthened partnerships and leadership and recognise the partnership with iwi as mana whenua. Proposed actions are detailed in Table 4.

Table 4:     Kohahitanga / Strengthening Partnerships and Leadership – Key Actions

Nga Mahi / Action

Priority

Lead

Partners

How we will work

Delivery

Establish an Economic Development Kotahitanga Board, which will be capability based and led by an independent chair and finalise the monitoring and reporting framework for the Strategy

1

KCDC / Iwi

Drafting Group, Chamber, KEDA

KCDC will work with Partners and Stakeholders to finalise an appropriate model and Terms of Reference to setup and implement.

Aug 20

Support the delivery of actions identified by iwi that enable the aspirations of mana whenua.

1

Iwi

KCDC, WellingtonNZ, industry, GWRC, DoC

Te Whakaminenga o Kāpiti will work with partners to shape actions and how they will be delivered for mana whenua.

Ongoing

Support the development and delivery of integrated Covid 19 recovery plan for the Kapiti Coast

1

KCDC

Iwi, Industry, Wellington NZ, Government, Chamber, Community

KCDC will work with Partners and Stakeholders to develop and implement a recovery plan.

Aug 20 - Ongoing

Advocate for increased access to affordable and social housing to support the growth and retention of local residents.

 

1

KCDC / Iwi

Community

Advocate to Government to increase investment and support for increased social and affordable housing by completing an analysis of the current housing availability and impacts on community and personal wellbeing.

Sep 20 - Ongoing

Advocate for improved transport infrastructure including the extension of the electrification of rail to Ōtaki as a priority to support growth.

2

KCDC

WellingtonNZ, NZTA, Elevate Ōtaki, Iwi, Community Boards, KEDA, Chamber

Lobby GWRC and Government's Transport Minister, as a District on the significant economic impact.

Ongoing

Support Elevate Ōtaki activities with the ongoing work pertaining to the expressway and future opportunities.

3

Elevate Ōtaki

KCDC, Iwi, Ōtaki Community Board

Elevate Ōtaki will continue to progress actions that came out of their Ōtaki Business Survey and strategic plan.

Ongoing

Support the redevelopment of the Waikanae Library which may include shared space activity in the Waikanae Town Centre.

3

KCDC

Waikanae Community Board, Iwi, Businesses

Establish a project advisory group inform the project vision, objectives and analysis of potential future building options.

June 20 - Ongoing

Support the Wainuiwhenua project, Paekākāriki to understand the economic impact of the proposal.

3

Wainuiwhenua project

GWRC, Iwi, Paekākāriki Community Board, KCDC, DoC

We will support the Wainuiwhenua Project and partners to understand the economic impact of the proposal.

Ongoing


 

Ngā Pou / Pillar:  Manaakitanga / Supporting Key Sectors  

32.               The aim of the Manaakitanga / Supporting Key Sectors pillar to grow industries and sectors that provide the most potential for supporting improved economic wellbeing. Proposed actions are detailed in Table 5.

Table 5:     Manaakitanga / Supporting Key Sectors – Key Actions

Nga Mahi / Action

Priority

Lead

Partners

How we will work

Delivery

Undertake research to identify how best to support our high growth sectors, their potential for further growth and current constraints and opportunities for growth.

1

KCDC

Industry, WellingtonNZ, Iwi

KCDC will work with WellingtonNZ to identify and understand our high growth sectors, which will inform an industry specific growth plan.

Aug 20 – Jul 21

Develop and implement a district wide Destination Plan, which links into the Regional Destination Plan. 

1

WellingtonNZ / KCDC

Manaaki Kapiti, Iwi, Industry

KCDC will work with partners to develop and implement our Visitor Destination Plan including strengthened air linkages and supporting infrastructure such as the Gateway project.

Aug 20 – Mar 21

Support the Kāpiti Creative Industries cluster group to develop the Kāpiti Creative Industries Action Plan including attracting investment to assess the feasibility of establishing a Creative Hub, skills development and visitor attraction projects.

1

KACI

KCDC, Kapiti Chamber of Commerce, WellingtonNZ, MBIE, Iwi

KACI will seek input, advise, and support from its partners to develop and implement their industry action plan, including the identified actions relating to the Creative Hub, skills development and visitor attraction projects.

Jun 20 – Mar23

Encourage the reduction of waste and emissions as a way to cut costs and  have a positive environmental impact

2

KCDC

Industry/business, iwi, Chamber of Commerce

KCDC will work with partners to promote that we provide waste audits for businesses, support zero waste major events and will focus on working with developments / builders to reduce construction waste.

Sep 20 – ongoing

Support the development and ongoing growth of industry led groups. 

2

Industry

KCDC, WellingtonNZ, education providers, Chamber, KEDA

Support industry groups to identify their roadblocks to growth, training needs and wider support opportunities and lobby on their behalf.

Ongoing

Governance and Accountability


Accountability

33.               This section describes how the Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan will be delivered with transparency and accountability. This includes details on the approach to:

·       Governance

·       Prioritisation

·       Monitoring and reporting

·       Review

·       Implementation timeline

Governance

34.               For all partners and stakeholders, the ongoing arrangements for governance and delivery of this strategy and implementation plan are as important as the proposed actions. There is recognition that governance needs to be consistent, continuous, and effective.

35.               It is the shared view of Council, our partners and stakeholders, that the governance of this strategy should be independently led, and council supported with future transition to a more independent model. All partners and stakeholders are committed to governance principles based on:

·       Transparency

·       Accountability

·       Stewardship

·       Integrity

·       Trust

36.               In this context, independence is critical. Equally, there is a need to ensure that partners and stakeholders work together as a district to delivery this Strategy. Recognising this, it is agreed that:

·       the Economic Development Kotahitanga Board is established

·       an independent chair is appointed by Council to build trust, pull together a strong Board and provide a unified strategic direction

·       the Board will be selected based on capability and Board members need to be able to work productively with multiple partners and stakeholders within and outside the district

·       a council representative will be an ex-officio member of the Board

·       local iwi (Te Āti Awa ki Whakarongotai, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga and Ngāti Toa Rangatira) will each have representation on the Board

·       council will provide support to the Board

·       a separate Terms of Reference Agreement will be developed along with performance measures that will be agreed with Council and the Board

·       it is proposed that the initial core responsibilities of the Board would focus on overseeing the Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan, advocating for Kāpiti Coast and for economic development activities in the district, and being a relationship broker, with a focus on the establishment of strategic relationships to progress the outlined key priorities of this strategy.

37.               The Board will also play an important role in finalising and agreeing the monitoring and reporting framework for the Strategy. This recognises that given the Covid-19 pandemic, there is a need to understand more fully the economic impacts on the local economy and how these might affect our economic performance and growth.

Prioritisation

38.               The detailed action plans set contain a significant number of actions that will be progressed by the Council and its key partners over the coming years. Looking across the strategic pillars, Table 6 sets out each of the priority actions for year 1.

Table 6:     Year 1 – Priority Key Actions

Pillars / Ngā Pou

Year 1 Priority Action

Delivery Timeline

Positioning Kāpiti Coast / Whakapapa

Deliver the Kāpiti Coast Story

Ongoing

Open for Opportunity / Kaitiakitanga

Provide a coordinated approach for key investment and business opportunities

Aug 2020 – Ongoing

Growing Skills & Capability / Whānau

Develop a Kāpiti Coast Workforce Plan, including youth initiative

Feb 20 – Jun 21

Supporting key sectors / Manaakitanga

Develop a Kāpiti Coast Destination Plan and a strategy for one other key sector

Aug 20 - Jun 2021

Strengthening Partnerships and Leadership / Kotahitanga

Establish an Economic Development Kotahitanga Board and finalise the monitoring and reporting framework and performance agreement and measures for the Strategy.

Aug 20

Monitoring and Reporting

39.               Monitoring progress and making recommendations for the future is critical to a well-functioning Strategy and Implementation Plan. It helps us know what is working and what might need to change. These are important mechanisms for managing risk and holding each other to account if implementation does not happen as it should.

40.               A half yearly report will be prepared outlining progress to date against each of the actions, timeframes and issues and risks. This report will be published with immediacy on the Council’s website after each meeting. Elements of the report may be withheld if there are reasons to do so, such as commercial-in-confidence information.

41.               The Chair of the Governance Board will provide an in person report to the Strategy and Operations and Te Whakaminenga O Kāpiti Committees at least every six months to detail progress against the Strategy and Implementation Plan, and receive advice from elected members at this time on any improvements or additional actions (which would require sufficient resourcing).

42.               The Chair of the Governance Board will oversee development of an annual report for publication at the end of Year 1 and Year 2 of operations, identifying progress, risks, and next steps. Council senior leadership and staff will make themselves available to work with the Board on actions and provide updates, as is deemed reasonable and fair.

Review

43.               The Chair of the Governance Board will commission a short (6 week) review mid-way through Year 2 to establish whether the Strategy and Implementation Plan are on track and the governance is working effectively. Recommendations will be provided to the Council and reported on publicly.

The Chair of the Governance Board will initiate planning for the next three years of the Economic Development Strategy and Implementation Plan (i.e. 2023-2026) from the beginning of Year 3. In addition, the annual reporting process will also serve as a mechanism for reviewing progress and establishing future year priorities.


Appendix 1: Our Economy


GDP and growth

44.               GDP for the Kāpiti Coast District was almost $2 billion in 2019 (2019 prices), growing by 1.5% on the previous year. This was only half the rate of growth New Zealand experienced, with grow of 3% between 2018 and 2019.

45.               Key sectors that contributed to our GDP in 2019 include:

·       Health care and social assistance - 10.2%

·       Rental, hiring and real estate services – 9.8%

·       Professional, scientific and technical services – 9.8%

·       Construction - 9.2%

·       Manufacturing – 9.1%

·       Retail trade – 6.4%

·       Education and training - 4.4%

 

These industries are also our biggest employers, making up 70% of total filled jobs in the district. (More detail is provided in the following sections on key industries and employment).

 

Figure 6:    Proportion of GDP 2019

Source: Infometrics

46.               Over the last 10-years, economic growth in the district averaged 2.4% p.a. compared with an average of 2.5% p.a. nationally.

47.               Health care and social assistance, and the professional, scientific and technical services industries were the two biggest contributors to economic growth during this time.

48.               Immediate future growth is expected to be negative as a result of Covid-19 impacts. The districts economy is predicted to contract by 7% over the year to March 2021. While the national economy contracts by 8%. The construction and retail industries will experience the largest decline in GDP over this time period.

Key industries

Construction

49.               Construction was the third largest contributor to economic growth over the past decade. In 2019, construction contributed $184m to GDP (9.2% of total GDP).

50.               In 2019, it was the largest industry employer in the area. 2,805 people were employed in construction, making up 15.9% of total filled jobs in the district.

51.               Construction is also an important industry for those who are self-employed. 1,174 people were self-employed in the construction sector. This is 41.9% of total employment in the construction industry in 2019.

52.               House construction was the largest employer within the construction industry in, comprising 594 of all jobs in the industry, an increase of 44 jobs in the last year to March 2019.

53.               Large infrastructure investments in the area also contribute to construction’s importance in the district’s economy. Transmission Gully, a 27 km, 4 lane motorway which runs from Paekākāriki (in the Kāpiti Coast District) south to Linden (in Tawa), is likely to be completed by 2021. An expressway from Peka Peka to Ōtaki is also expected to be open to traffic by 2021.

54.               Future projects include the construction of a four-lane highway from Ōtaki to north of Levin by 2029. Together these projects comprise a substantial portion of the Wellington Northern Corridor. They will provide increased connectivity to the coast and help support the construction industry long term.

55.               In the short term, Infometrics expects that the amount of money spent on construction projects overall will continue to decline due to Covid-19 impacts. This is expected to rise between 2022-25 as investment begins after a period of historically low construction volumes and the government tries to stimulate the economy through infrastructure projects, and housing demands continue.

56.               GDP for the industry is expected to fall by $19.2 million between March 2020 and March 2021. Employment in the industry is expected to fall by 326 jobs between 2020 and 2021 (a decrease of 11.6%). With this lower construction work likely to see the largest reduction in Māori employment.

57.                

Health care and social assistance

58.               The health care and social assistance industry is the largest contributor to GDP in the district worth $203.3 million in 2019 (10.2% of total GDP). It contributes a much higher percentage towards GDP in the Kāpiti District than New Zealand as whole, with the sector making up only 5.8% of national GDP.

59.               The industry is our second largest industry employer, employing 2,540 (14.4% of total filled jobs) in 2019 and it continues to grow. While a small number of jobs (23, a reduction of 0.9%) are expected to be lost by March 2021 the industry’s strength will remain over the next year and likely in the medium to long term. GDP of the industry, in the Kāpiti district is forecast to increase by $0.61 million (or 0.3%) between March 2020 and March 2021.

Aged care and support

 

60.               Aged care and support is the largest driver of growth within the health care and social assistance industry. Made up of aged care residential services, other residential services and other social assistance services. It employs almost 62% of those working in the wider health care industry (1,562 filled jobs in 2019).

61.               Within this figure, aged care residential services remain the largest employer, employing 936 people in 2019. This accounted for 5.3% of total employment in Kāpiti Coast in 2019.

62.               The aged care and support sub industry is expected to continue growing in Kāpiti. Pre-covid projections forecasted strong employment growth over the next 5-years for the industry.

Professional, scientific and technical services

63.               The professional, scientific and technical services industry was the third largest contributor to GDP for Kāpiti, GDP for the industry was $195 million in 2019 (9.7% of total GDP).

64.               Between 2009 and 2019 the industry added $67 million to the Kāpiti Coast’s total GDP, making it the second largest contributor to economic growth over the last 10 years. This growth is reflected in employment growth figures which have averaged 4.0% since 2000.

65.               The industry is currently our fourth largest employer, filling 1,650 (or 9.3% of total filled) jobs to March 2019. This figure is up by 2.9% on 2018 employment figures, ahead of the national growth of 1.8% for the industry.

66.               Covid-19 will impact this industry in the short term. Over March 2020-2021, this industry is expected to experience around 140 jobs losses (a reduction of 8.3%). Early estimates for the year ended March 2021 see GDP in industry reducing by 6.3% (the equivalent of $12.6 million).

Retail

67.               The retail trade industry is the district’s eighth largest contributor to Kāpiti Coast’s GDP, with GDP of $128m in 2019 (6.4% of total GDP). This is growth of 3.6% on 2018.

68.               Employment was 2,146 in 2019. This was 12.1% of total filled jobs for the district, making it our third largest single employer by industry. Employment growth has averaged 1.1% while industry growth has averaged 3.1% since 2000.

69.               Unfortunately, retail will take one of the largest economic and employment hits due to Covid-19. By 2021 around 250 jobs will likely be lost due to Covid-19 (a reduction of 12%) and GDP is expected to fall by $10 million (or 7.7%). This is a reflection of lockdown restrictions, reduced tourism activity and reduced household spending.

Education and training industry

70.               The education and training industry is our 9th largest single industry contributor to GDP, contributing $87 million to GDP in 2019 (8.8% of total GDP for the district).

71.               1,559 people were employed in the industry in 2019, making education and training our fifth largest employer. 31 new jobs were created in the industry in the last year.

72.               Education on the Kāpiti Coast is reputable and strong with 3 colleges, Ōtaki’s tertiary institution Te Wananga O Raukawa, as well as two Māori immersion schools and two bilingual units within mainstream schools. A new primary school opened in 2018, reflecting the growth of our district and this industry.

73.               Education and training is relatively immune to the impacts of Covid-19 and growth of the industry in the district is expected to continue. Employment is expected to increase by 1% (15 new jobs) between 2020 and 2021, while GDP for the industry is predicted to increase by 0.2% (or $0.19 million).

Creative industries

74.               In New Zealand, the creative industries do not have a dedicated industry division for statistical purposes but are calculated based on activity within Arts & Recreation, Manufacturing and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. In 2017, the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research calculated that the creative industries sector cumulatively contributed $17.5 billion to New Zealand’s GDP, and its 130,000 workers made up 6% of the national workforce.

75.               In 2019, the Kāpiti Coast was identified as having the fourth highest percentage of our workforce employed in the creative sector in New Zealand, which is consistent with previous years (Figure 7).

Figure 7:    Percentage of workforce employed in Creative Industries

76.               A screenshot of a cell phone

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77.                

The creative industries have been significantly impacted by Covid-19 and support is needed to revive the jobs that are likely to be lost within the sector. Modelling by Treasury suggests that without government intervention, the cultural sector will be hit roughly twice as hard as the rest of the economy, and 11,000 jobs could be lost within a 12-month period.

The Kāpiti Arts & Creative Industries cluster group has a key role in supporting the resilience of the sector and delivery of recommended actions.

Tourism

GDP and employment

78.               In New Zealand, tourism does not have its own industry division for statistical purposes.  It is calculated based on activity within several measured industries including accommodation and food services, transport, retail trade, and arts and recreation services.

79.               In 2019, Kāpiti Coast’s GDP attributable to the tourism industry was $98.2 million. This equates to 4.9% of total GDP for the district, compared to 5.4% nationally.

80.               Both international tourist arrivals and domestic tourism has increased in New Zealand over the past decade and this increase has also been captured by the Kāpiti District. Growth in tourism GDP for the Kāpiti Coast has averaged 6.5% over the last decade compared to 8.1% in New Zealand. In absolute terms, tourism GDP in 2019 for the district was 1.9 times what it was 10 years prior ($52m to $98m).

81.               In 2019, the tourism industry employed an average of 1,199 people, which equates to 6.8% of the Kāpiti Coasts total employment in 2019. Employment growth has averaged 0.2% per year over the last decade.

82.               Tourism in 2020 has experienced significant reductions in activity due to Covid-19. Accommodation and food, and retail services relying on tourism will experience job losses and reduced spending in the district. Employment in accommodation and food alone is expected to fall by 30% by March 2021 (the equivalent of 388 jobs).

Tourism expenditure

83.               Tourism expenditure captures the amount of money visitors to the district spend while in the area (it is not the same as tourism GDP).

84.               In 2019, both domestic and international visitors spent $177 million in the Kāpiti Coast District, an increase of 1.3% on 2018 spend.

85.               Domestic visitors make up a larger portion of spending in Kāpiti (78.5%) than the Wellington Region (68.6%). Conversely, international expenditure for Kāpiti (21